14 Replies Latest reply: Dec 25, 2013 12:45 PM by LowLuster
y0g Level 1 Level 1

Hi,

 

Today while restoring my iphone i realised that itunes had made multiple copies of ~3gb of my iphone data. Since my iphone was restored successfully I decided to remove all the backups and make a fresh new backup. After deleting the multiple backups I found that my available disk space had not increased at all. I even went to ~/Library/Application Support/MobileSync/Backup and ther was nothing in there. So I went ahead and made a new backup which consumed additional ~3gb. And just to test if it was only itunes that was doing this I deleted my photos from iphoto ~5gb and even that did not give me back my 5gb. I went to trash and I dont have anything there.

 

So, here I am confused as to where my deleted stuff is going to because it does not seem like its getting deleted.

 

Anything that i can do get my space back?

 

Thanks,

Yogi


MacBook Pro with Retina display, OS X Mavericks (10.9.1)
Solved by LowLuster on Dec 24, 2013 3:58 AM Solved

I personally don't need them but then "I" don't Willy Nilly Delete files from my computers.

 

Others may come along and state that you Shouldn't Fool with Time Machine and or not to turn the Local Snapshots off. I find that completely ridiculous. This local snapshot feature is only enabled on Mac notebook computers, Never on the desktop models, and it has been my experience that these local snapshots ARE NOT automatically deleted sometimes causing the drive to report that it is full.

 

Bottom line is do what you think is best for you. I have them disabled and it will stay like that.

Reply by LowLuster on Dec 24, 2013 3:26 AM Helpful

It is because of a feature of Time Machine called Local Snapshots. This feature stores copies of files changed or deleted just in case you didn't really want to delete them or you wanted to go back to an older version of the file.

 

Read this to find out more about these local snapshots which in my opinion are just a total wast of hard drive space.

 

http://www.pondini.org/TM/30.html

All replies

  • LowLuster Level 6 Level 6

    It is because of a feature of Time Machine called Local Snapshots. This feature stores copies of files changed or deleted just in case you didn't really want to delete them or you wanted to go back to an older version of the file.

     

    Read this to find out more about these local snapshots which in my opinion are just a total wast of hard drive space.

     

    http://www.pondini.org/TM/30.html

  • y0g Level 1 Level 1

    That was it. Thank you so much. The moment I disabled the snaphot I got all 20gb back. I think I am good with the time machine making backups on my external drive. I really dont need the local snapshots(? correct).

  • LowLuster Level 6 Level 6

    I personally don't need them but then "I" don't Willy Nilly Delete files from my computers.

     

    Others may come along and state that you Shouldn't Fool with Time Machine and or not to turn the Local Snapshots off. I find that completely ridiculous. This local snapshot feature is only enabled on Mac notebook computers, Never on the desktop models, and it has been my experience that these local snapshots ARE NOT automatically deleted sometimes causing the drive to report that it is full.

     

    Bottom line is do what you think is best for you. I have them disabled and it will stay like that.

  • Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10
    expertise.applications
    Applications

    As usual, you've been given computer-illiterate advice by someone who knows nothing about Time Machine. Following that advice may cause you to lose data.

  • LowLuster Level 6 Level 6

    First off I never suggested to the OP that he turn off the TM local snapshots. I did point him to Pondini's website to read the information posted on it. It was his decision to turn off the local snapshots after reading Pondini's website without any reference from me to turn that totally useless feature off.

    I only commented on what I do after the OP posted that he had turned it off and how he then got the missing space back.

     

    I find your posts on this subject completely offensive to me and I wish you would stop. I have reported your post as inappropriate.

     

    If Apple wanted that feature to be on all the time they would not of put in place a way to turn it off and they would enable it on all Mac computers made. They haven't enabled that feature on any other line of Mac computers except the notebooks and they included a way to turn it off.

     

    If you find that going against your use of Time Machine you are well with in your rights to leave it on and complain to Apple that is should always be enabled on ALL Mac computers and no way to turn it off.

