Previous 1 2 Next 25 Replies Latest reply: Mar 13, 2015 2:44 AM by gantenbeyn Go to original post Branched to a new discussion.
  • mark00thomas Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    There is jugling to do. I had to make the following symbolic links, replacing these folders, which administrators don't have the permission to do intuitivly.

     

    ~/Desktop

    ~/Documents

    ~/Downloads

    ~/Library/Application Support

    ~/Library/Caches

    ~/Library/iTunes

    ~/Library/Logs

    ~/Library/Mail

    ~/Library/Messages

    ~/Library/Receipts

    ~/Movies

    ~/Music

    ~/Pictures

    ~/Public

     

    So making and maintaining 14 symbolic links, decrypting a boot volume and external RAID (11TB data together) and finaly reinstalling OSX should be expected to keep my data accessable on a $5,000 Mac and $2,000 LaCie drive?

     

    The Op, myself, and many others have ran into the same problem, showing that:

     

    1. There is not an user firendly solution to Mac Users Storage problems (esp if they want to use FileVault).
    2. There is not a "best practice" method documented at Apple or anywhere that is comprehinsive.
    3. There are many missleading "guides" online by fly-by-night bloggers. I have found three threads plus myself who got into this predicament by following one of these guides.

     

    Maybe I should only use this computer, which can process petaflops of data, just to check Facebook and Twitter ....

  • jedlh Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Please tell me your rationale for redirecting all these to a traditional HDD, makes zero sense:

     

    ~/Library/Application Support

    ~/Library/Caches

    ~/Library/iTunes

    ~/Library/Logs

    ~/Library/Mail

    ~/Library/Messages

    ~/Library/Receipts

    ~/Public

    ~/Desktop

     

    ~/Music (it's unecessary to redirect this entire folder, infact, it makes more sense that itunes db's stay on the SSD & only the iTunes Media folder be redirected)

     

    It's simple, the overwhelming evidence out there screams, don't move entire home dir, read around enough & you'll come to the same conclusion.

    If you're talking about moving it to an ext. (& much larger) SSD or SSD RAID, then sure, go crazy, just be sure to create an emergency admin user acct on the boot drive.

  • mark00thomas Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    The reason is that my Library is over 300GB, and 99% of it is those folders.

     

    As for iTunes Then you could just move the iTunes Media folder.

     

    I am done folks, goodnight and goodbye!

  • mark00thomas Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I don't mean to sound crass, but do you work at Ap ple? The right answer is not to dodge the question. At least guide the person to the right question, if not the solution.

     

    If I asked my IT guy how to I move this folder and he told me not to worry that I could just buy a HD/SSD large enough that I would not need to move data, I would fire him on the spot with extreme pregidous.

  • jedlh Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    It doesn't work that way, it depends on the nature of the files in Qn, not just the entire size of the dir or sub-dir, SSD will do infinitely better dealing with file types in many of those dirs you've redirected.

     

    Yes, for iTunes it's easy to redirect "in app", redirecting the entire Music folder is too clunky when there's already an in-app solution that redirects the files/dirs that benefit most from redirection, unless you use other apps which make use of the same Music root directory, & they don't have an in-app redirection.

  • jedlh Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    mark00thomas wrote:

     

    I don't mean to sound crass, but do you work at Ap ple? The right answer is not to dodge the question. At least guide the person to the right question, if not the solution.

     

    If I asked my IT guy how to I move this folder and he told me not to worry that I could just buy a HD/SSD large enough that I would not need to move data, I would fire him on the spot with extreme pregidous.

     

    Nah, not at all, nice if you to make the rude insinuation though...

     

    I've given a process (well, much of it was lost in my original post thanks to this forum sw), you can chose to follow it or not, it's slightly different for everyone, there's no such thing as a complete answer, just a process that can be followed.

     

    Many of the dirs you're looking at redirecting are wasted on a HDD, in sum-total they may be large, but most of the files contained within are better on a SSD.

    It all comes down to appreciating the I/O characteristics of HDD/SSD's, & the nature of the files (& how they're used) in each of the main dirs.

  • Hans D. Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

    Hi, having had my user directory on a 2nd drive on my MacBook for over a year, let me add my two cents worth.

