8 Replies Latest reply: Feb 17, 2014 8:53 AM by Michael Grenadier
Tom Baker1 Level 3 Level 3 (585 points)

I've just bought a copy of Final Cut Studio 2 with FCP 6 off Ebay, a full install, not just an upgrade, and when it gets here, I'll want to install it on my G5 Mac, which for the last few years has been running the original Studio with FCP 5, in OS 10.5.8. Both the old and the new studio suites are the academic versions, if that makes any difference.

 

While I'm waiting for Studio 2 to get here, I'm wondering whether I will need to un-install Studio 1 before installing Studio 2. Or will Studio 2 just install right over the top of the earlier version and update anything it needs to?

 

I guess the question really is: what's the best way to install Studio 2 on a machine that already has Studio 1 on it, and which has been working fine on it for years?

 

Tom


Mac OS X (10.5.8), 8 GB of RAM
  • Michael Grenadier Level 7 Level 7 (20,335 points)

    Best practice is to do a wipe of the drive and reinstall os and app.  Here's a user tip on this subject

     

    https://discussions.apple.com/docs/DOC-2861

     

    That said, you can just install on top of the old installation and you may be alright.  I went years without ever doing a complete clean install but eventually I did a complete reinstall and the system was definitely leaner and meaner.

  • Jim Cookman Level 7 Level 7 (23,435 points)

    I'm with Michael on this. I'll just add clone your start up drive first, then if you have any issue you can be back up and running in minutes.  But a clean install of everything returns your machine to the state it was when it came out of the box.  And you also might just slap a brand new drive in first.  Everybody loves a brand new drive.

  • Tom Baker1 Level 3 Level 3 (585 points)

    Thanks for the advice. I just put two brand new 2 TB drives into this G5 about a week ago, because the old drives were over three years old, and from past experience that's about the age that they start to go bad on me. Plus I needed more room for things (the old drives were 1 TBs). I also picked up a quad-core G5 and switched over to that box to get a little extra speed and more memory for video editing. The final improvement will be the switch to Studio 2 after years of working with the earlier version.

     

    But both of those new drives are stuffed with about ten years' worth of book manuscripts, videos created with Final Cut, the Adobe CS suite, and gobs of other stuff. A Time Machine backup onto a new external drive that I did before switching to the new hard drives took about seven hours, followed by many more hours to put it all back on the new drives with a Time Machine restore. Since installing into a different box broke the licenses for the Adobe apps and other programs, those all had to be reactivated, etc. Altogether a royal pain, but the payoff was getting new drives in a better Mac.

     

    So now, I guess in order to do right by the Final Cut Studio 2 upgrade, I'll have to wipe the startup drive and replace the system and remove and install all the files and apps yet again. This is getting tiresome, but I guess you're right, and it's the price I'll have to pay to end up with a smooth running video editing system.

     

    I still have the old G5 running the two old hard drives, with everything on them, so as an experiment I could try a simple install of Studio 2 right on top of Studio 1 into that Mac, just to see what happens. But I guess, from what I've been reading here, it's just not the best thing to do on my current Mac.

     

    Thanks again,

     

    Tom

  • Tom Baker1 Level 3 Level 3 (585 points)

    I went both routes, both a clean install and a dirty one, on different drives, and the results seem to be the same. My G5 has two hard drives in it, one that I use as the normal startup and work drive, and a second one that is mostly for storage. I backed up the storage drive and did a fresh install of 10.5.8 and Final Cut Studio 2 on it, and it works fine.

     

    I also installed Studio 2 on the first drive, after simply trashing all the Final Cut related stuff that I could find  on it, and that installation also works fine, exactly the same as far as I can tell. On that drive I have been continuing to work on projects that I started in Studio 1, and everything seems the same in every way. No speed gains, no new features that I've encountered, yet. In fact, I'm now wondering whether it was worth the hassle of upgrading to Studio 2, since I can detect no improvements so far. FCP 6 seems to be exactly the same as FCP 5, LiveType and Motion seem the same, etc. Maybe I'll note some benefits as I continue to work on these projects.

     

    Anyway, to repeat, for anyone checking this topic out in the future, either method of installing Studio works fine, either the time-cosuming and probably better clean install of a system and Studio on a wiped disk, or the quick-and-dirty install right onto the same old disk after trashing the previous versions of Studio's programs.

     

    Thanks to everybody for the help and advice.

     

    Tom

  • Studio X Level 7 Level 7 (27,015 points)

    Glad things worked for you,.

     

    Still, don't make the logical error of generalizing from the particular to the universal. Just because something worked for you does not in any way mean it will work for everyone else.

     

    For people who discover this thread - follow Jim and Michael's advice regarding backing up if you chose to do an overwrite install (or just do a clean install on a new drive) and you'll be golden.

     

    x

  • Tom Baker1 Level 3 Level 3 (585 points)

    Let me be more specific, then, and say that a "dirty" install over a previous, deleted version, CAN work perfectly well. Because for me, it DID work very well---just as well as the clean install I experimentally did on another drive.

     

    If you were going to wipe the drive anyway, as I was, you may as well give it a try first, just to see what happens. If you don't like what happens, continue with Plan A and wipe the drive and do a clean install.

     

    In my case, the "dirty" install worked great, kept all FCP my preferences and plug-ins intact, and saved me a lot of time and trouble. The experiment paid off.

     

    Tom

  • Studio X Level 7 Level 7 (27,015 points)

    This forum is constantly inundated by pleas for help after every FCP /OSX upgrade. Most if not all of these problems could have been solved by having a functioning clone of the system prior upgrading. When things go wrong - and they do often - this allows people to gracefully retreat to a functioning system then start again with a clean install of the OS and software.

     

    As a matter of "best practices" it is a good idea to refresh your machine every few years with a clean install of operating system and software. You'd be amazed how much better it will run when all the junk of disused and abandoned software has been cleared out.

     

    x

  • Michael Grenadier Level 7 Level 7 (20,335 points)

    and to add to Studio's comment, down the road when you're having problems, troubleshooting can be much more difficult as problems may be caused by that long forgotten upgrade.  Creating a new clean install, making sure everything's working properly and then cloning your startup drive so you can quickly resume work if things go south, is the ideal way to work if you depend on your system to make a living.