     

    Until then please refrain from trying to demean me with your comments on this subject.

    Thank you.

    Linc Davis wrote:

     

    As usual, you've been given computer-illiterate advice by someone who knows nothing about Time Machine. Following that advice may cause you to lose data.

  • LowLuster Level 6 Level 6

    Please explain what Data loss the OP would experience by turning that feature off. What is different about a notebook Mac from a desktop model, iMac, Mac Pro or Mac Mini, that does not have a Time Machine drive connected to it continuously?

    Linc Davis wrote:

     

    As usual, you've been given computer-illiterate advice by someone who knows nothing about Time Machine. Following that advice may cause you to lose data.

  • Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10
    expertise.applications
    Applications

    I couldn't care less what you find offensive. I care about irresponsible, ignorant, and potentially harmful advice being handed out on this site by fake experts. I'm not interested in trying to teach you anything either.

     

    As for the post being deleted, it should be, and so should this one.

  • LowLuster Level 6 Level 6

    What I posted wasn't any of those things you listed. Pondini's own website clearly explains what these local snapshots are and lists the commands to disable it or enable it if the user so chooses, even on Mac desktop system.

    But I guess you don't agree with that either.

     

    Then why don't you keep your Opinions, because that is what they are Not Facts, to yourself. Especially about other members of this forum community.

     

    You could teach many a lot, even me. But your continued comments to me, in the manor you are making them, on this subject is not helpful to anyone.

    You still haven't bothered to explain why it is So Bad to turn this Feature off. I have to wonder why.

     

    Thanks and a Merry Christmas to you and yours.

  • y0g Level 1 Level 1

    Can you please point me to some document that explains in detail, what issues I might face if I choose to keep the feature turned off?

  • Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10
    expertise.applications
    Applications
    Local snapshots are hidden copies of files that have been changed or deleted in between Time Machine snapshots. They are stored in free space that would otherwise be unused, and therefore wasted. The space occupied by the snapshots is managed automatically. When free space starts to run low, the snapshots are deleted. The Finder reports the space occupied by local snapshots as "Available," which it is.
      
    If there are unwanted changes to your files in between Time Machine snapshots — which may be far apart when you're moving around with a portable computer — you may be able to revert the changes from a local snapshot. If you disable local snapshots, you lose that protection, and you gain nothing. There is no offsetting benefit whatsoever; merely added risk.
      
    Empty storage space is simply wasted. You paid for it to be there, but it's doing you no good at all. Local snapshots put it to use.
      
    Very rarely, if ever, you might need to delete the local snapshot store in order to add a large amount of data all at once. If that need ever arises, which it probably won't, all you have to do is turn Time Machine OFF in its preference pane, and then turn it back ON immediately.
      
    You should ignore the bad advice that circulates on this site to disable local snapshots permanently by running a shell command. If you ran such a command, ask for instructions on how to reverse it.
  • speeder1956 Level 1 Level 1

    Linc,

     

    I have a question, not relative to this post. Can I 'direct message' you, please?

     

    Thanks,

     

    Brian

     

    P.S. I do not know how. Hence, "Can I..."

  • speeder1956 Level 1 Level 1

    Linc,

     

    I apologize, if I have breached etiquette. New here, and am unfamiliar with communication protocol.

     

    I have a Twitter acct. Would you 'direct message' me, there?

     

    I see you are quite busy!

     

    Thanks,

     

    Brian

     

    @wwabissabi (on Twitter)

  • LowLuster Level 6 Level 6

    There really are any document explaining what issue you might face because in all honesty there aren't any. Turning off the local snapshots has no effect on how time machine works or how your system works. The website I linked to in my first reply is the most knowledgeable source for time machine and the local snapshots. The other poster has a problem with this feature being disabled. But as pointed out on that website they aren't real backups and don't count on them. Also no other Mac computer has this feature enabled by default. Only notebook Macs.

  • LowLuster Level 6 Level 6

    That should read "there AREN'T any documents". Posting from phone.