Previous 1 2 3 Next 30 Replies Latest reply: Jun 27, 2014 7:42 AM by mkaie Go to original post
  • mkaie Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Sad news. I could not fix my wi fi grey out problem   I used two days surfing internet, got sick of it and decided to postpone fixing it until further, but now I ve got huge bill on using mobile data, so I must change this phone.

     

    Humac apple store told that it will cost me in total to check and replace my iPhone4 for about 190euros....
    It really feels bad that I have to pay for something I did not cause. Reading posts about similar problem confirms that.

     

    If anyone knows site or any source where I can write my complain to Apple, so 'this type of problem' can reach bosses and they make some action like offering replacement for free to other people (who will experience the same in future), please reply to this post.

  • mkaie Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Sad news. I could not fix my wi fi grey out problem   I used two days surfing internet, got sick of it and decided to postpone fixing it until further, but now I ve got huge bill on using mobile data, so I must change this phone.

     

    Humac apple store told that it will cost me in total to check and replace my iPhone4 for about 190euros....
    It really feels bad that I have to pay for something I did not cause. Reading posts about similar problem confirms that.

     

    If anyone knows site or any source where I can write my complain to Apple, so 'this type of problem' can reach bosses and they make some action like offering replacement for free to other people (who will experience the same in future), please reply to this post.

  • Mike458 Level 1 Level 1 (25 points)

    stangcbr wrote:

     

    Thank you for your useless comments TJBUSMC1973.  How about a car analogy... would you like to pay 50% of the value of your car to fix (or replace) it following an ECU or TCU update simply because their update wasn't properly regression tested on legacy hardware.  That makes sense! (sarcastic comment)  Then, would you want to pay that much money to buy the same faulty car (refurbished) that already can't handle the newer update.  Forget any future updates.  That makes even more sense! (another sarcastic comment)  You also aren't taking into account the lower present value of the phones in your calculations so they are flawed for that reason too. 

     

    Mkaie, thank you for having common sense and trying to help out. Good luck with your situation.

     

    Your out of warranty iPhone 4Ss would normally cost you $1400 to replace, out of pocket, correct?  In other words, buying them from a retail store, without a cellular contract subsidy, would cost $650 for the 32 GB & $750 for the 64 GB.

     

    But Apple will replace both units for $199 each.

     

    $398 compared to $1400 seems like a very good deal to me, especially considering that if an electronic device is outside of warranty, then the manufacturer has no obligation whatsoever to replace it.  Can you name me an electronics manufacturer that provides free replacements for out-of-warranty devices?

     

    I'm sorry to hear of your situation, but a 71.6% discount seems like more than fair to me.

     

    Perhaps next time you should take advantage of the AppleCare Protection Plan or AppleCare Protection Plan Plus ( http://store.apple.com/us/product/APP_IPHONE_PLUS_AUTO-110480/applecare-for-ipho ne

    ) which gives you two years of protection from date of purchase.  I get it on my iPhones, and when the two years is up, I'm eligible for an upgrade anyways from my carrier, usually for free.

     

    So, my out of pocket expenses per iPhone have always come down to about $50 per year (not counting the cellular service payments, of course).  I've never had to pay for an out-of-warranty service.

     

    Live and learn.  That's what life is about.  Use this experience to make better choices in the future regarding protecting your investments.


  • Mike458 Level 1 Level 1 (25 points)

    mkaie wrote:

     

    Sad news. I could not fix my wi fi grey out problem   I used two days surfing internet, got sick of it and decided to postpone fixing it until further, but now I ve got huge bill on using mobile data, so I must change this phone.

     

    Humac apple store told that it will cost me in total to check and replace my iPhone4 for about 190euros....
    It really feels bad that I have to pay for something I did not cause. Reading posts about similar problem confirms that.

     

    If anyone knows site or any source where I can write my complain to Apple, so 'this type of problem' can reach bosses and they make some action like offering replacement for free to other people (who will experience the same in future), please reply to this post.

     

    www.apple.com/feedback

  • Loner T Level 5 Level 5 (5,775 points)

    I used to own a iPhone 3G, which had WiFi issues. There is a very long discussion when the owners have tried to 're-flow' the electrical connections, using heat guns, freezer tricks, etc. but such tricks do not provide consistent results. Miniaturization and heat dissipation are contradictory and cause electronics to fail. Extended warranties just reduce the pain a bit.

