Previous 1 47 48 49 50 51 Next 1,011 Replies Latest reply: Aug 18, 2014 1:09 AM by vela21.cf Go to original post Branched to a new discussion.
  • TJBUSMC1973 Level 5 Level 5 (7,310 points)

    Prokhozhy wrote:

     

    TJBUSMC1973 wrote:

    Haters gonna hate.  Doesn't change reality.

    To TJBUSMC1973: You have just insulted a lot of people who are (or have been until recently) loyal to Apple, who loved their iPhones, and who are now experiencing FRUSTRATION, not HATE, because they have been duped into buying defective devices (there seems to be a consensus regarding the faulty wifi chip), and are now being ignored by the manufacturer who is engaged in spin-doctoring a bad situation at their cost rather than recognizing the problem and dealing with it (that's the REALITY).

    To everybody else: Just a reminder that TJBUSMC1973's lack of empathy for the victims may derive from the fact that (according to his/her profile) his/her devices are still running on iOS 6.

     

    Thanks for the reminder, Prok.  I hadn't updated that in a long time.  I'd actually been running iOS 7 on my iPhone 4 for a few months, just never updated my profile.

     

    The reality is that you bought a device with a one-year warranty.  It functioned properly for one year.  Your warranty was fulfilled. 

     

    Do I think that Apple should have a longer, built-in warranty?  Absolutely.  But ranting and yelling about it on this forum does absolutely nothing (other than make you feel better by venting your frustration).

     

    If all you want is to vent, okay.  Keep going.  If you want something to actually CHANGE, then take more appropriate action.  Give feedback to Apple.  Use apple.com/feedback.  Write a letter to Apple.  If you're a shareholder, express your opinion on the matter through those channels (as I have).

     

    Claiming you have some sort of right that isn't supported by any documentation is pointless.  You want change?  Go take appropriate action to promote that change.  This forum isn't the place for it.

     

    Bin Kroon wrote:

     

    Somehow with what he is saying, (it's the fault of the customer since we did not buy extended warranty) I am starting to believe more and more TJ----73 is just an alias used by Tim Cook, and it's just Tim Cook giving us his opinion on Apple customers...  ;-)

    I wish I had Tim Cook's money!

     

    I'm an Apple customer, just like you Bin.  Stop with the conspiracy theories.  Besides, if I was Tim Cook, then why wouldn't I just block your access to apple.com and void your Apple ID? 

  • TJBUSMC1973 Level 5 Level 5 (7,310 points)

    Pererau wrote:

     

    I found a solution to my problem. Nothing I have tried was working, so I went into a Verizon store. I am writing this on a Galaxy Note 3. My friends are all shocked, thinking I would never leave Apple. I'm shocked too. But hey, now my wifi works just fine. I'm glad I was able to find a solution to this problem, despite Apple not thinking they could help me.

     

    Galaxy Note 3 is a good device.  I hope you enjoy it!

  • Bin Kroon Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Hi Acesinica,

     

    You are right. On a personal level, your advice is best to be followed.

    So mixed in emotions, but your point makes enough sense. :-)

     

    Regards,

    Bin

  • acesinica Level 2 Level 2 (155 points)

    To bikic13,

     

    Very well then, do what you like about the phone. Ease up, it's just a phone. Pick your battles. Can you prove cause and effect in court? Then go for it. If not, then choose a new phone wisely this time. Life goes on.

  • Bin Kroon Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I made a few polite enough remarks on you actually, and they were immediately (within minutes) removed......

     

    So your call...  ;-)

     

    And it is not conspiracy theories, no worries there, but mostly as others have said your response to others postings, and your strong support of the Apple corp. to the extend that it almost seems like in your opinion all faults are the customers responsibility since we should all have purchased extended warranty, while you seem to be defending the manufacturer. People here are frustrated and with your remarks you add oil to the fire. It just is not helpful.

  • amandielynn Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I just tried this yesterday after being at the Genius bar. It didn't work. I'm very disappointed in Apple telling all of us that have contacted them that is a hardware problem and we need to replace the equipment.

  • amandielynn Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    It doesn't. I updated iTunes yesterday and then tried. Even the restore failed and all my music is gone.

  • maggiedrum Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    The plot thickens.  I got wifi on today.  This will sound lame but I can't remember where I found someone's directions on how to get wifi working.  The original list did not work but someone posted an additional step and it worked.  Remember though, my wifi worked (not grayed out) on Tuesday too and then when I got home it quit (grayed out).  So I will have to wait and see if it will fail again.

     

    Here's what I did:

    1.  Turned off Airplane Mode (if on)

    2.  Turn Cellular Data off

    3.  Reset Network Settings via General, Reset, Reset Network Settings

    4.  Wifi was up and running and immediately picked up my home network

     

    After it was up I tested it by opening up Safari and going to a website.  I don't see any problems right now.

     

    I am NOT convinced that this is a solution yet because of (a) I tried pretty much everything multiple times before and (b) everyone else seems to still have the problem.

     

    I AM convinced that Apple is lame on this issue:  the iOS "upgrade" is the villian on this, and, Apple still has not address what is beyond a doubt obvious problem - because the procedure they give for this did not work for me nor most on this thread.

