10 Replies Latest reply: Aug 12, 2006 3:14 PM by a brody
KMoorehouse Level 1 Level 1 (15 points)
Could anybody tell me what Apple's replacement policy is when you have a PB which has had multiple repairs ?

How serious do the repairs have to be before Apple will consider just replacing the unit ?

1.25 Ghz PB 15" Al, Mac OS X (10.4.5), 512 MB RAM
  • 1. Re: Apple Replacement policy
    BW Lee Level 4 Level 4 (2,560 points)
    What seems to be most common is that three major hardware failures will justify a replacement. They probably also factor in the age of your machine. How long have you had it? They do somewhat review everything on a case by case basis. So if you call them screaming and uttering profanities, you may not get the desired result. Make sure you have your paperwork or dispatch/case number for the repairs so they can verify your problems.
  • 2. Re: Apple Replacement policy
    Conal Ho Level 2 Level 2 (495 points)
    Good question. I'm wondering the same here too. My PB is in the shop for the 2nd time. After it came back from the first repair it died within 14 hours. I don't expect Apple to replace my PB for this repair although that would be nice. I'm now about 3 weeks without my workhorse which is really slowing down my productivity. And when I receive my fixed PB for the 2nd time, I know I'll be using it with some anticipation of early failure given what happened the first time it came back from repair.

    I'm working on my dissertation and wonder if I should just buy a new computer so I don't have to worry about another possible break down. sigh
  • 3. Re: Apple Replacement policy
    dwb Level 7 Level 7 (20,200 points)
    It really depends on how long you’ve had the computer, how serious the problem is, and how sometimes how long that particular model has been out. If you’ve had the computer for 2 years no matter how often it has been repaired you almost certainly won’t get a replacement. If you’ve had it 2 weeks and it is on its third repair - there’s good chance. And on occasion when a new model has just come out if the problem is ‘interesting’ enough Apple will want to examine the computer so you might get a replacement on the first repair.
  • 4. Re: Apple Replacement policy
    dnman13 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    It really depends on how long you’ve had the
    computer, how serious the problem is, and how
    sometimes how long that particular model has been
    out. If you’ve had the computer for 2 years no matter
    how often it has been repaired you almost certainly
    won’t get a replacement. If you’ve had it 2 weeks and
    it is on its third repair - there’s good chance. And
    on occasion when a new model has just come out if the
    problem is ‘interesting’ enough Apple will want to
    examine the computer so you might get a replacement
    on the first repair.


    That's not entirely true. I had a titanium pb g4, and after about 2.5 years, a bunch of repairs were needed on it, so after 4 repairs (still with the APP), i told them that under lemon law, they must replace it. so they gave me a newer aluminum 15" pb g4. now i've had that for 2 years, and its crapping up on me now. this is its 3rd repair, and its been with apple for 2 weeks, and they've had trouble locating a part for it, and now its taking long to even install the part. ive continually told them that if they don't fix this soon, then they will need to replace it because it is just so ridiculous for them to have it for so long.
  • 5. Re: Apple Replacement policy
    dwb Level 7 Level 7 (20,200 points)
    You'll note that I did employ the weasel word 'almost'. <grin> But I think you'd have to agree it is much more common for a replacement to be offered in the first year of ownership.
  • 6. Re: Apple Replacement policy
    a brody Level 9 Level 9 (63,265 points)
    Contact AppleCare. They should be able to give you an honest answer. Keep a case number in case you have to call back.
  • 7. Re: Apple Replacement policy
    Gazooks Level 1 Level 1 (25 points)
    Contact AppleCare. They should be able to give you
    an honest answer.


    No question that they should, no guarantee that they can or will. Keep in mind that Applecare reps are restricted by their administrative policy directives. Also be aware that class action looms.

    There seems, however, to be a de-facto acknowledgment by Apple that fatal flaws exist within the original AND replacement logic boards available within certain range of serial numbered 15" PowerBooks.

    After the second logic board failure, and a HD replacement, Apple is replacing my PowerBook, which lies within the serial# range of their extension program, with a Pro Book of comparable configuration.

    My PB was just over 1 yr. old when the first failure occurred, normally performed for a few days after repair, then resumed the previous symptoms of memory drop out, intermittent booting failure, etc.

