Previous 1 2 Next 18 Replies Latest reply: Apr 10, 2014 11:37 AM by MlchaelLAX
omaticnyc Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

Hello OSX community!

 

To install OSX10.6 on a 2010 MacBookPro, must I use a MacBook specific install disk? (I misplaced the original disk). I do have a clean Apple OSX10.6.3 disk -is that OK? Or are there necessaryMacBook specific files that are missing from that disk?

Also - are updates to 10.6.8 still available?

 

Thank you!


MacBook, Mac OS X (10.6.8)
  • C F McBlob Level 4 Level 4 (2,865 points)

    There are OEM discs and retail discs.

    OEM discs are machine (hardware) specific and they're grey. (notice this one is for iMac)

    002.JPG

    OEM discs will either be white or they'll have a picture of the OS "cat" on them.

    index.jpg

     

    Retail discs can be installed on any machine that meets the system rquirements for the OS.

    You can update to 10.6.8 here: http://support.apple.com/kb/dl1399

  • a brody Level 9 Level 9 (64,125 points)

    You have to tell your season or time frame of 2010 the MacBook Pro was manufactured, or Model Identifier. 


    Use the serial number search here to find that out:

     

    https://discussions.apple.com/docs/DOC-6413

     

    MacBook Pro Mid-2010 and later must use the prebundled 10.6 installer disk.

    MacBook Pro 6,x and later must use the prebundled 10.6 installer disk.

     

    Older ones may use the 10.6 retail disc.

    Call AppleCare if your model is too new for the retail disc, as they will give you your system specific disk.

  • omaticnyc Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Thanks to both of you for taking the time to help me with this!

    I'm thinking that - rather than wait for Apple to send me a new 10.6.8 install disk - I'll make an appointment with a "Genius" at an Apple store instead. I live in New York City, so that's easy for me. And I think that they'll be able to install OSX on the MacBook's replacement hard drive. I can boot the new HD from an external HD I have and format the disk...

     

    But I'm also thinking that it may make sense to use this opportunity to upgrade to Mavericks, since it's downloadable and free. Which leads to a new question - if I boot from OSX 10.6.8 on an external HD, will I be able to download and install Mavericks onto the MacBook? I'm not sure what the proper protocol is here, so I'm going to post that as a new question.

     

    Cheers!

  • omaticnyc Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    By the way, it's a mid-2010 MacBook Pro (7,1).

  • MlchaelLAX Level 4 Level 4 (1,910 points)


    omaticnyc wrote:

     

    I do have a clean Apple OSX10.6.3 disk -is that OK?

     

    YES!

     

    ALL 2010 MacBook Pro's can use the retail Mac OS X Snow Leopard 10.6.3 Install DVD to install Snow Leopard.

     

    The earlier information you were given is incorrect.  Sorry, I am on the West Coast and don't get up as early as you!

     

    Screen Shot 2014-03-28 at 10.14.18 AM.png

     

    Screen Shot 2014-03-28 at 10.15.44 AM.png

     

    Screen Shot 2014-03-28 at 10.15.53 AM.png

                                  [click on images to enlarge]

  • MlchaelLAX Level 4 Level 4 (1,910 points)

    a brody wrote:

     

    You have to tell your season or time frame of 2010 the MacBook Pro was manufactured, or Model Identifier. 

    I am not sure why you continue to beat the drum that some 2010 MacBook Pros cannot use the retail Mac OS X Snow Leopard 10.6.3 Install DVD.

     

    The "higher" version of Snow Leopard (i.e., 10.6.6) required by some model Macs (that will not boot from the retail 10.6.3) were not introduced until the 2011 model year.

  • MlchaelLAX Level 4 Level 4 (1,910 points)

    omaticnyc wrote:

     

    Which leads to a new question - if I boot from OSX 10.6.8 on an external HD, will I be able to download and install Mavericks onto the MacBook?

    BE SURE to keep your existing OS X environment intact!  Do NOT install Mavericks over it.  You  can install Snow Leopard over it with few, if any, problems.

     

    Use a separate partition or external hard drive to install Mavericks and you will save yourself hours and hours of grief!

