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HT1338 Does Apple recommend to install MacKeeper on MacBookAir?

1050 Views 17 Replies Latest reply: Sep 16, 2013 11:41 AM by Kurt Lang RSS Branched to a new discussion.
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Does Apple recommend to install MacKeeper on MacBookAir?

MacBook Air, iOS 6.1.4, MacBookAir
  • John Galt Level 7 Level 7 (33,220 points)

    NO

     

    Do not install such junk or anything like it.

  • Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (221,190 points)

    No, they don't, and neither do we. Stay away from it. You don't need nor want it.

  • gail from maine Level 6 Level 6 (10,395 points)

    OMG! Do NOT ruin your wonderful Macbook Air with that horrible piece of trash! You will forever regret it!

     

    Cheers,

     

    GB

  • MrJavaDeveloper Level 1 Level 1 (45 points)

    This guy wrote a review of all the drive testing software available for Macs (at least those with a good reputation, anyway.) In any case, the discussion "devolves" into a "MacKeeper" discussion. Here's the link:

     

    http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1544280

     

    The words for MacKeeper are not exactly what I call "high praise."

     

    Considering that Mac Keeper's pop ads seem to be everywhere, constantly informing me that my Mac is under some type of strange attack, I can conclude only one thing: Threats and Scare Tactics Sell!!

  • Tim Snoots Level 2 Level 2 (210 points)

    I can't ignore this post.  I've used every version of "Mac" operating system since the Mac Classic (Actually since Apple ][e) and can state without hesitation that the biggest threat in 13+ of "Mac" operating systems has always been users themselves.  To date, utilities, "system" or kernel extentions, anti-virus, and other unnecessary crap from 3rd-partys are a far larger threat to uninformed Mac users than any modern trojan mal-ware.

     

    Unfortionatly, it seems that even the editors of the best Mac periodicals frequently recommend utilities that make me "cringe" as an expirenced support provider.  The best thing that any Mac user can do for themselves is to simply take their new Mac out of the box, keep it updated with all new Apple Updates, and only install any additional applications or utilities that they absolutely need.  If it helps for comparison purposes I am an IT support provider and web developer, yet have a total of 8 icons in my main OS menu bar and not a single utility that modifies my dock!  And, with that said, I feel that I'm quite efficient in launching applications and moving around the Mac OS by simply using the built-in features and keystrokes.  Because of my lack of system modifications and unnecessarily installed crap, I have NEVER in all my years had a problem with a single OSX update.

     

    Therefore, if you are a Mac user like the original poster, I beg you to not install any applications or utilities on your Mac before doing thorough research about their trustworthiness and actual utility!  And, although just my personal opinion, this includes any security applications.  If you are not gullible user, then your Mac is perfectly safe with nothing but the built-in firewall, Gatekeeper enabled, not running as an administrative user, and not using Java in the browser.  There is still in 2013 no need for additional security software on your well maintained Mac unless you can be enticed to infect yourself with a trojan or break your otherwise stable Mac OS with unecessary utilities or crapware!

  • CaptH Level 1 Level 1 (35 points)

    I don't think I would be so inclined to simply lump every tool into a "harmful junk" category as your post seems to imply. For example,  among the products identified in the list MrJavaDeveloper has in his link, Scannerz, smartmontools, SMART Reporter are all reporting tools. They don't manipulate anything. They test and evaluate things and report results. The other tools do manipulate things, but they all have solid reputations.

     

    The reality is some people don't have an Apple store right around the corner and in some cases they may, but can't afford Apple's repair and evaluation costs. In such cases tools like these can be invaluable. Disk Utility by itself will not detect bad sectors on a drive, and only the recent versions of it did a better job reporting SMART status.

     

    These are, of course, all things that MacKeeper has nothing to do with.....

  • ZV137 Level 1 Level 1 (20 points)

    Considering the fact that Apple themselves use some of the diagnostic tools in the list of drive tools, I'd hardly call them "crap." I've seen Apple support people using TechTool Pro, Drive Genius, Scannerz, and Disk Warrior.

  • Kurt Lang Level 7 Level 7 (31,535 points)

    There are good utilities, and bad ones. DIskWarrior is a one trick pony, but has saved many users' data. TechTool Pro and Drive Genius have limited use (you only need what they can do very occasionally), but are good tools when you need them. MacKeeper is lower than the gunk at the bottom of the pickle barrel. There isn't one thing it does that can't be done either with OS X itself, or better, free third party apps.

