8 Replies Latest reply: Mar 9, 2014 5:15 PM by ls2011
GAB449 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

I installed Octave 3.4.0 on my Mac Pro (16 GB, 512 Flash).  But when I open the app, I get a window with white background with the text below.  The cursor is a the end of [Process completed].  But I am not able enter anything.  

 

Last login: Tue Oct 15 20:54:30 on ttys000

exec '/Applications/Octave.app/Contents/Resources/bin/octave'

ABCs-MacBook-Pro:~ ABC$ exec '/Applications/Octave.app/Contents/Resources/bin/octave'

[Process completed]


MacBook Pro
  • GAB449 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I am running OS X Mountain Lion

  • Elaine Morrison Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Can you use the Octave 3.6 installed via homebrew in your terminal? If you have problems with the gnu make a file called .octaverc and add the command setenv GNUTERM x11 

    It works for me after Mavericks stopped my easy-install lower octave and gnu dmgs like you, which were running on Mountain Lion. There are other fixes for the gnuplot but that was the simplest one which I could get to work.

  • GAB449 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I am sorry, I don't understand your instructions.  I am new to Mac from Windows and things are different here.  I tried homebrew but it says Octave 3.6.4 is already installed.  Octave used to open till I upgraded to Mavericks but now I am back to my original problem below.

     

     

    When I open Octave, I get a window with white background with the text below.  The cursor is a the end of [Process completed].  But I am not able enter anything.   

     

    Last login: Sun Oct 27 20:54:30 on ttys000

    exec '/Applications/Octave.app/Contents/Resources/bin/octave'

    ABCs-MacBook-Pro:~ ABC$ exec '/Applications/Octave.app/Contents/Resources/bin/octave'

    [Process completed]

  • Elaine Morrison Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Darn. So you have both versions like me. However, the 3.6 works for me. When you open a terminal (applications -> utilities -> terminal - which looks like a little black TV) and type octave it just closes up on you? Or did you click on the octave sombrero app which is still the 3.4 which doesn't open for me either? If homebrew confirmed the installation the terminal should open it for you, unless there is something else missing to install...which I thought homebrew would have found, and it may not have installed without it.

    > octave

     

    Once you get octave to work from the terminal, fix the gnuplot by making the file to direct octave to use x11 (I think that's what it does) by typing nano .octaverc into the terminal. You'll get a file window where you type setenv GNUTERM x11 and press control-x like the exit commands on the bottom, say y to save the file with the filename you gave it, and when you use octave to graph stuff the gnu window should pop up. Nano means opening up the file (in a text editor) which you then name a space afterward. You can use nano to go back into a file and correct the typing inside too.

    > nano .octaverc

     

    ...

    setenv GNUTERM x11

    ...

  • mak10 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I was also facing the same issue. Octave used to work great till I upgraded to OSX Maverick.

     

    When I used to type octave in Terminal, I would get the following error message:

     

    -bash: octave: command not found
    

     

    I then entered the complete path to the octave bin file inside /Applications/Octave.app/Contents/Resources/bin/octave. I was greeted by the following dialog.

     

    Screen Shot 2013-11-03 at 11.45.35 am.png

     

    Clicking on continue took me to this Apple Knowledge Base page - http://support.apple.com/kb/HT5293 - which says:

     

    "X11 is not included with Mountain Lion, but X11 server and client libraries for OS X Mountain Lion are available from the XQuartz project: http://xquartz.macosforge.org. You should use XQuartz version 2.7.2 or later."

     


    Funnily, I already have XQuartz 2.7.4 installed on my MBP.

     

    I also noticed that the /Applications/Utilities folder there were two apps - X11.app and XQuartz.app.

     

    I then decided to reinstall XQuartz and that was it . The re-installation removed X11.app and octave is back up now.

  • GAB449 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Thanks for replying,  I had clicked on the Sombrero icon earlier .  I tried your suggestion (applications -> utilities -> terminal).  It brings up a new window which I think is the Octave app but it looks like the terminal.  Since I am new to both Mac and Octave, it's difficult for me to distinguish the problem between the two. 

     

    Elaine Morrison wrote:

     

    Darn. So you have both versions like me. However, the 3.6 works for me. When you open a terminal (applications -> utilities -> terminal - which looks like a little black TV) and type octave it just closes up on you? Or did you click on the octave sombrero app which is still the 3.4 which doesn't open for me either? If homebrew confirmed the installation the terminal should open it for you, unless there is something else missing to install...which I thought homebrew would have found, and it may not have installed without it.

    > octave

     

    Once you get octave to work from the terminal, fix the gnuplot by making the file to direct octave to use x11 (I think that's what it does) by typing nano .octaverc into the terminal. You'll get a file window where you type setenv GNUTERM x11 and press control-x like the exit commands on the bottom, say y to save the file with the filename you gave it, and when you use octave to graph stuff the gnu window should pop up. Nano means opening up the file (in a text editor) which you then name a space afterward. You can use nano to go back into a file and correct the typing inside too.

    > nano .octaverc

     

    ...

    setenv GNUTERM x11

    ...

  • Elaine Morrison Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    From the terminal you can access many different languages. As far as I know, that's the central controller of your entire computer, so don't type in things you haven't researched. If you need new code to do things, cross-check on different sites for the same code, use more the sites you trust, and look up each piece of command for what it means so you know basically what you're going to do. There are also command explanations accessed inside the terminal window by typing that command (different depending on the language you're inside at that moment). Octave is just help ___ . If you're accessing your computer in general, by installing octave via homebrew for eg, it's the bash terminal. Check its commands by man ____ . 

     

    Type octave and you'll get the 3.6 installed with homebrew. You'll know what you're in b/c when that environment comes up you'll get the octave version info. spiel. It should also have an 'octave >' cursor. You can also tell by it's acceptance of octave commands. If you were in the regular bash terminal only bash types of commands would work. It also says the type of environment on the top label of the terminal window. You most likely won't hurt your computer by attempting a different language command in the wrong environment. It'll just bring up an error message.

     

    Python 2.7.5 is also auto-installed on Mac. Type python and you'll get that environment. If you need a quick simple calculator (for eg) bring up python. But octave is a more powerful complex math tool. If you use the default bash terminal you won't be able to perform simple arithmetic easily. The syntax is different for different languages.

  • ls2011 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Mac10, I found your suggestions very helpful and was able to get Octave working on Lion after installing XQuartz. Thanks