Previous 1 2 Next 22 Replies Latest reply: Jun 4, 2014 8:04 AM by NikeAdidasGuy Go to original post Branched to a new discussion.
  • thomas_r. Level 7 Level 7 (30,110 points)

    I look forward to soemone that knows wahts gpoing on .

     

    Good luck with that. I actually know what this item is, and have told you what it is. You have, in a subsequent post, turned around and parroted back an abbreviated version of what I said quoted from some other site, so evidently you didn't fully understand what I had to say.

     

    Since listening is a large part of understanding, and you seem not to be in a very listening sort of mood, I think I've responded here as much as I need to. I spent a good amount of time and thought composing my last reply, and I'm not going to waste my time doing that for you when it's not wanted.

  • Guru J Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    sorry your are not correct:- from OSX experts- and if you want to see snapshots over 100 of the damage this trojen has done to my mac just ask.

     

     

    HEUR:Trojan.Script.Iframer. Characteristics ... “JS/Redirector” is a JavaScript Trojanthat redirects the browser to a malicious website. .... CD; Kaspersky - Trojan-Downloader.JS.

    , Trojan.Script.Iframer, 58 279 262, 3.65% ... JS.Iframe.cxk, 1 376 898, 0.09%. 14, Trojan-Downloader.JS.Iframe.cyq, 1 079 163, 0.07%.

     

     

    This trojen is not PC specific. Sorry to give you these facts -´ are you still to advice this is not  a mac issue.

     

    ay 4, 2014 - L Trojan virus is a seriously corruptive virus within any sort of operating system including Mac OS, has ability to make the victimized ... refers to the so-called potentially unwanted programs ( driver-by download). .... to Remove the Adware Completely How to RemoveJS:Downloader-ZY [Trj], Latest Manual Removal Guide ».

     

     

    • R
  • Guru J Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    please direct me to the exact reference of the following---i am sorry all i received was out of date information published in 2013 about malware removal.....If you show me the exact reference to this specific mac trojen dowloader file js.ifr you claim to have made....then I will thank you.

     

     

    HEUR:Trojan.Script.Iframer. Characteristics ... “JS/Redirector” is a JavaScript Trojanthat redirects the browser to a malicious website. .... CD; Kaspersky - Trojan-Downloader.JS.

    , Trojan.Script.Iframer, 58 279 262, 3.65% ... JS.Iframe.cxk, 1 376 898, 0.09%. 14, Trojan-Downloader.JS.Iframe.cyq, 1 079 163, 0.07%.

     

     

    This trojen is not PC specific. Sorry to give you these facts -´ are you still to advice this is not  a mac issue.

     

    ay 4, 2014 - L Trojan virus is a seriously corruptive virus within any sort of operating system including Mac OS, has ability to make the victimized ... refers to the so-called potentially unwanted programs ( driver-by download). .... to Remove the Adware Completely How to RemoveJS:Downloader-ZY [Trj], Latest Manual Removal Guide ».

     

     

    • R
  • Guru J Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    avaScript OSA is a port of the Mozilla JavaScript 1.4.2 scripting system to the Macintosh in ... You can use JavaScript OSA as a scripting language in any Macintosh application supporting OSA ... Why Do I Need JavaScript?

     


    The map needs javascript & displays ok here - you do have javascript enabled ... its almost useless as i can't do much without it enabled , such as use my gmail, etc. ... To view this demo, you'll need Safari 5 on Mac OS X or Windows, Safari on ...

  • NikeAdidasGuy Level 1 Level 1 (15 points)

    Hi, i did read an article on austrailians getting hacked on your website it was pretty interesting.

  • Guru J Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    cool----thanks for the info....please send me the article

  • NikeAdidasGuy Level 1 Level 1 (15 points)

    There is a rapidly-growing topic on Apple’s forums right now in which Australians seem to be having iOS devices getting locked remotely. The affected devices are displaying a message claiming that they have been hacked by “Oleg Pliss” and demanding that a $100 USD payment be sent to a particular Paypal account.

    It’s unclear at this point exactly how this is happening, but it seems evident that the affected users are having their Apple IDs hacked. Typically, such hacks involve things like weak passwords falling to brute force attacks by a botnet or falling for a phishing attack. That doesn’t really explain the fact that all the affected users appear to be located in Australia, however. Perhaps the most likely possibility is that an Australian e-mail provider has been hacked, giving hackers the ability to reset the password of weakly-protected Apple IDs associated with those e-mail addresses. Regardless of how it’s happening, though, those Apple IDs are being compromised.

    Once hackers have access to your Apple ID, they can remotely lock all your iOS devices with a message. They can also see any data stored in iCloud (calendars, contacts, e-mail, notes, etc). If you have a Mac with Back to My Mac enabled, they could potentially get remote access to that. They could also make purchases on your Apple ID. For all these reasons, it’s very important to protect your Apple ID.

    Unfortunately, there are ways that a hacker can lock you out of your Apple IDpermanently. Hackers can change your security questions, which is a hassle to deal with but is technically recoverable. However, they could also enable two-factor authentication, and thus permanently lock you out of your Apple ID! Once two-factor authentication is enabled, Apple cannot help you regain access to your Apple ID.

    If the idea of losing your Apple ID permanently doesn’t scare you, consider two things. First, all your purchases are tied to your Apple ID. Without your Apple ID, you could lose all your purchased music, movies and apps. More importantly, on devices running iOS 7 with Find My iPhone/iPad/iWhatever turned on, a hacker in control of the Apple ID can lock the user out of that device permanently! That’s right… your expensive iPad could be turned into an expensive doorstop. Restoring the device to factory settings will not be possible without the Apple ID, and Apple cannot unlock it for you.

    Affected users will need to regain access to their Apple IDs. Reset the password, and make sure to change it to something very secure. Next, I strongly suggest that you enable two-factor authentication on your Apple ID. Doing so provides additional security, and should prevent the hacker from ever being able to take control of your Apple ID entirely away from you. When you enable this feature, be sure to store the recovery key very carefully! Write it down and put it in a safe, or store it in an encrypted (and well backed-up) place, such as your keychain.

    Once your Apple ID is protected, a remotely locked device can be unlocked by following these directions from Apple:

    http://support.apple.com/kb/ht1212

    For those who might be upset at Apple at policies that make it difficult to regain access to a locked device, consider the opposite. Hackers used to be able to get access to Apple IDs by convincing an Apple tech that they were the owner of the account. Apple’s policies began to change abruptly after Mat Honan had his digital life effectively destroyed by hackers who gained access to his Apple ID.

    Although it’s still unknown exactly what’s going on, Australian users of iOS devices should take heed and secure their Apple IDs, as well as the e-mail accounts associated with their Apple IDs. This is a good opportunity for people elsewhere to review the security of their Apple IDs as well.

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