13 Replies Latest reply: Jan 19, 2014 7:32 AM by eimhear92
mistinm Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

First, I live in Mexico - so getting tech support is difficult. I'm from the US and so are my electronics. I have a Macbook Pro OS X Lion 10.7.5 and an Iphone 4s

Last night, our cable and internet went out. This morning the cable was back on and so was the internet our phones. My Macbook (and my PC laptop) say theyre connected to my wi-fi at full strength but could not load web pages. (My PC said "can not connect to DNS server)

But then, I was able to restore my PC laptop to one week ago, and my internet started working again.

Now, my Macbook Pro and our phones are still not loading pages - but say they are fully connected to my wi-fi.

Does anyone know what I can do?! Should I mess with my DNS settings?


iPhone 4, iOS 6.0.2
  • MrHoffman Level 6 Level 6 (12,980 points)

    It's possible that your local DHCP server — that tends to be in the ISP-provided gateway router box — is not vending correct DNS information, or the DNS servers you're being provided with aren't working or aren't reachable.

     

    Three tests. 

     

    First, see if your MacBook Pro is getting an IP address.  If you have an IP address in whatever subnet you're using, and not a self-assigned address in 169.254.0.0/16.  

     

    Second, use Network Utility, and see if you can ping 8.8.8.8.  This is the Google DNS server, and it should respond to your pings.  If you get no response, you have no IP connectiity from your network to the Internet.

     

    Third, test DNS by configuring your MacBook Pro or your iPhone to use the Google DNS server 8.8.8.8 as your DNS server, and see if things start working again.  If that works, that implies there are issues with your ISP DNS servers.  Until those get sorted, you can choose to use 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 as your DNS servers; again, those are the IP addresses of the Google DNS servers.

     

    I'm going to guess that you aren't running OS X Server here; that's this community.  If you are running OS X Server, then there will be other tests and other details you will want to check.

  • mistinm Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Hi Mr. Hoffman,

     

    Thanks so much for your help and quick reply. I did a simple re-boot of the modem (for the 20th time today) and now both the PC laptop and Android phone are connecting to the web just fine. It is only the Apple products (my most important) that are not loading web pages.

    I'm sorry I'm not very techy - so I don't really understand your instructions.

     

    Do you mind describing how I would carry out your 3 tests? I'm not sure where to go to find out if my Macbook Pro is getting an IP address, also how do I ping?

     

    Do the IP address and DNS server numbers have to match on all 4 devices that we have?

     

    I would really appreciate it if you have time. Thanks again

  • Bradley Ross Level 1 Level 1 (70 points)

    Go to the Network panel on System Preferences.  Then click on the button marked "Advanced".  In the tabs at the top, select "TCP/IP".  If you are using DHCP for IPv4, click the button marked "Renew DHCP Lease".  I have found that Windows tends to renew the lease every time the system boots, while Mac often relies on the message from the ISP to determine when to renew the lease.  (When the system gets the IP address, it also receives a time at which the lease should be renewed.)

     

    The setting of DNS servers takes place using the "DNS" tab on this page.

     

    The IP address should be different on each of your devices since that is how your network identifies the devices.

     

    If you have your own wireless router attached to the box or cable from the ISP, try rebooting the devices in the following order.

     

    1.  Reboot the box from the ISP.  If you have access via cable TV, this will be the box attached to the television cable.

     

    2.  Reboot the wireless router.

     

    3.  Reboot the laptop.

     

    The idea is to reboot the devices starting with the box closest to ISP and going in order along the cable to your computer.

  • mistinm Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    HI Bradley,

     

    Thanks so much your help... before I reboot everything I wanted to write you (in case I lose internet on all my devices after the reboot). What should the DNS server numbers be? Right now they are 212.159.13.49 and 212.159.13.50 - but I put those in manually to match the DNS numbers on my working PC laptop. Not sure if I should've done that.... Also, is an ISP the same thing as a DNS? Should those numbers be the same? (they are the same on my iphone)

     

    Whew! Thanks for any help you could give

  • Csound1 Level 8 Level 8 (40,340 points)

    ISP=Internet Service Provider, ie: the company that you get Internet access from.

     

    Try these DNS servers, 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4

  • mistinm Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Csound,

    I'm still having problems. I connected my iphone to my friend's wi-fi and when I returned to my house, my iphone finally connected to the internet! But my Macbook Pro will still NOT load webpages! If I took my Macbook to Starbucks or something, used their wi-fi.. then came back home do you think it would connect?

    OR do you think I should keep trying to renew the lease in the network settings and change to DNS numbers?

    Also - do I put both sets of numbers in or just one?

     

    Thank you ALL!

  • Csound1 Level 8 Level 8 (40,340 points)

    Both,

  • Bradley Ross Level 1 Level 1 (70 points)

    Some definitions

     

    ISP (Internet Service Provider) - This is the organization that connects your system to the Internet.  Since you mention that the cable and the internet went out at the same time, I assume that your cable provider is also your ISP.