     

    If you can download the iPhone Configuration Utility - iPhone Configuration Utility 3.5 for Mac OS X (or have access to XCode), you can look at the console log of the iPhone and look at messages when it tries to connect to WiFi and see what the issue may be. There is a Windows equivalent utility iPhone Configuration Utility 3.6.2 for Windows. It may save you a bit of heartburn/teeth-gnashing/hand-wringing.

  • Loner T Level 5 Level 5 (5,775 points)

    I also have two iPhone 4s devices. One on 6.x, another on 7.x. Both have a functional WiFi connection without any issues. I wish Apple would allow HW diagnostics that a customer can run on their own to check for any HW issues without a trip to the Genius bar.

  • mkaie Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Thanks for feedback link

     

    Our discontent with Apple is that we must pay for problem we did not cause! This is not discount, this is thievery to me.

     

    When writing '' I get it on my iPhones, and when the two years is up, I'm eligible for an upgrade anyways from my carrier, usually for free. ''
    Does it mean that you change your phone every two years? Just wondering..

  • Mike458 Level 1 Level 1 (25 points)

    mkaie wrote:

     

    Thanks for feedback link

     

    Our discontent with Apple is that we must pay for problem we did not cause! This is not discount, this is thievery to me.

     

    When writing '' I get it on my iPhones, and when the two years is up, I'm eligible for an upgrade anyways from my carrier, usually for free. ''
    Does it mean that you change your phone every two years? Just wondering..

     

    It's not relevant whether you caused the problem or not.  For example, if you had an iPhone that sat, virtually untouched, in a desk drawer for over a year after you first activated it, and after the one year, you discovered it had a defective antenna, you didn't cause that problem.  But the device would be outside of the one-year warranty.  Therefore, you have no valid claim.  The problem occurred after the warranty expired.

     

    Nor did the iOS update 'cause' the problem.  If it was the fault of the iOS update, then EVERY device running the same iOS would have the same problem.

     

    There was a hardware problem with your iPhone that you were unaware of.  That's all.  Perhaps the processor, working overtime and running hot, caused the wi-fi chip to fail.  But that same issue could occur from updating a lot of apps at one time, or heavy multi-tasking.

     

    Your best bet is to call Apple Support, request an exception, and explain that there was no way of you to report this defect within the one year, because there was never a situation that occurred within that one year that could have revealed the defect.  If you present your case politely and rationally, you might get lucky.

     

    From: https://discussions.apple.com/message/24551640#24551640

    i.e.: "If the wi-fi chip was defective from the very beginning, and only the process of an iOS update would create enough stress to reveal this defect, then there was no way for me to report this defect during the normal warranty period.  No other operations on the iPhone created enough stress to reveal this defect, which was present all along.  Therefore, because the device was defective from day of purchase, but there was no way for me to test for that defect, it was impossible for me to report it prior to it being revealed.  The fact that it only revealed after the warranty expired should not infringe upon the validity of my claim."

     

    And yes, I do upgrade every two years.  Why not?  I get a newer piece of hardware, I get to have continued device protection, and I have a spare iPhone (or three, at this point), that I can use if my current one ever needs service.

  • mkaie Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    This comparison with 'virtually untouched device with defect.. and no valid claim after 1 year' shows just greediness of the Apple company.

     

    This is an obvious problem from company side, and as soon as they know about this kind of problem, a normal socially responsible company which makes good profit every year, should make amendments and introduce compensations or something like that for this particular problem type.
    Even you admit that I had a hardware problem from day 1 I bought phone. Feels very unfair to me.

     

    Of course I am being naive to ask Apple to act more socially responsible and trying to find understanding from people here, at the end it is all about money and the profit.

     

    Can you send me one of your spare iPhones , cause I just have one. And if tomorrow I give mine to service I have no phone... must ask around to borrow.

     

    I had so strong believe that Apple phone is the number one with respect to both design and solid hardware that can last more than 4-5 years if you are treating it well. But now I see it is not, to be safe I should have protection plan and upgrade every two years as you do it... Starting to believe in conspiracy theories now about making devices on purpose not lasting long, so people keep buying new ones soon again.

