5 Replies Latest reply: Nov 17, 2013 11:34 PM by Roger Wilmut1
Desiree Kennedy Level 1 Level 1

I don't have iCloud in my system preferences, I am using 10.6.8 how do I see how much storage I am using and how do I purchase more?


MacBook Pro, Mac OS X (10.6.8)
  • pvonk Level 6 Level 6

    Your mac is not compatible with icloud, you need OSX 10.7.5 or higher and a compatible mac.  But you can access icloud using the mac's browser, go to icloud.com and log in.  Then under your name, look for system info.

  • Desiree Kennedy Level 1 Level 1

    I don't see "system info" at all

     

    I have been accessing my email via icloud.com because using the Mail program on my mac book- as of 4 months ago I can get mail I can't send mail.

    I know this is more ploys to get me to upgrade- but when I do I will loose iPhoto (which I use a lot)

    and I will loose my Microsoft Word Suite (it will cost $300.00 to make it compatable with the next operating system)

     

    I am self employed- this will be a hardship.  Loosing use of my main email address will be a major problem too.

     

    I feel I'm in a corner! 

  • Roger Wilmut1 Level 9 Level 9
    expertise.itunes
    iTunes

    You can't check your usage on the iCloud website - you have to do this from the iCloud prefs pane, which you don't have. If you are only using it for email you would have to be storing an awful lot of messages to exceed 5GB. If you are concerned about this you can download some of them to your Mac and off iCloud.

     

    To do this simply create a folder under 'On My Mac', go to the iCloud mailbox, select some of the messages and drag them to the folder you created. Don't try to do too many at once (say more than 100) and allow time for them to download.

     

    If you haven't yet set Mail up to access iCloud, but are simply using the website, you can set it up as detailed here:

     

    Entering iCloud email settings manually in Snow Leopard or Leopard

     

    If you do decide to upgrade, the latest version of iPhoto is only £10.49, though MS Office is more of a problem. But you can go on as you are as long as your Mac holds out - Snow Leopard is a good solid system.

  • intinstr Level 1 Level 1

    Desiree, you can purchase Parallels and set up partitions (quite easily) that allow you to use older OS X even if you upgrade to a later system.  That way you can continue to use programs that no longer work in the newer systems.

  • Roger Wilmut1 Level 9 Level 9
    expertise.itunes
    iTunes

    intinstr wrote:

     

    Desiree, you can purchase Parallels and set up partitions (quite easily) that allow you to use older OS X even if you upgrade to a later system.  That way you can continue to use programs that no longer work in the newer systems.

    it isn't quite that easy, though it can be done. It may be easier simply to either use an external hard disk or partition the existing one and install Snow Leopard on it; this will require rebooting of course but is the easiest way of maintaining a Snow Leopard boot.

     

    Success has been reported in running Snow Leopard under emulation in Parallels - the method is described here: it seems complex; however Snow Leopard Server is available in the Apple Store (by telephone) at a reduced price and this makes the process a lot easier. I haven't tried either method: use at your own discretion.