Previous 1 2 3 Next 70 Replies Latest reply: Jun 8, 2015 12:25 PM by shuvrorc
hiddenmuse Level 3 Level 3 (970 points)

Since I have updated to OS X Mavericks, QuickTime 10 will no longer play AVI files. Instead, it takes HOURS to convert them into MOV files. Obviously, this is annoying and not going to work.

 

I downloaded QuickTime 7, but I hate the look of it and would much prefer to watch video files in QuickTime 10, if it's still possible.

 

Is there a way to tell QuickTime to not convert AVI files to MOVs? Or was this removed with Mavericks?


OS X Mavericks (10.9), 15" early 2011 2.2GHz Intel Core i7
  • Jon Walker Level 6 Level 6 (18,190 points)

    Since I have updated to OS X Mavericks, QuickTime 10 will no longer play AVI files. Instead, it takes HOURS to convert them into MOV files. Obviously, this is annoying and not going to work.

     

    I downloaded QuickTime 7, but I hate the look of it and would much prefer to watch video files in QuickTime 10, if it's still possible.

     

    Is there a way to tell QuickTime to not convert AVI files to MOVs? Or was this removed with Mavericks?

    Your statements and question represent quite a conundrum. On the one hand you want a thoroughly modern-looking, streamlined media player that is capable of handling the latest forms of high definition compression but on the other, wish to retain compatibility with decades old legacy formats which are no longer officially supported by their originators while distancing yourself from the classic QT version which was designed to support these same formats. Thus, for years the handwriting has been on the wall and video experts have recommended that AVI users update their content to more modern file container types supporting more efficient and more highly scalable compression formats. Unfortunately, for the most part, users have ignored this advice complaining that this required too much time and effort and, as a result, simply continued to expand their video library collections dispite the fact it only increased the amount of time and effort required to convert their content when eventially forced to do so. To me, this is tantamount to continuing to build a VHS or Beta-max library and then complaing that the tapes won't play on your DVD or BD video player. While it is impossible to say that this is Apple's first shot at deliberately attempting to close the door on legacy content in preparation for an eventual release of even more modern, higher definition future media players (i.e., 4K could be just around the corner), it does seem to imply that users continuing to employ file types and compression format combinations that are not already fully compatible with QT X are now being pushed in the direction of converting at least some of their content to "native" compatibility under Mavericks.

     

    In any case, I have yet to find any way of, as you say, "telling QT to not convert AVI files to MOVs." At this point I am still in the process of mapping how QT X v10.3's conversion routines work. My only real complaint at this point is that this feature starts automatically and does not allow me to customize any of the target parameters (such as encode matrix/display dimensions). In fact, I found it quite interesting that a compression combination like Motion JPEG/DVI ADPCM in an AVI file container is not converted at all and still plays fine the original container. Also of interest was the fact that H.263/MP3 FLV files convert directly to H.264/AAC MOV files but the same data in an MOV file container only converts the video to .264 while passing the original MP3 data through to the target MOV file container. Also while BD H.264/DTS conversion from MKV or MOV file containers is not supported by QT X v10.3, but it will pass through the video and convert the DTS audio when contained in independent MOV files but the AAC 5.1 audio is not playable since the QT X v10.3/Perian conversion routine only allocates about 7 Kbps of bandwith to the target audio. As you can see, there is still a lot to be learned and I estimate it will be quite a while yet before your question can be properly answerend. In the meantime, you can convert or not convert, use an alternative player or not, or simply sit back and wait as you may choose.

     

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  • hiddenmuse Level 3 Level 3 (970 points)

    I just figured out that Perian is actually the issue here. Apparently QuickTime never natively played AVI files, and using Perian is what allowed me to play them before. But Perian hasn't been updated for Mavericks support (it hasn't been updated in years), so now the files aren't playing.

     

    I hope either Perian updates or someone comes up with a plugin like it to allow AVI files to play in QuickTime. Until then, I'll use VLC (despite it not being as clean as QuickTime 10).

     

    While one day I might take the time to convert all of my older video files to MOVs or MP4s, it would be nice to be able to play them in QuickTime as I have up until now. VLC will have to suffice until then.

  • Jon Walker Level 6 Level 6 (18,190 points)

    I just figured out that Perian is actually the issue here. Apparently QuickTime never natively played AVI files, and using Perian is what allowed me to play them before. But Perian hasn't been updated for Mavericks support (it hasn't been updated in years), so now the files aren't playing.

