6 Replies Latest reply: Feb 15, 2014 11:36 PM by K Shaffer
lesliepaul1949 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

From:           MacMail

          Subject:           Integration Notification

          Date:           February 15, 2014 7:08:04 PM EST

          To:           Leslie

As we strive to secure your account, please be informed to migrate to our latest security platform here.

Your privacy and protection is our concern.

 

Apple Support

 

The link takes you to a pagee that requires the following information:

 


You're Required To Automatically Upgrade Your Apple ID By Integrating To Our Latest Security Platform To Guarantee Up To Date Protection On Your Account. Our System Automatically Integrates Your Account On Successful Submission Of Valid Credentials Required Below.

Kindly Integrate Now

 

Confirm Your Contact And Credit Information Below.


Full Names *


Address *


City *


State *


Zip Code *


Phone *


Name On Card *


Credit Card Number *


Expires (mm/yyyy) *


Security Code *
Last 3 or 4 digit at the back of your credit card.

 

 

Confirm Your Verification Data Below.


Date of Birth (mm/dd/yyyy) *


Social Security Number (XXX-XX-XXXX) *


Mother's Maiden Name *


Drivers License ID *

 

 

Confirm Your Apple ID Or Your iCloud Account Below.


Apple ID *
example@me.com or example@mac.com or example@icloud.com


Password *
Enter your Apple password here.

 

VERIFIED WITH APPLE SUPPORT THIS IS A SCAM!

 

<Links Edited by Host>


iOS 7.0.4, OS 7.5
  • Ralph Landry1 Level 8 Level 8 (37,330 points)

    Several forms of this phishing scam have been going around for at least a couple months...this one is the most thorough n the data gathering.

  • lesliepaul1949 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I was unaware there existed phishing scams such as the one I posted.  The fact that they were "requiring" so much data was what raised doubt.  Thanks for replying.

  • Ralph Landry1 Level 8 Level 8 (37,330 points)

    You are welcome, and these kinds of things are good to check out...Apple does not operate the way the way that emailed tried to deal with you.

  • lesliepaul1949 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I called apple support and asked if that email was in fact from them.  The young lady was kind enough to verify that apple did NOT sent out the email.  The bonus, I didn't have to purchase a 1 time support thingy.  Have a great evening.

  • K Shaffer Level 6 Level 6 (10,610 points)

    The fake security link in the above where it says click "here" and a mouse-over gives a suspicious web URL, has been blocked and from what I found by doing a little research. Although it says it was a wordpress page to redboxcancater - the site had been somehow hacked to forward to another one, in NL instead of AU. Of course neither odd location online makes any sense regarding a global brand with HQ in California. At least to a skeptic.

     

    fake security link.jpg

    {image is from page linked to in above scam form, is what came

    up when I copy-pasted hidden 'click here' link in secure browser}


    When considering any email from what you think is a trusted site and company, such as a bank that you already do business with, or Apple Inc where you have some kind of account with them, consider they already have enough on you to satisfy their need. You login to their site to access your account. And they specify all kinds of details about it, as a trustworthy business and vendor of quality products, services, etc.

     

    Email has never really been secure, so using it should be like an open book. Sites with security and updated browsers are a better. Hidden links and redirects, tricks, etc are not uncommon. I get email from a bank but it says 'do not reply' and the standard statement says to contact them directly, and type in their web address, do not trust a click here button or a blue line of text, since that can be something else.

     

    You are fortunate to be skeptical before going further.

     

    Keep your guard up, even in retail where the clerk at

    a fast stop food shop has access to a credit card out

    of sight. At least you have recourse with CC company.

     

    Good luck & happy computing!

  • K Shaffer Level 6 Level 6 (10,610 points)

    PS:

    The above form (at this time) still has active links and could redirect someone's

    information elsewhere online much the same as it could from the original email.

     

    So this aspect has been reported to a Host with the suggestion a screen shot of

    the original form be substitued by them, as a measure of safety to a visitor or a

    younger person with curious interest. No telling where it could go.

     

    Thought I'd mention this, as it was all active when I checked the form.

    The settings in my browser caught the suspicious site, but the boxes

    in the form are active, and content tries to go elsewhere in a browser.

     

    Good luck & happy computing!