9 Replies Latest reply: Dec 3, 2013 5:34 AM by Rocchinho
Rocchinho Level 1 (0 points)

Hi guys!

 

First of all, sorry for my english. I'm trying to improve myself!

 

I would like to know if could be a smart choice to change my router with a "802.11ac" router. Is there a real increase of performance?

 

Right now i'm using a 10mb in download and 10mb in upload connection (fibre optic).

 

Thank you!

 

 

Rocco


MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Late 2013)
  • Rocchinho Level 1 (0 points)

    Thank you very much leroy!

     

    just another info, please: i'm using a 10mb connection (fibre optic)...how should i "read" that graphic? 1300 mbps means that i can use a 1300mbps connection with that router? So if i'm using a 10mbps connection i will "lose" 1290 mbps?

     

    I can't understand it...sorry!

  • leroydouglas Level 6 (17,777 points)

    Your download speed from your ISP is not changed 10 MB download/upload speed.

     

    http://www.speedtest.net/

     

     

     

    Your transmit rate from router to computer will increase with simultaneous dual band 802.11ac

     

    hold the option key and click on your WiFI  in the upper right screen to see a breakdown.

     

    802.11n will be held back

     

    pic.png

  • hands4 Level 4 (2,220 points)

    As Leroy indicated, your Internet upload and download speed is limited by your ISP's 10 MByte/sec speed.  Increasing the Mac-to-router bandwidth will not increase your upload and download speeds.

  • Rocchinho Level 1 (0 points)

    Thank you very much man, i really appreciate your effort!

     

    Btw...my transmit rate from router to computer will increase with simultaneous dual band 802.11ac...but what if i buy a 300mbps wlan data transfer and not a 1300mbps wlan data transfer?

     

    My connection will be limited in someway?

  • Network 23 Level 6 (11,900 points)

    hands4 wrote:

     

    As Leroy indicated, your Internet upload and download speed is limited by your ISP's 10 MByte/sec speed.

    The rest of that post is correct but let us make sure we are using the correct data rates.

     

    "10 MByte / sec" (10 megabytes per second) seems to be eight times the data rate of the rate mentioned earlier by the user "10mb" (10 megabits per second). My guess is that it is 10 megabits/sec because that is a common household data rate, while 10 megabytes/sec is unusually high for a household service.

  • Rocchinho Level 1 (0 points)

    Yes, my connection is 10megabit per sec. Is the second highest connection you can get in my country i think (for home i mean).

     

    I don't know if i should buy a new router to boost up my brand new mbp retina...i'm really wondering if that ac technologie can give me some more power, but networking is such a difficult subject!

  • Csound1 Level 8 (46,925 points)

    Your connection speed is 10Mb/s

     

    Changing your router will not change that.

  • Network 23 Level 6 (11,900 points)

    You don't have a good reason to get an 802.11ac router if your primary use is Internet from the outside. You will not have enough real opportunities to experience the faster speed if most of your data comes in with the 10Mb limit of your incoming connection.

     

    I bought an 802.11ac router, but that is because I regularly do large file transfers and backups (photo & HD video files) between my computers on my local network. For me, 802.11ac complements my existing use of Gigabit Ethernet for transferring very large files as fast as possible.

     

    If someone rarely moves files around on their own network, or if they are small files, or just Time Capsule backups, 802.11ac isn't going to make much difference. It may help with range, but only if you are beind held back by range or obstacles.

  • Rocchinho Level 1 (0 points)

    Thank you so much guys, now i've a clearer vision about my problem.

     

    I really appreciate your help. God bless you. (as Americans say )