Previous 1 2 Next 14 Replies Latest reply: Sep 23, 2013 2:36 PM by Old Toad
_pk Level 1 Level 1

While it can happen on any devices, my happened on a MacBook pro.  The end user sold it in the aftermarket, I bought it through the middleman.  While the unit had been "wiped" (not completely -- I discovered the first owner's contact data through file reconstruction), a remote wipe ended up happening from the original users active iCloud account (first user denies initiating the remote wipe).


MacBook Pro
  • Old Toad Level 10 Level 10
    expertise.photosformac
    Photos for Mac

    It's really the original owner's responsibility to prepare the Mac properly.  If the Mac came with Snow Leopard or earlier originally installed the disks that came with the Mac should have been included with the machine.  Then the new owner can run the installation disks to wipe the HD and install a new system. 

     

    With a machine that came with Lion or Mt. Lion preinstalled it's important to verify that the disk had been prepared according to  one of the links below so that you know you're getting a pristine system.

     

    This Apple documen:;  What to do before selling or giving away your Mac

     

    3rd party sites:

     

    Selling your old Mac? Prepare it first | MacFixIt - CNET Reviews

     

    Preparing an old Mac for sale | Macworld

     

    How to Prepare a Used Mac for Sale — Tech News and Analysis

     

    OT

  • _pk Level 1 Level 1

    True, but not useful from a Vendor accountability standpoint.  The vendor has the capability to wipe out someone's data without verification. 

  • Csound1 Level 8 Level 8
    expertise.desktops
    Desktops

    The previous owner is the vendor.

  • _pk Level 1 Level 1

    Apple's servers initiate the Wipe.  Their actions are destructive.  They should be certain what they're dealing with, irrespective of other's responsibilities.  It's not a matter of OR, it's a matter of AND.

  • Csound1 Level 8 Level 8
    expertise.desktops
    Desktops

    Apple provide security services, the previous owner decides whether to use them or not, the new owner is responsible for ensuring that the machine is correctly registered with iCloud. Did you, or did you just leave it as it came?

  • Michael Black Level 7 Level 7

    From a purley practical point of view, how could Apple possible monitor private party sales and know which ones are legitimate transfers of ownership and which are not?  In your case, a computer changed hands, but how is Apple supposed to even know such an event took place?

     

    Once Apple sells it the first time, it is not really their responsibility afterwards.  Private party sales are just that, business between two private parties and quite frankly, none of anyone else's business nor anyone else's responsibility.  Add to that the fact, as I say, how on earth could a company be held responsible for monitoring or tracking such events?

  • _pk Level 1 Level 1

    Perhaps they can't, but then how is the buyer supposed to know when a random wipe event from an owner they don't know is initiated via Apple's servers?  This is a service problem, and saying "Apple shouldn't have to care, they can wipe at will" probably only comes from people who arent exposed to the downside, and are only concerned with the upside or the engineering challenges.

     

    Apple *needs* to care because they charge a premium for their products, and screwing the aftermarket means potentially less primary sales, because the resell values will plummet.  Why should I buy a used product if I'm subject to a random data-destruction event?  Perhaps I'll buy something from Samsung instead.

  • _pk Level 1 Level 1

    Blame the victim.  I'm looking for a solution.  You're defense of Apple isn't helping me or anyone else.

  • Michael Black Level 7 Level 7

    It just seems an unreasonable expectation.  Apple cannot possible monitor private sales, so at some point the onus falls on the seller and buyer.  Or would you prefer Apple offer no security features to its customers at all?

     

    I do not want companies playing big brother and watching our every moves, every transaction, every keystroke we make with every device.  In order to have personal privacy and freedom, I accept that at some point, at least some responsibility must fall on me.  It just seems to me your are taking things to a wholly impractical extreme.  How can Apple possible know when you and someone else, anywhere on the planet, decide to exchange goods?

  • _pk Level 1 Level 1

    ????  It's unreasonable not to expect my data won't be randomly destroyed without notice?

     

    HTF is that impracticable?

     

    The fact that my data was destroyed was *because* apple had some sort of beacon monitoring my activity that I DIDN"T REQUEST, I didn't know about, I had no way of knowing about.  

     

    I fail to see how this is me failing to be resonable. 

  • Csound1 Level 8 Level 8
    expertise.desktops
    Desktops

    Can I assume that you don't keep backups of your data either?

  • _pk Level 1 Level 1

    Blame the victim seems to be your model.  Why should I HAVE TO RESTORE?  Why should I have to go to the apple store to get my Logic board unlocked, only to be denied, and have to figure out how to get the think unlocked by myself, when I bought a legitimate resale? 

     

    You answers are anti-helpful.  I've heard your opinion.  Either answer the quesitons I'm asking or keep your rude comments to yourself.

  • Michael Black Level 7 Level 7

    _pk wrote:

     

    ????  It's unreasonable not to expect my data won't be randomly destroyed without notice?

     

    HTF is that impracticable?

     

    The fact that my data was destroyed was *because* apple had some sort of beacon monitoring my activity that I DIDN"T REQUEST, I didn't know about, I had no way of knowing about.  

     

    I fail to see how this is me failing to be resonable. 

     

    I never said it was your fault, or at least not just you.  Clearly the original owner did not do what they really should have done in preparing the device for sale.  But again, how could Apple possible even know that?  They sold a machine to person X, at some point in time, and that is ALL they know.  Person X decides to sell it privately to person Y at some later timepoint.  How is Apple expected to have any knowledge of that AT ALL?  How could they possible look up and say "oh, mister X just sold his computer and forgot to wipe it clear of all his personal information, we should call the new owner (whoever that might be) and let them know.".

  • Csound1 Level 8 Level 8
    expertise.desktops
    Desktops

    Why can't you restore your backup, after you have correctly setup the machine (and removing it from an account that is not yours). Do you have a backup, yes or no.

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