    Actually, the AVI file container was and still is QT compatible under Mavericks. In most cases it is the audio and video compression formats that require Perian to be installed for proper playback. Unfortunatly I do not normally use AVI files and to date have only come across the Motion JPEG/DVI ADPCM AVI file/format combination (an old, commonly available digital camera file format sent to me for analysis) is still QL/QTX v10.3 compatible without conversion.

     

     

    I hope either Perian updates or someone comes up with a plugin like it to allow AVI files to play in QuickTime. Until then, I'll use VLC (despite it not being as clean as QuickTime 10)

    Perian project personnel have already indicated there will not be any further updates (probably due to the closed nature of QT X as opposed to QT 7) but their last offering still remains QT 7 compatible under Mavericks.

     


    While one day I might take the time to convert all of my older video files to MOVs or MP4s, it would be nice to be able to play them in QuickTime as I have up until now. VLC will have to suffice until then.

    I personally prefer using the X264 codec with either QT 7 Pro or as emplemented in Handbrake to make conversions. This codec offers a greater number of features and is normally (depending on features/settings used) much faster.

     

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  • trevo123 Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    I hadn't tried out any of my AVI content with QT until a friend told me of this issue. After the disappointing results, I naturally went looking for advice.

     

    Personally I wouldn't take the time to write something that long in defense of screwing customers out of an option simply because you and "video experts" think that AVI files are a dated format in need of being put down, and instead my response would simply be: I'd like QuickTime to support as many files as possible.

     

    Your VHS tapes example would make sense if we were dealing with a physical change, but this is software. This is more akin to buying a PS4 in 2013 and Sony issuing an update in 2014 so that you could only play games from 2014, thereby screwing you out of the games you purcahsed a year ago. The simple fact is that my computer USED to be able to do something that it no longer can, and the only thing that changed is an OS X verison number (and that should annoy you as much as everyone else). Technological advancements like Mavericks shouldn't subtract features.

     

    As it stands now, the QT release in Mavericks is buggy and barely survives scrubbing through a 200MB MP4 file without dramatic lag. In fact, before Mavericks, with Perian, QT played AVI files better than Apple's own file types. And as a paid developer, I find it very frustrating when I'm told what I should and shouldn't do my computer. Yesterday I could easily quicklook at any video file on my computer, and now I've been limited.

  • Deborah Terreson Level 4 Level 4 (1,000 points)

    I know it is easy to get bent out of shape about it, but while Apple is determined to "iOS-ify" the operating system, this is going to be a problem the more serious 'power users' have to deal with.

     

    Here's my short list to keep you up and running - with the REAL QuickTime app, not that hamstrung QTX junk.

     

    Start with QT 7.6.6. - http://support.apple.com/kb/DL923

     

    Get Perian, and install it. - http://perian.org

     

    then VLC, - http://videolan.org

     

    DivX - http://divx.com - and the

     

    Flip4Mac package from Telestream - http://www.telestream.net/flip4mac/

     

    This is what I've put into my system and so far I've gotten every file to run just ducky, even my oldest videos.

     

    In System/Library/QuickTime

         ApleIntermediateCodec.component (should already be there)

         AppleMPEG2Codec.component (optional if you paid for it)

         DivX Decoder.component

         Flip4Mac WMV Advanced.component

         Flip4Mac WMV Export.component

         Flip4Mac WMV Import.component

     

    In your Home/Library/QuickTime/

         AC3MovieImport.component

         Perian.component

     

    For AC3 sound that is in most .mkv files, you need the A52Codec.component, here: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/34821905/A52Codec.component.zip - unzip the file and put the component into the System/Library/Audio/Plug-ins/Components..

     

    Go back to your Perian settings and in the Audio Output button, set it to 'Multi Channel Sound' - Ignore the message Perian puts up and select it.

     

    By doing a 'Get Info' on your files and where it says 'Open With' and default them to the QuickTime 7 and set it so it is the default for all the files of whichever type you use, it should work perfectly. So far I've gotten ALL my old videos to play.

     

    .avi, .mov (with the AC3 sound), .wmv, .flv, .mp4 and .m4v.

     

    Regards,

  • Jon Walker Level 6 Level 6 (18,190 points)

    Personally I wouldn't take the time to write something that long in defense of screwing customers out of an option simply because you and "video experts" think that AVI files are a dated format in need of being put down, and instead my response would simply be: I'd like QuickTime to support as many files as possible.