     

    First of all, I would agree: doing this is not supported in any shape or form by Apple, but it does seem to work fine if you follow some basics. For one thing, I needed both the SSD and the HDD to be FileVault encrypted (which works with the current version of FileVault). The disadvantage here is that your user can't log into their account when you reboot - you'll have to log into a different (admin-enabled) account first, which automounts the HDD. Then you can log right back out of the Admin account and log in with the account that has their user directory on that HDD.

     

    It really isn't magic, it works absolutely without a hitch, at least for me for - as I mentioned - over a year.

     

    It isn't pretty, but there you go.

     

    I might add that I tried to do something similar for my wife's Windows 7 machine - she also has a relatively small SSD to boot from (and start software) with a large HDD for data. If you read into the things you have to do to get this working on Windows 7, however, you'll start to realize just how good you have it on OSX - it is a complete catastrophe! Needless to say, I haven't done anything on her machine. You can't even do symlinks in Windows - SOL!

     

    About 4 weeks ago, I ended up opting for a 1 TB SSD because they were on sale on Amazon. Now I have a different issue: my recovery partition is still on Mountain Lion, even though I did a clean install of Mavericks - go figure!

  • jedlh Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Hans D. wrote:

     

    I might add that I tried to do something similar for my wife's Windows 7 machine - she also has a relatively small SSD to boot from (and start software) with a large HDD for data. If you read into the things you have to do to get this working on Windows 7, however, you'll start to realize just how good you have it on OSX - it is a complete catastrophe! Needless to say, I haven't done anything on her machine. You can't even do symlinks in Windows - SOL!

    Thanks for the insights, actually I was about to look into this, sad to hear it's a PIA, but I'm not surprised!

    If you have some links to your own research at hand, I'd be keen to glean them from you?

    If I find a solution (or two) I'll be sure to let you know...

     

    About 4 weeks ago, I ended up opting for a 1 TB SSD because they were on sale on Amazon.

    Problem solved (for you at least), no need to bother with moving entire home dirs!

    The odd sub-dir/file may still be advantageous however, ones that are relatively large & not accessed nearly as much as most that live in ~Library etc.

     

    What was the 1TB SSD you got, Samsung Evo or the Crucial M5x0? (they're currently the best $/GB 6G SSD's)

    If it's a Mac with a 6G SATA interface & you can afford it, a 1TB Extreme II will smash both, but in most use-cases the differences won't be noticeable.

    Plus, both are "very noticeably" faster than a traditional HDD...

  • mark00thomas Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Hans D. wrote:

     

    The disadvantage here is that your user can't log into their account when you reboot - you'll have to log into a different (admin-enabled) account first, which automounts the HDD. Then you can log right back out of the Admin account and log in with the account that has their user directory on that HDD.

    I was having the same problem for a while and it turned out that I had not enabled both user accounts in filevault. After adding both user accounts there I was able to login with eaither one.

  • threesixty Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I spoke with Apple and their recommended solution is to set the prefs for individual apps to save their document files to external drives, which is a partial solution at best.
    (By default, the OS directs many documents to the internal drive, hogging space.)

     

    They don't support or recommend moving the Home folder.

     

    The very fact that there is a discussion about how to do this, and that it takes actions that aren't immediately obvious to an average user, is a bit of a problem in itself.

     

    I'm about to buy a $7000 Mac Pro, with the biggest SSD available for professional purposes:

    1TB SSD with a 12TB external RAID.

    (This imbalance of storage sizes has inherent problems that are mirrored in smaller systems with similar internal/external size ratios.)

     

    My current Mac Pro already has a Home folder close to 1 TB, meaning I'm close to overloading the startup drive as soon as the machine is purchased. If I redirect default file storage as per Apple's advice, I'll cut that to about 500 gig.

     

    My point is that I have work to do. I don't tinker with my computer's file org as a hobby.

     

    I pay for big drives specifically to avoid piddling around with non-standard solutions or monitoring my Home folder all the time to make sure my SSD doesn't get filled up.

     

    If Apple is going to put all their eggs in small SSD startup drives and insist that larger drives be externals, then they should make sure the OS is smart enough to seamlessly offload data-hogging folders to other, larger drives.

     

    It should be simple enough that it doesn't require a long discussion thread in the first place.

     

    Right now, the sexy, fast SSDs are a step backward for users who have a practical need for easy access to large amounts of storage.

  • gantenbeyn Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    it makes more sense to move only "parts" of the Home folder rather then the entire thing


    I have to say I agree. Moving the whole thing causes all kinds of unintended consequences, I'm reverting back to the standard setup now.

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