  • ZV137 Level 1 Level 1 (20 points)

    I've seen time and time and time again statements like "every single non-Apple utiltiy on the market is junk and shouldn't be used" from some of this sites "experts." Really? Every single one of them? And yet Apple's own people are using them?

     

    I would caution people to read some of this web sites introductory wording, particularly:

     

    This site contains user submitted content, comments and opinions and is for informational purposes only. Apple disclaims any and all liability for the acts, omissions and conduct of any third parties in connection with or related to your use of the site.

     

    From a logical point of view, what's the diffference between someone that takes a set of software programs and dismisses them all as "junk," "trash," or "dangerous," based on one or two bad applications and an individual that meets one "bad" person of a specific race, color, or creed, and then reaches the conclusion that every single person of that partiiclar race, color, or creed must likewise be bad.

     

    Thinking of this nature is not the sign of keen intellect, it's the sign of simple mindedness. I would recommend users read and remember the quotes from Apple above. If some of this sites "experts" were true experts, they wouldn't be posting on a site like this, they'd be Apple employees.

  • Kurt Lang Level 7 Level 7 (31,535 points)

    Really? Every single one of them? And yet Apple's own people are using them?

    Who said all? Not me. Read my post again. I said DIskWarrior has saved many users' data. TechTool Pro and Drive Genius have their legitimate uses the OS doesn't supply. I happen to own all three. And as I stated, they only get used occasionally, but I sure am glad I have them when I need one of them.

     

    MacKeeper on the other hand is a badly written piece of junk that has done a very good job destroying Mac users' computers, when it isn't just plain slowing them down to a crawl. I doubt you'd find any real Mac expert recommending it.

  • ThomasB2010 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I don't visit this site much, but from what I can tell, one thing about MacKeeper is for sure: It seems to bring out the worst in people. I notice this discussion has been "branched out" to another discussion - God only knows what's going on in there. In my opinion, MacKeeper's aggressive marketing tactics are not an asset to them.

     

    As an FYI, Apple doesn't "recommend" any third party products to anyone to the best of my knowledge unless they explicitly have a contract of some type with them. In my opinion they don't want to be held liable for anything associated with anything they have no control over, and they don't want to be accused of showing favoritism to one vendor over another. They could get sued for doing that. This is common in business.

     

    A word about legal liabilty may be in order for people posting on this site. If an individual wishes to criticize a product, or toss every single third party product into a generic (garbage) class, it's best to preface it with the phrase "In my opinion." By doing so, you're identifying what's being said as an opinion, rather than fact. If you don't do so, you can be held legally libel for slander. An opinion is an opinion, and there's a world of difference between someone stating something like "In my opinion every piece of third party software is garbage" and someone stating "Every piece of third party sofware is garbage." Law allows people to have opinions (at least in America, it does) but if the statement being made implies "facts," particularly the implication of facts without any testing or experience at all with the product in question, it can literally be viewed as slander.

     

    I should add, my comments are not directed at any specific posters in this thread or on this site. It isn't uncommon for people to post their opinions on web sites, but without the "In my opinion" preface, they really do stand a chance of being held liable in the event some company ends up losing business because of poorly worded comments that a potential client may use against them to do something like cancel a massive order. Think, people, think before you speak.

     

    With that said, in my opinion, I think the list of reliable drive testing tools provided by "MrJavaDeveloper" in his link above is a really great list. Discard all the MacKeeper and other off topic related comments in that link and you find it was written by an individual that actually took the time to do unbiased research into the products available for Macs and drive testing, even though he's made it clear he uses one of them. It's no wonder that if you do a Google for something like "Mac hard drive testing software" this shows up as one of the top hits. Kudos to you, ZVH, whoever you are.

     

    We need more stuff like that on the web, not generalizations, stereotypes, or SPAM.

     

    Just my opinions, people. Don't lose sleep over them.

  • Fred1956 Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    What does "Branched to a new discussion mean?" When I click on that link it says something about not being authorized. Is the thread deleted, has it been censored, are there "priviate" types of membership here?

  • Kurt Lang Level 7 Level 7 (31,535 points)

    If a link to another topic results in an error message, it means the hosts here have removed it.

  • ZV137 Level 1 Level 1 (20 points)

    While the rest of the message was still around, I was getting e-mail updates on it. It got quite intense, especially after someone got onto the thread and said MacKeeper was recommended by Apple (DO NOT RESPOND TO THAT COMMENT...IT'S AN EXAMPLE OF WHAT I SAW)

     

    I think on this site if you see a MacKeeper post, run from it as fast as possible.

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