     

    IP address - With IP version 4, this is a set of 4 numbers from 0 to 255.  For example, when I connect to www.cnn.com, my system uses an IP address onnections to www.apple.com

     

    Domain name address - This is a group of words connected by periods, such as www.apple.com or www.cnn.com.

     

    DNS (domain name server) -- This is an online service that acts like a telephone book, giving you an IP address when you send ita domain name address.  Interaction with the DNS is done automatically by other applications on your system, such as the internet browser (Safari, Firefox, Internet Explorer, etc.)  The DNS will sometimes give you a different IP address depending on where you are.  The IP address given in Mexico may be different than the one given in Canada or USA, because it will give a more local number.

     

    If your Internet connection for your house uses DHCP (dynamic host configuration protocol), it will obtain the IP address for the cable rounter and the DNS system when it connects.  This is called a DHCP lease, with the idea that your cable box has leased an IP address from the ISP which should be yours until it expires.  (The expiration time for the lease is also given during the initial communication.)  When you renew the lease, you are asking the DHCP server to keep the IP address longer and get a later expiration time.  If the system can't renew the lease, it will give you a new IP address and a new expiration date. 

     

    The cable box acts as a DHCP server when talking to your MacBook, iPod, computer game, etc.  This means that the DHCP gives you an IP address for each device together with an expiration date.  (This address is from a special pool that can only be used within a local system.)   It will also pass on the address of the DNS server.

     

    Now suppose you enter http://157.166.241.11 into your internet browser.  If CNN appears, it means that all of your DHCP leases are good.  If it doesn't, you may have a DHCP problem.  Rebooting the cable box will cause it to renegotiate the DHCP lease with the ISP.  Rebooting each of the routers in turn followed by the end device will cause them to renegotiate their DHCP leases.  I have found that this sometimes resolves problems like you describe.

     

    If you get CNN when you enter http://157.166.241.11 but not when you enter http://www.cnn.com, it means that you may have a DNS problem.  Your system can find a system using an IP address (think of it as a telephone number), but it can't find the IP address for a given domain name.  (Think of it as not being able to find the telephone number in the telephone book, or possibly it can't even find the telephone book.)

     

    People normally use the DNS supplied by the ISP.  However, there are many other DNS servers out there.  What the previous comments are saying are that two of these are at the addresses 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4.  Any number of people can use a DNS server.  It identifies the location of the telephone book, not the location of your device.  If you enter the addresses of those DNS servers in your configuration and you can then access http://www.cnn.com, you are having a problem with the DNS servers supplied by your ISP.  They could be out of service or simply taking so long to respond that your system is ignoring them.  Alternatively, the DHCP server could be giving you the wrong address for the DNS server.

     

    When my daughter was at college, I changed the DNS address from the one for her apartment building to the one supplied by the college.  The one used by her apartment building was apparently very overloaded.

     

    If your area is using IP version 6, the IP addresses will be eight numbers separated by colons.  The numbers will be hexadecimal, meaning that the digits go from 0 to 9, then from A to F.

     

    Try working in this order.

     

    Enter http://157.166.241.11 in the browser.  If this doesn't work, try rebooting all of the devices in order from the cable connection to the individual devices.

     

    Try connecting your computer directly using an internet cable to the box supplied by the cable company.  If this works, you may have a problem with the routers in the middle.

     

    If you can connect using an IP address but not using a domain name, try entering the addresses for the DNS servers in your network configuration.

     

    If the DNS addresses work, you can use the same addresses for all of the other devices.

     

    <Edited by Host>

  • mistinm Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Bradley,

     

    You are a saint! It works finally!!!!

    I went to Starbucks to try to connect to their wi-fi - at first it did the same thing. Connected to wi-fi but didn't load pages. I tried the CNN IP Address... nothing. Then I went to my network settings - changed the DNS to 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 and shut down safari then re-opened and WAH-LAH!!!! It worked!!!

    My life will be so much easier now! No more transfering info from my Mac to a zip drive then to my other computer!

    THANK YOU!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    And Thank You all for your help! You guys are the best!

  • mistinm Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    And thank you CSound!

  • Bradley Ross Level 1 Level 1 (70 points)

    The addresses 212.159.13.49 and 212.159.13.50 are assigned to PlusNet Technologies Limited in Sheffield, England (See http://www.ripe.net).  If you were using a DNS server in England, there is a very good chance that you were getting the time out problem mentioned above.  8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 belong to Google in California (see http://www.arin.net).

  • Csound1 Level 8 Level 8 (40,340 points)

    mistinm wrote:

     

    And thank you CSound!

    You're welcome, glad to help.

  • eimhear92 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Hi

    Im currently in bulgaria and cant get my iphone 4s to connect to the wifi in the hotel. It is coming up full bars but wont connect to anything. My samsung tablet and my sisters phone will work. Could anyone help me please?