    I respect both your opinions and your willingness or unwillingness to express them here. I was neither defending nor trying to offend Apple's position but merely express my own opinion that the AVI container is itself out of date and often employs outmoded data compression formats. If a user chooses to continue to use them, then they have a right to do so—even if it means having to "jump through more hoops" to do so. And while I agree with your position that it would be nice to retain compatibility with as many file/compression types as possible, it may not be possible to do so and still avoid the patchwork problems that plagued the classic QT software package after 10 years of development based on those very same lines or prompted the dropping of official support by the AVI originators 11 years ago. (I might also point out that QT X under Mavericks is still compatible with the AVI container and only forces conversion based on content. SEE THIS FILE. Test the previously linked file in QT X v10.3, QT 7, and QL. The question is, are the current problems with QT and QL a bug, a programming oversight, or a deliberate action by Apple.)

     

     

    Your VHS tapes example would make sense if we were dealing with a physical change, but this is software. This is more akin to buying a PS4 in 2013 and Sony issuing an update in 2014 so that you could only play games from 2014, thereby screwing you out of the games you purcahsed a year ago. The simple fact is that my computer USED to be able to do something that it no longer can, and the only thing that changed is an OS X verison number (and that should annoy you as much as everyone else). Technological advancements like Mavericks shouldn't subtract features.

    Sorry, I tend to look at things in terms of both physical and virtual realities. I.e., just because a mathematical problem has an infinite number of solutions and some of them belong to the set of imaginary numbers, I do not discount these solutions merely because I prefer to deal with solutions belonging to the set of real numbers. Again, while I can sympathize with your frusttration here, the fact remains that the AVI file type and many of the compression formats used in them are not native to QT and I don't understand why you feel that Apple should be responsible for the maintenance of third-party software that may or may not have been abandoned by their originators. In the case of abandoned software, this practice would seem to be financially irresponsible and in the case of still active software, such action would be illegal/a violation of copyright law.

     

    I also find it strange that you think I should be annoyed regarding the inability use of AVI files. I personally don't use them and so have no opinion one way or the other. My only involvement is on the analysis of files sent me and the finding of ways to view them on occasion. Since I make virtually all of my own content, it is easiest for me to target iTunes managed content for IOS/TV devices whioch are also compatible with QT X/7 based apps on my computer and shared to my online web sites. My only major point of frustration at this time is that certain common Apple compression formats are also not being properly supported under Mavericks (e.g., AIC, Animation, DV streams, PNG, certain ProiRes 422 codecs, etc.). Hence, my current question as to whether the current issues are bugs, oversights, or deliberate in nature. Unfortunately, technologicaly advances can sometimes preclude features until or unless corrected assuming the features are not mutually exclussive.

     

     

    As it stands now, the QT release in Mavericks is buggy and barely survives scrubbing through a 200MB MP4 file without dramatic lag. In fact, before Mavericks, with Perian, QT played AVI files better than Apple's own file types. And as a paid developer, I find it very frustrating when I'm told what I should and shouldn't do my computer. Yesterday I could easily quicklook at any video file on my computer, and now I've been limited.

    Buggy barely describes the situation. I tend to think of it as more of a disaster. Mavericks is also now forcing Subler to generate a secondary Photo-JPEG video track which, if wrapped in an MP4 file container, is now considered "out of spec" by QT 7 and, while QL now allows the preview of multiple video tracks, will not preview the Photo-JPEG track in the MP4 container but will in an M4V file container. In short, there is siply too many things going on here to yet determine what is an intentional change and what isn't. Based on current tests, it appears that as many third-party software providers may have been caught "off base" by these changes as were ther regular users. At this point I am just hoping that all dissatisfied users are reporting all of the "BUGS" through the proper feedback channels in order to get the programmers back to work fixing things. Unfortunately with all of the noted (and as yet undiscovered QT 7 Pro editing) issues, my guess is that it will take some time and a number of revisions to correct matters—assuming they can even be corrected.

     

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  • trevo123 Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    After serious reading I have found that some people may be thinking that QuickTime in Mavericks hasn't been opened yet to development (plugin support). That would explain that QT 7 can still use plugins and play AVI files. If so, let us hope that Apple issues a major update soon, because Mavericks has left me bitterly disappointed. The only positive is that it was free, but free doesn't mean they get to break things.