    As one peruses these discussions, there are a host of issues that directly relate to logic board performance on a wide range of Books, and it seems Apple has no viable hardware remedy. The replacements are apparently as fault prone as the original. For those out of warranty it's salt in the wound.

    I'm now aware of logic board issues with the Pro Book as well, so there's no guarantee that future performance of that model will be more reliable, time will tell.

    It's beyond unfortunate, inconvenient, and costly to everyone affected to have system failures so ill understood by Apple, and if understood, so narrowly acknowledged. For a company that promotes itself as above the norm, it's credibility is seriously threatened by it's apparent limited sense of honesty and responsibility to it's customer base, or for that matter it's investors.

    Anyone experiencing repetitive failure related to logic boards should not have to be subjected to stonewalling by Apple for a suitable replacement, nor be misdirected to a course of time consuming repairs that are known by them to be futile, by reason of the benefit economics of deferral .

    If you have experienced multiple failures of logic board related function, either be resigned to live with it's likelihood of becoming a lifestyle, or resolve to press Apple for the appropriate replacement.


    .

    Powerbook 15   Mac OS X (10.4.7)   1.67 2gb Mac Mini 1.5Ghz 512mb iPod w/v 30gb Vaio 2.8Ghz 100gbx2 XP Pro

    Powerbook 15   Mac OS X (10.4.7)   1.67 2gram

    Powerbook 15   Mac OS X (10.4.7)   1.67 2gram
  • 8. Re: Apple Replacement policy
    a brody Level 9 Level 9 (63,265 points)
    Now while I'm not saying you did, but there are many who aren't aware of the inherent weaknesses of USB and Firewire ports who end up causing logicboard failures because these ports are soldered onto the logicboard. The weakness is that they use a thin fiberglass with inlaid circuitry sheet to hold the wires in place. Should you inadvertently bend that sheet, the port may become damaged, requiring a logicboard replacement. Finally, the cords of these types of cables go into a bulb style connector which if improperly pulled could cause the connector to have fraying damage. The best way to insert and remove such cables is to handle them by the cable bulb, and never pull by the wire itself, and push and remove at an angle directly in or out from the port.

    If you've been doing this, and still logicboard failures happen that's another thing, but you can't go by what people on the forum have experienced without knowing whether or not each one of them recognize this weakness exists and take suitable precautions. So don't let a general forum trend make you think all of the logicboards are flawed for the same reason. There are a lot of people out there who don't recognize the inherent port issues, and cause logicboard damage themselves.
  • 9. Re: Apple Replacement policy
    Gazooks Level 1 Level 1 (25 points)
    The weakness is that they use a thin
    fiberglass with inlaid circuitry sheet to hold the
    wires in place. Should you inadvertently bend that
    sheet, the port may become damaged, requiring a
    logicboard replacement.


    This certainly seems a fitting description of "design flaw" for a highly transportable computer subject to frequent, repetitive set-up connecting and disconnecting.

    Normal usage for most, having made a substantial investment in "well built, high quality" equipment, includes a careful handling of functional attachments. While I do not discount your description of the fragility of connectors, and they are configured as you describe, unless there's some inherent design requirement for that degree if rigid fragility, it's a short sighted construct.

    The new "mag" power connector on the Pro Book eliminates the problem from that connection, nice innovation. That strategy may not avail itself to other connectors, but a guide and locking mechanism could minimize the predictable, inadvertent or accidental missteps of connecting that would prove damaging to a integral component.

    Given the intended mobility of laptops, such fragility as you describe seems extremely poised to fail by design.

    Powerbook 15   Mac OS X (10.4.7)   1.67 2gram Mac Mini 1.5Ghz 512mb Vaio 2.8Ghz 100 gbx2 XP Pro
  • 10. Re: Apple Replacement policy
    a brody Level 9 Level 9 (63,265 points)
    Alas this is an inherent "flaw" of all laptops which rely on these connectors. Thus once you become aware of such a flaw, it is a good idea to inform the general public it exists so people know to take proper precautions. Thankfully companies like http://www.bookendzdocks.com/ develop easier to manage port removal and adding systems that make this less of an issue.