10 Replies Latest reply: Feb 12, 2015 2:57 PM by markymark1975
hhguitar Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

I have a MBP, retina, mid 2012, OSX 10.9.2.  My disk space has been progressively decreasing despite using an external hard drive for almost everything.  I'm currently down to about 7 GB of free space.  Turns out I have a MobileBackups volume listed as taking up 250 GB.  I tried removing it using the sudo tmutil disablelocal command in terminal... the volume dissapears from Finder but my disk space doesn't change.  Also, when I turn off and then on Time Machine the volume pops right back up in Finder.  How do I remove the MobileBackups volume for good?

 

Thanks


MacBook Pro with Retina display, OS X Mavericks (10.9.2)
  • Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10 (155,430 points)

    Unfortunately, you took some of the worst of the bogus advice that circulates on this site.

    These instructions must be carried out as an administrator. If you have only one user account, you are the administrator.

    Please triple-click anywhere in the line below on this page to select it:

    sudo mv /.MobileBackups.trash /Trashme
    

    Copy the selected text to the Clipboard by pressing the key combination command-C.

    Launch the built-in Terminal application in any of the following ways:

    ☞ Enter the first few letters of its name into a Spotlight search. Select it in the results (it should be at the top.)

    ☞ In the Finder, select Go Utilities from the menu bar, or press the key combination shift-command-U. The application is in the folder that opens.

    ☞ Open LaunchPad. Click Utilities, then Terminal in the icon grid.

    Paste into the Terminal window by pressing the key combination command-V. I've tested these instructions only with the Safari web browser. If you use another browser, you may have to press the return key after pasting. You'll be prompted for your login password. Nothing will be displayed when you type it. If you don’t have a login password, you’ll need to set one before you can run the command. You may get a one-time warning to be careful. Confirm. You don't need to post the warning.

    If you see a message that your username "is not in the sudoers file," then you're not logged in as an administrator. Log in as one and start over.

    Wait for a new line ending in a dollar sign ($) to appear below what you entered. You can then quit Terminal.

    There will now be a folder called "Trashme" at the top level of the startup volume. Drag it to the Trash and empty. You may be prompted again for your password.

  • hhguitar Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Hmmm I tried that but I got this error message:

     

    mv: rename /.MobileBackups.trash to /Trashme: No such file or directory

  • Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10 (155,430 points)

    If you've installed third-party software called "Disk Drill," I suggest you remove it according to the developer's  instructions. If you prefer to keep the software, refer to the developer for support.

  • hhguitar Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I don't have Disk Drill...

  • Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10 (155,430 points)

    For information about the Other category in the Storage display, see this support article. If the Storage display seems to be inaccurate, try rebuilding the Spotlight index.

       

    Empty the Trash if you haven't already done so. If you use iPhoto, empty its internal Trash first:

     

    iPhoto ▹ Empty Trash

      

    Do the same in other applications, such as Aperture, that have an internal Trash feature. Then restart the computer. That will temporarily free up some space.

     

    According to Apple documentation, you need at least 9 GB of available space on the startup volume (as shown in the Finder Info window) for normal operation. You also need enough space left over to allow for growth of the data. There is little or no performance advantage to having more available space than the minimum Apple recommends. Available storage space that you'll never use is wasted space.

      

    When Time Machine backs up a portable Mac, some of the free space will be used to make local snapshots, which are backup copies of recently deleted files. The space occupied by local snapshots is reported as available by the Finder, and should be considered as such. In the Storage display of System Information, local snapshots are shown as  Backups. The snapshots are automatically deleted when they expire or when free space falls below a certain level. You ordinarily don't need to, and should not, delete local snapshots yourself. If you followed bad advice to disable local snapshots by running a shell command, you may have ended up with a lot of data in the Other category. Ask for instructions in that case.

       

    See this support article for some simple ways to free up storage space.

     

    You can more effectively use a tool such as OmniDiskSweeper (ODS) or GrandPerspective (GP) to explore the volume and find out what's taking up the space. You can also delete files with it, but don't do that unless you're sure that you know what you're deleting and that all data is safely backed up. That means you have multiple backups, not just one. Note that ODS only works with OS X 10.8 or later. If you're running an older OS version, use GP.

        

    Deleting files inside an iPhoto or Aperture library will corrupt the library. Any changes to a photo library must be made from within the application that created it. The same goes for Mail files.

     

    Proceed further only if the problem isn't solved by the above steps.

     

    ODS or GP can't see the whole filesystem when you run it just by double-clicking; it only sees files that you have permission to read. To see everything, you have to run it as root.

     

    Back up all data now.

     

    If you have more than one user account, make sure you're logged in as an administrator. The administrator account is the one that was created automatically when you first set up the computer.

       

    Install the app you downloaded in the Applications folder as usual. Quit it if it's running.

     

    Triple-click anywhere in the corresponding line of text below on this page to select it, then copy the selected text to the Clipboard by pressing the key combination command-C:

    sudo /Applications/OmniDiskSweeper.app/Contents/MacOS/OmniDiskSweeper
    sudo /Applications/GrandPerspective.app/Contents/MacOS/GrandPerspective

    Launch the built-in Terminal application in any of the following ways:

     

    ☞ Enter the first few letters of its name into a Spotlight search. Select it in the results (it should be at the top.)

     

    ☞ In the Finder, select Go ▹ Utilities from the menu bar, or press the key combination shift-command-U. The application is in the folder that opens.

     

    ☞ Open LaunchPad. Click Utilities, then Terminal in the icon grid.

     

    Paste into the Terminal window by pressing command-V. You'll be prompted for your login password, which won't be displayed when you type it. You may get a one-time warning to be careful. If you see a message that your username "is not in the sudoers file," then you're not logged in as an administrator.

     

    The application window will open, eventually showing all files in all folders, sorted by size. It may take a few minutes for the app to finish scanning.

     

    I don't recommend that you make a habit of doing this. Don't delete anything as root. If something needs to be deleted, make sure you know what it is and how it got there, and then delete it by other, safer, means. When in doubt, leave it alone or ask for guidance.

     

    When you're done with the app, quit it and also quit Terminal.

  • hhguitar Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I went through your recommendations and downloaded OmniDiskSweeper.  It didn't help much though because it just confirmed that the MobileBackups volume is taking up 250 GB.  I need a way to get rid of it.

     

    For some reason the MobileBackups volume is called TylLkFMEt-Li0L_S92RKBO now...

  • Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10 (155,430 points)

    From the menu bar, select

        

     ▹ System Preferences... ▹ Time Machine

      

    If the padlock icon is closed, click it to unlock the settings and authenticate. Turn Time Machine OFF, then back ON and close the preference pane.

  • hhguitar Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    That didn't do anything...

  • Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10 (155,430 points)

    Please post a screenshot of the ODS window that shows what you mean. Be careful not to include any private information.

    Start a reply to this message. Click the camera icon in the toolbar of the editing window and select the image file to upload it. You can also include text in the reply.

  • markymark1975 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Linc, you seem like the only true genius on here, so would truly appreciate your advice on this subject?

     

    I have my 500GB SSD filled with nearly 450GB of 'other' it is absolutely insane, how quick it has filled up, and I really do not know why?

     

    I have an 2TB external drive, so all movies, iTunes etc.. have been placed on there (I partioned the drive - 1TB for Time Machine, 1TB for general storage (movies, itunes etc...).

     

    I am truly running out of space. 15GB free on my drive!!!! It is just getting eaten up at a ridiculous rate.

     

    I also tried the method with mobilebackups Trashme but again get the message -

     

    mv: rename /.MobileBackups.trash to /Trashme: No such file or directory