  • Vincentkirk Woodnew Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Officially, QuickTime only natively plays AVI files encoded with  Motion JPEG; QuickTime won't play AVI videos encoded with DivX, XviD,  WMV and other video codecs.

     

     

    Though we can make QuickTime play more AVI types by installing  Perian component, this only works on QuickTime with Mac OS X Snow  Leopard or lower version, and it does work on QuickTime with Mac  Mavericks, Mountain Lion and Lion.

     

    In order to play any video and audio encoded AVI files in any version of  QuickTime and Mac OS X or Windows, a recommended solution is to convert  AVI to QuickTime more supported video format like MOV or MP4

  • Jon Walker Level 6 Level 6 (18,190 points)

    The only positive is that it was free, but free doesn't mean they get to break things.

    I think it is less a case of breaking things than choosing to ignore things. Obviously, if the new Mavericks QT X player can convert AVI (or other third-party) data compression formats, then it must be able to read the data but is programmed to bypass playback and send the data directly to the conversion routines. Am personally hoping that Apple may "refine" the logic routines to allow the continued playback of compression formats it already continues to support in more types of containers. For instance, DV video is supported in an MOV file container by QT X v10.3 but not supported in DV or AVI file containers. So why force QT X v10.3 conversion but continue to suport the DV and AVI file versions natively iMovie v10.0 under Mavericks?

     

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  • Jon Walker Level 6 Level 6 (18,190 points)

    Officially, QuickTime only natively plays AVI files encoded with  Motion JPEG; QuickTime won't play AVI videos encoded with DivX, XviD,  WMV and other video codecs.

    Actually, it depends on the specific media app to which you are referring. While QT X v10.3 will attempt to convert an AVI file containing DV video, the same file still plays natively in the QT 7 Player and with both import and play natively in the new iMovie v10.0 app under Mavericks. (Same is true for the DV stream file container when referring to the same three apps.)

    Though we can make QuickTime play more AVI types by installing  Perian component, this only works on QuickTime with Mac OS X Snow  Leopard or lower version, and it does work on QuickTime with Mac  Mavericks, Mountain Lion and Lion.

    Again, not quite true. While some AVI-compression format combinations may not be supported by the QT X players in Lion and Mountain Lion, others are. And, in some cases where they are not, the system will ask the user if he or she wishes to switch playback to the QT Player 7 app if installed which continues to work even under Mavericks. On top of this, media players like the new Flip Player PRO and MPEG Streamclip appear to be viable QT 7 Pro media app alternatives supported by the Mac OS X system codec component configuration to include both Apple and third-party proprietary codecs not supported by standalone media apps.

     

     

    In order to play any video and audio encoded AVI files in any version of  QuickTime and Mac OS X or Windows, a recommended solution is to convert  AVI to QuickTime more supported video format like MOV or MP4

    AVI, MOV, and MP4 are all file containers. While MP4 implies the content will normally be MPEG-4 video with AAC audio, it does not guarantee that some third-party software won't mux some incompatible data compression format in the container. In addition, both AVI and MOV file containers are generic and may contain any form of compressed data compatible with the host system on which it was created. So remember when making such conversions that playback compatibility is not determined by the container extension alone but by the continer in combination with the compressed data it may contain.

     

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  • Brianmlove Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I encounted the same issue and found an article which introduces a full step guide about how to import avi files to QuickTime on Google.

     

    Then I follow the guide and it really works. Love it.

  • Jenifersimith12 Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    Well, from the beginning, QucikTime could not play AVI natively, till now, the truth does not change. You can use the Perian to play AVI videos freely. It is OK to do so if you only want to view them on your Mac, if you want to sync the videos to your portable devices like iPhone, iPad, you can convert them to MOV, that is converting AVI to MOV, just using this MOV Converter in itunes.apple.com.

  • ajdolby Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Bottom line: how do you play an .AVI on a Mac? What free software do I have to download? I paid for the computer, there is no chance that I will pay for software to do basic functions without which there is no reason to own a computer. Being able to watch videos in common formats is one. It is the moral obligation of anyone selling a computer to package it with software so you can view any file of a common format. Put Adobe out of business and increase your market share by loading these Macs up with free software like you used to!!!!

  • hiddenmuse Level 3 Level 3 (970 points)

    I downloaded MPlayerX and it's great—I actually like it better than QuickTime now. It's free and will play .avi files without issue. You can find it in the Apple Store.

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