  • a brody Level 9 Level 9 (64,125 points)

    With all releases prior when there was a hardware revision after the retail release, Apple released system specific discs for those machines.      http://www.everymac.com/ shows that the MacBook Pro mid-2010 model was released after April 1, 2010 on

    April 13, 2010

    And we have this:

     

    From Wikipedia:

    VersionBuild[72]DateOS nameNotesDownload
    10.610A432August 28, 2009Darwin 10.0Original retail DVD releaseN/A
    10A433Server edition; Original retail DVD release
    10.6.110B504September 10, 2009Darwin 10.1About the Mac OS X v10.6.1 UpdateMac OS X v10.6.1 Update
    10.6.210C540November 9, 2009Darwin 10.2About the Mac OS X v10.6.2 UpdateMac OS X v10.6.2 Update
    10.6.310D573March 29, 2010Darwin 10.3About the Mac OS X v10.6.3 UpdateMac OS X v10.6.3 Update
    10D575April 1, 2010Second retail DVD releaseN/A
    10D578April 13, 2010About the Mac OS X v10.6.3 Update; v1.1Mac OS X v10.6.3 v1.1 Update (Combo)
    10.6.410F569June 15, 2010Darwin 10.4About the Mac OS X v10.6.4 UpdateMac OS X v10.6.4 Update (Combo)
    10.6.510H574November 10, 2010Darwin 10.5About the Mac OS X v10.6.5 UpdateMac OS X v10.6.5 Update (Combo)
    10.6.610J567January 6, 2011Darwin 10.6About the Mac OS X v10.6.6 UpdateMac OS X v10.6.6 Update (Combo)
    10.6.710J869March 21, 2011Darwin 10.7About the Mac OS X v10.6.7 UpdateMac OS X v10.6.7 Update (Combo)
    10J3250March 21, 2011For the early 2011 Macbook ProMac OS X v10.6.7 Update for early 2011 MacBook Pro
    10J4138May 4, 2011For the early 2011 Macbook ProMacBook Pro Software Update 1.4
    10.6.810K540June 23, 2011Darwin 10.8About the Mac OS X v10.6.8 UpdateMac OS X v10.6.8 Update (Combo)
    10K549July 25, 2011About the Mac OS X v10.6.8 Update; v1.1Mac OS X v10.6.8 v1.1 Update (Combo)

    I rest of my case.  If you are able to successfully get it to work, then Apple needs to revise the system specific knowledgebase article:

    http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1159

  • MlchaelLAX Level 4 Level 4 (1,910 points)

    Your own post proves my point:

     

    If the 2010 iMac was released on April 13, 2010, then it would include the last revision to 10.6.3:

     

    Screen Shot 2014-03-28 at 11.41.10 AM.png

     

    You're assuming that the 2010 MacBook Pro will only accept the 10D578 version to boot from.  I posit that it will boot from the retail disc and then of course need an update to v1.1 online.

     

    Anecdotally, I have yet to see a post on this forum where an owner of a 2010 MacBook Pro was unable to boot it from the 10.6.3 retail Install DVD.

     

    Perhaps the OP will attempt it and report back his results on this issue.

     

     

    a brody wrote:

     

    If you are able to successfully get it to work, then Apple needs to revise the system specific knowledgebase article:

    http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1159

    Your Wikipedia quote and Apple's article are inconsistent with the build numbers for 10.6.3. Since I am the publisher of neither, it is not my responsibiity to keep them consistent.

  • omaticnyc Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    So....

    I can report that the mid-2010 MacBook was able to boot up from the retail 10.6.3 disk, and I think I succeeded in installing the OS. But I can't say definitively that the whole process was have been successful, because I didn't complete it....

    And the reason for that is that it became apparent that the fundamental problem I was dealing with wasn't a failed HD that needed to be replaced with a new one, it was that the cable connecting the internal HD to the computer was failing. You more experienced people are probably well aware that this is a common problem for that MacBook. In the end the original HD, which of course included a working version of OSX, was re-installed.