     

    I will keep you posted.  BTW - if in fact the hardware is damaged from this iOS deal then Apple will feel the wrath of me and thousands of others.  This is not one of those "isolated" issues.  My 12 month warranty expired 4 weeks ago and I have 11 months to go unless I want to pay AT&T an ETF.  If I bought a replacement phone for $198 I would not want to have iOS 7 on it.  And Acesinica, I understand why you may be happy with being screwed by this because of your "investment", but I don't feel the same way.  If Apple doesn't fix this one way or the other then they will lose market share even faster than they are and I will be one of the ones who help that along.  The one month over my warranty would cost me $198 and I would still not be convinced that my new 4S would be reliable.  This is a game changer.

  • TJBUSMC1973 Level 5 Level 5 (7,310 points)

    Bin Kroon wrote:

     

    I made a few polite enough remarks on you actually, and they were immediately (within minutes) removed......

     

    So your call...  ;-)

     

    And it is not conspiracy theories, no worries there, but mostly as others have said your response to others postings, and your strong support of the Apple corp. to the extend that it almost seems like in your opinion all faults are the customers responsibility since we should all have purchased extended warranty, while you seem to be defending the manufacturer. People here are frustrated and with your remarks you add oil to the fire. It just is not helpful.

     

    I'm a proponent of adhering to agreements that were entered into by both parties willingly.  Changing the terms of a contract after established is optional, not required.  That's whether it's a purchase agreement, a rental agreement, a loan agreement, etc.

     

    It's not Apple specifically.  We could be talking about the warranty of a Samsung device, and I'd say the same thing.  We could be talking about a Bose speaker, and I'd say the same thing.

     

    I'm not placing blame for the device failure on the customers.  Nowhere did I say that.  What I said was that DEMANDING a resolution from the manufacturer, instead of REQUESTING one, is unwise. 

  • cheng_zh Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Ok I ve done followings and my wifi is back. Turn iphone off, Put iPhone in a seal plastic bag and put into refrigerator for 10min. Then turn on, set it into airplane mode, reset network setting. After this, my iPhone can find wireless and can get connection. Need to input wireless password again if required. Hope it woks forever since this is my replaced iPhone for the previously one which got wifi control bar grey off and could not be fixed. Apple just simply give me a new one with 3 mon warranty.

  • Marcosfrag Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Hi, my wifi today came back, i don´t known how this happen, the only thing i known is that i tried everything i read in the web, in this forums, in youtube.... and nothing work things out, suddenly today mi wifi is back and i don´t know what just happen......

  • 380gt Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    IOS7 IS MADE TO GIVE PROBLEMS TO ALL USERS 4 AND 4S IS A NIGHTMARE TRICK OR TREAT APPLE lol

  • 380gt Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    way to go apple i'm going to get me a real phone tomorrow , you should stop playing with toys and start making phones !!

  • Prokhozhy Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    TJBUSMC1973 wrote:

     

    The reality is that you bought a device with a one-year warranty.  It functioned properly for one year.  Your warranty was fulfilled.

     

    1. Forget about warranty, it is irrelevant at this point. The reality is that, unbeknownst to me, Apple apparently sold me a device with a substandard wifi chip, which - if true - is a bad faith action. In all likelihood, the subsequent confluence of events (including the damage resulting from the heat generated by the update) would not have led to the demise of my wifi function, if the wifi chip had been "normal". I should not be coerced into paying for a hardware failure resulting from a defective component, even if the warranty covering my device has expired. Bottom line: I am left with a functionally impaired device which was deficient ab origine. The existence of a hidden defect makes the duration of the warranty completely irrelevant.

    2. The quality of iOS 7 remains a moot point. Apple and its apologists seem to be resorting to a "logical fallacy" defense - the famous post hoc ergo propter hoc argument - asserting that the fact that the failure occurred AFTER the update allegedly does not mean that it occurred BECAUSE of the update. Well, I think that defense is not viable because of the massive nature of the failure which eliminates the possibility of it being coincidental. Bottom line: the quality of iOS 7 remain highly suspect.

    3. Bottom-bottom line: Apple sold me a phone which may well have been defective from the start (Bad Faith Action No. 1), and its deficiency has transpired after I installed an operaing system which may well have been defective (Bad Faith Action No. 2), and EXPIRED WARRANTY HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH IT. On the contrary, Apple's "it's-not-my-problem" attitude has everything to do with it, and its lack of action is infuriating.

  • Prokhozhy Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    TJBUSMC1973 wrote:

    I'm a proponent of adhering to agreements that were entered into by both parties willingly.
    I am all for keeping promises and adhering to agreements, too. However, the key question here is whether the wifi chip in iPhone 4S devices was defective from the start. If it was, and if Apple was aware of it (and they seem to have implicitly admitted it by saying that it was the heat from the update that fried the chip), then such device should not have been sold in the first place. I willingly entered into the sale contract relying on Apple's guarantee (express or implied) that the device I was buying was fully functional and compliant with industry standards. The sale of a device with a hidden effect constitutes an event of default, and I am no longer obliged to adhere to that agreement. In simple words, all bets are off. So if Apple was not aware of the defect, it should help its customers by replacing defective phones and then seek redress from the chip manufacturer. If Apple was aware of the defect and knowingly sold (and keeps selling) substandard phones, well, I believe this case has great civil liability potential in a class action.

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