12 Replies Latest reply: Nov 16, 2013 6:29 AM by Kirby Krieger
CSTRabbi Level 1 (0 points)

I am having trouble with the color brick. I can't change the color of an object, at least not like described here: http://http://thedigitalstory.com/2012/12/easily-color-changin.html.

 

Some background:

 

1. I am working with RAW files.

 

2. I have RTFM.

 

3. I have consulted three books I own on Aperture.

 

4. I have searched the web for help, which is how I came across the link above.

 

5. I am using the color block correctly, but I can only achieve a subtle shift in the change of very pale colors. This is despite adding up to three additional color blocks to try to increase the degree of change, but there is no way I am coming close to being able to change a blue car to purple, let alone to red (this references the link above.)

 

Others must have experienced this, I would think. Any thoughts on what I might do differently to achieve more dramatic results from the color block? I don't even have a specific change in a specific image that I'm asking about—I just want to master the software so that I can do so when I need to. Come to think of it, there is a specific change I want to make in a image. Now it's really an important question!

 

Thanks,

 

Ben


iMac, Mac OS X (10.7.3), 2010 21 inch screen
  • léonie Level 10 (90,985 points)

    Ben, your link:  http://http//thedigitalstory.com/2012/12/easily-color-changin.html   does not work.

    What s it supposed to describe?

  • Owen A Level 2 (235 points)
  • léonie Level 10 (90,985 points)

    Thanks, Owen!

  • léonie Level 10 (90,985 points)
    but I can only achieve a subtle shift in the change of very pale colors.

     

    Have you tried to move the "Range" slider all the way? By clicking on the arrow tips you can step the value far beyond the range of the slider.

     

    Screen Shot 2013-11-14 at 23.19.58GMT+1.png

  • CSTRabbi Level 1 (0 points)

    Léonie, thank you for your suggestion. I have used the Range control, but did not realize it was not limited to the range of the slider. I will try that and let you know what happens. My apologies if that information is in the manual—if so, it must have been under something other than the section on the color block, or else I flat-out missed it!

     

    Thanks again,

     

    Ben

  • CSTRabbi Level 1 (0 points)

    Uh-oh—I clicked This Helped Me because no matter what the results, you gave me new and useful information. I did not remember that it would make the Solved My Problem option disappear. Please send me one more note so that if you solved the problem, I can give you proper credit!

     

    Thanks again,

     

    Ben

  • léonie Level 10 (90,985 points)

    You are welcome, Ben

     

    I learned the stepping of the slider values from Kirby Krieger; I had not seen it in the manual either.

  • Kirby Krieger Level 6 (12,510 points)

    Thanks, Léonie.  A quick way to move any slider to its extreme is to click on the value in the Value Slider and drag all the way left or right.  This is much faster than side-stepping all the way to the far limits.

     

    I think the example the OP (Ben) is trying to emulate is misleading (given the sophistication of the Digital Story poster, deliberately, and wrongly, so).  The car in the original photo is just about the only blue object (and thus pixels) in the image used to demonstrate that one can change the hue of objects using Aperture.  Aperture excels at global adjustments and adjustments made to _imprecisely_ bounded areas.  (This is, contrary to one's expectation, one of Aperture's great strengths: imprecisely-bounded tone and hue shifts are perceived as "natural"; precisely bounded ones look "artificial".  Most photographers (as opposed to graphic artists) wish to retain the illusion of a natural world inside their pictures.)  The only reason the hue-changing trick works with the car in the photo is that the Color adjustment effects only the car because it is the only blue object in the photo (there is a bluish TV in the background, and a bluish logo on one of the displays in the background).

     

    The point is that while object-specific hue-shifts can be made with Aperture, it is not the program of choice for this kind of editing.  A graphics package, which allows for much more control over selecting pixels, is recommended.

  • CSTRabbi Level 1 (0 points)

    Thanks again, Léonie! Kirby, thank you too for you comments about the article and your helpful advice. Are you suggesting something like Photoshop Elements? The full version is way above my pay grade, and that's not even taking the Mt. Everest-like learning curve into account.

     

    Ben

  • léonie Level 10 (90,985 points)

    GIMP (http://www.gimp.org/downloads/)  can do similar things to Photoshop, and it is free, but it has the same Mt. Everest-like learning curve as Photoshop. But if you want to do graphics compositing frequently, it would be worth to invest into learning to master such a professional tool.

  • Gerald Gifford Level 1 (60 points)

    On that note, does anyone here have experience with Pixelmator? Does it work in Aperture as Photoshop and Photoshop Elements do? I'm one who doesn't like Adobe's 'pay monthly' plan and am beginning to look for acceptable alternatives.

     

    Jerry

  • Kirby Krieger Level 6 (12,510 points)

    I don't know a graphics program that doesn't work with Aperture as Aperture's "External Editor".  So, yes, Pixelmator will work.  And it's well worth looking into.