     

    And since I needed to get the darn thing fixed right away so that my daughter could head back to college with it I ended up taking it to a Mac repair shop in Manhattan that had the part and could install it pronto.

     

    Finally I want to again thank all three responders to my question. I know that good information results from the clash of different ideas in forums like this, but I'm also very happy that people are willing to give it their best shot.

     

    I hope you're all having a good weekend.

  • MlchaelLAX Level 4 Level 4 (1,910 points)

    Congratulations and best wishes on your daughter's college career!

     

    Once again, I can state:

    MlchaelLAX wrote:

     

    Anecdotally, I have yet to see a post on this forum where an owner of a 2010 MacBook Pro was unable to boot it from the 10.6.3 retail Install DVD.

  • linacre6262 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    None of the above is totally correct.

     

    The mid 2010 MBP was supplied with a grey disk with a newer build number than the retail 10.6.3 disk. That means it will not install from a 10.6.3 retail disk onto a 2010 MBP. Fact ! I have a mid 2010 MBP and a retail 10.6.3 disk, and have tried several times to do this. Trust me - it does not work.

     

    Omaticnyc is right though that the MBP will boot from the retail disk - but the install will not complete - it fails after 10 minutes or so with no error message, and the machine then hangs. The same thing happens if you load the disk and choose it in Startup disk then restart. The odd thing about this latter method is that usually Startup disk  flags up when a disk is unsuitable for a particular computer - in this case it doesn't.

     

    This leaves post April 2010 MBP owners dependent on keeping hold of a working grey disk for their machine if they want to stick with Snow Leopard AND stay within their licence terms. And means buyers of secondhand MBPs MUST get the original disks. Or upgrade to a post Snow Leopard OS.

     

    There is though a way round all this - unfortunately it probably isn't within the licence Ts & Cs...

     

    When Leopard came out, it required an 867 MHz processor to boot/install. There were several workarounds to this, one of which was to install Leopard onto a drive in a compatible computer, then switch the drive (or clone it) to a slower one. And the same trick works to boot/install from the 10.6.3 retail disk onto a post April 2010 MBP. I've done it using a Mac Mini to install 10.6.3 then the 10.6.8 combo upgrade, and the only downside I can see is that the MBP then shows up as a Mac Mini in System Profiler.

     

    The real shame (and maybe even stupidity on Apple's part) is that for 15 months no retail OS disk was/is available for any MBP and perhaps for any other computer built in this period. Makes you wonder what the purpose of retail disks is...either they're universal install media...or they're a means of generating extra revenue. And if it's the former, then a retail disk should be made available at the point of upgrading from one OS to the next - indeed if Apple could include Drop in DVDs at upgrade time, then a complimentary fully upgraded disk could have been included too.

     

    Better yet someone could/should devise a method of streamlining Mac OS disks...

  • MlchaelLAX Level 4 Level 4 (1,910 points)

    linacre6262 wrote:

     

    None of the above is totally correct.

     

    If what you say is true, then I owe a brody AN APOLOGY!   It is an interesting turn of a phrase however...

     

    Oglethorpe and others have consistently recommended the "install Snow Leopard 10.6.3 into another Mac, upgrade to 10.6.8, clone and move clone over" approach as one option for the 2011 Macs suffering from this same problem:

     

    https://discussions.apple.com/message/24997480#24997480

     

    linacre6262 wrote:

     

    Better yet someone could/should devise a method of (slip)stream^ing Mac OS disks...

     

    http://hints.macworld.com/article.php?story=20120123175902871

     

    https://discussions.apple.com/message/25009592#25009592

     

    I keep a copy in my library for just such purposes!

     

    Lastly, it IS totally correct that I wished omaticnyc's  daugher, best wishes for her college career!

  • linacre6262 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Apologies for my errors - I too wish the lady all the best in her career.

     

    And I did mean slipstreaming - I can't be held responsible for not being totally up to speed with these Windoze related terms - at my age, I'm only just keeping a grip on the Mac ones !

     

    I like the idea of a universal 10.6.7 disk - I have an iMac one somewhere, so I'll try it later in the week and report back.

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