2 Replies Latest reply: Jul 15, 2014 3:52 PM by red_menace
Matteo_999 Level 1 Level 1

Hi everyone,


a few days ago I found a method to give an interface to my simple AppleScript application. This is the AppleScript ObjC but I noticed that there are many differences between the basic AppleScript and AppleScript ObjC. For example how can i program Radio Buttons? How can i get started?


Thanks in advance!

Reply by Frank Caggiano on Jul 15, 2014 5:54 AM Helpful
A search for applescript objective-c will return s number of examples and tutorial sites to get you started. First thing however is you need to install Xcode. You can get that at the Mac App Store for free, good luck
Reply by red_menace on Jul 15, 2014 3:52 PM Helpful
The main difference is that AppleScriptObjC provides a way to access the Cocoa frameworks (the various Cocoa classes and methods are what performs the magic for stuff like radio buttons) - for example, take a look at the AppKit Framework Reference, which includes NSButton and NSMatrix.  There is an introductory tutorial on MacScripter.net, but most of the work is just finding your way around Cocoa, which has a bit of a learning curve since most of the documentation is in Objective-C.  MacBook Pro / OS X Mavericks (10.9.3) / Xcode 5.1.1 / RubyMotion FTW

All replies

  • Frank Caggiano Level 7 Level 7

    A search for applescript objective-c will return s number of examples and tutorial sites to get you started.

     

    First thing however is you need to install Xcode. You can get that at the Mac App Store for free,

     

    good luck

  • red_menace Level 6 Level 6
    expertise.desktops
    Desktops

    The main difference is that AppleScriptObjC provides a way to access the Cocoa frameworks (the various Cocoa classes and methods are what performs the magic for stuff like radio buttons) - for example, take a look at the AppKit Framework Reference, which includes NSButton and NSMatrixThere is an introductory tutorial on MacScripter.net, but most of the work is just finding your way around Cocoa, which has a bit of a learning curve since most of the documentation is in Objective-C.

     

     

    MacBook Pro / OS X Mavericks (10.9.3) / Xcode 5.1.1 / RubyMotion FTW