     

    I will try to get lucky tomorrow at Humac

  • TJBUSMC1973 Level 5 Level 5 (7,255 points)

    And can you name another technology company that provides free replacements on devices that are outside of warranty?

     

    Use the script that's been provided.  It's rational, thoughtful, and has a better chance of getting Apple to provide an out-of-warranty exception than ranting & complaining.

     

    Yes, on average, an iPhone will have greater than a two year life span.  All of my iPhones, going back to my first, still work properly.  But I've still purchased the extended coverage, because it's a wise investment.

     

    Most people never get into a automobile accident.  Yet many people still carry coverage greater than the minimum required by law.  Most people never have a serious illness, but still get health coverage.

     

    Your iPhone should be no different.  Protect it proactively.  If it's such a vital part of your life, then it's your responsibility, no one else's, to take proper safeguards.

     

    The fact that you're asking a total stranger to give you one of their iPhones simply shows you want others to foot the bill for your lack or foresight.

  • mkaie Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Oh you edited your post and this addition is very useful. I am actually searching now some consumer laws which i can use tomorrow when talking at service. So good to know about this good argument:

    From: https://discussions.apple.com/message/24551640#24551640

    i.e.: "If the wi-fi chip was defective from the very beginning, and only the process of an iOS update would create enough stress to reveal this defect, then there was no way for me to report this defect during the normal warranty period.  No other operations on the iPhone created enough stress to reveal this defect, which was present all along.  Therefore, because the device was defective from day of purchase, but there was no way for me to test for that defect, it was impossible for me to report it prior to it being revealed.  The fact that it only revealed after the warranty expired should not infringe upon the validity of my claim."


    Thaaanks :-)!

  • TJBUSMC1973 Level 5 Level 5 (7,255 points)

    Where did you purchase the iPhone?  That may have a factor.  IIRC, in the EU, the retailer that sold the device has to provide support for an extended time automatically.  In the US, however, there aren't any consumer laws that will help in this situation.

     

    Your best bet is to use my script.

  • mkaie Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I don't know. But Apple always thrives to perfection, and is number one now, so it should show good example to others how to be more socially responsible
    Yes,again thank you for this script!! Device was defective from day one, and therefore I might claim an exception and get lucky. Let's see what happens.

  • TJBUSMC1973 Level 5 Level 5 (7,255 points)

    Apple does more in these situations than most tech companies.  I was less than a week outside of my (extended) warranty on a PC, and the manufacturer simply told me to purchase an updated computer.  No offer whatsoever of a discount on a replacement or any form of credit for my existing PC.

     

    With Apple, you don't even have to ask for such a consideration.  It's already set in place. 

    Cracked screen (that's obviously not a warranty issue, that's user abuse)?  Discounted replacement. 

    Water damage?  Discounted OOW replacement.

     

    I know of no other tech company that has that or anything similar in place for their products, not without spending extra money.  It's like getting free car insurance, without a monthly premium, and still getting some basic coverage.  Yeah, there's a deductible to pay, but you don't have to pay those monthly premiums.  And if you DO get the higher levels of protection, then not only does your deductible go down, but you get longer coverage.

  • Loner T Level 5 Level 5 (5,775 points)

    mkaie wrote:

     

    I don't know. But Apple always thrives to perfection, and is number one now, so it should show good example to others how to be more socially responsible
    Yes,again thank you for this script!! Device was defective from day one, and therefore I might claim an exception and get lucky. Let's see what happens.

     

    A wireless keyboard, where someone forgot to remove alkaline batteries was replaced for free by just taking it to the Apple Store. An iMac out-of-warranty had a free LCD screen replacement. Social responsibility works both ways. If Apple needs to be responsible, so should the consumer.

     

    I have seen cases where a customer put a hardshell case on a MBP which reduced heat dissipation and caused batteries to prematurely fail on a 15-in Early 2008 MBP. The batteries were failing because the laptop was used in a dusty, hot environment and had a hard plastic case which reduced the surface available for air circulation. The customer never reported this, but would show up every three months with a failed battery which was replaced under AppleCare for almost 36-months (11 batteries to be precise). The clue was that the fans were cleaned and would show up with a lot of dust on the blades when the battery was changed.

     

    You have a failure, it can be fixed, for €190, which seems unacceptable to you. You can try and negotiate, and in most cases, it will work.