7 Replies Latest reply: Feb 26, 2014 4:47 PM by Number88
synchronizer Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

Hello. I have a computer running Mac OSX 10.6.8 with a Windows XP partition. I have found that I don't use the Windows partition often enough to warrant keeping it. I have a 500GB drive (Hard Disc) with fewer than 40GB on the mac partition. I gave Windows 150GB, but I have 70GB left, and I see that I no longer need more than 50% of the files I have stored.

 

I have decided that I would like to delete my Windows partition, but I am wondering whether there is a certain failure rate associated with restoring the original size of the hard drive partition. To what degree is it safe to delete Windows?

 

On another note, I would very much like to begin using Linux (for example, Ubuntu) for programming. Is there a way to use Bootcamp to install Linux, or is this not possible? I understand that it may in fact be feasible, but Apple has not released drivers that would enable Linux to make use of specific key functions and preference options, unless Linux users have released customized drivers.

 

These are my options:

 

     -Delete Windows, but create a new partition for XP that is approximately 75GB rather than 150GB. The partiton would have nothing but windows-only      applications -- no large files or any videos and photographs.

 

     -Delete Windows and somehow look into Linux

 

     -Delete Windows and use Virtual Box to install Lninux in a virtual machine.

 

What course of action should I pursue?

 

 

I am looking forward to responses. Thank you.


MacBook Pro, Mac OS X (10.6.8)
  • Number88 Level 3 Level 3 (750 points)

    You can delete Windows by using the "remove Windows" option in Bootcamp Assistant. This is the only safe way to remove it.

    After a reboot you can then restart Bootcamp Assistant and install Windows in a new partition with a size of your choice.

     

    Once Bootcamp has installed Windows you should not resize nor create/delete any partitions. This will render Windows unbootable.

    Therefore installing a Linux system should not be attempted once a Bootcamp Windows partition exists.

     

    However, a lot of Linux distributions work perfectly well as a virtual machine in something like Parallels, VMWare Fusion (both paid-for programs) or in VirtualBox, which is free to use.

  • synchronizer Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Yes I know to use Bootcamp to delete the partition, but I am asking whether it has ever failed or had glitches of any sort.

     

    -and I'm asking whether a Linux partition can be made instead of a Windows one.

    -I know that in fact one can have Mac, Windows, and Linux partitions (with some extra steps), so one of your comments isn't necessarily true. Regardless, I'm only interested in the possibility of a Mac/Linux setup.

  • Number88 Level 3 Level 3 (750 points)

    Sorry,

    I have not heard of any problems removing Windows via Bootcamp Assistant.

    Yes, a partition can be created for use by Linux rather than Windows but not through Bootcamp, as such.

    Yes, you can have OSX, Windows and Linux running on the same disk - either by installing Windows and Linux in EFI mode, or by manually creating/changing the hybrid MBR created by Bootcamp/Disk Utility, though it is likely to cause problems in the future.

    Yes, you can have Linux running side by side with OSX though that too can be problematic.

  • synchronizer Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    It's strange that having Linux run alongside OSX may be a problem, since OSX is a derivative of Linux.

     

    I assume that in order to create a Linux partition I would have to use disc utility. Is this correct?

     

    Anyway, I will probably take the virtual box route. I'm mostly interested in the Linux programming environment, so whatever I do in Lnux shouldn't be too demanding.

     

    Thanks.

  • Number88 Level 3 Level 3 (750 points)

    Many would disagree with your first comment

    You could create the free space for a Linux partition with disk utility but I'm not sure it creates partitions in a format suitable for Linux.

    Virtualization is probably suitable for your needs (with a lot less headaches).

  • synchronizer Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Well it's certainly closer than Windows.

  • Number88 Level 3 Level 3 (750 points)

    Lol, that's true