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Question: crashed: too many corpses being created

After installing a Yosemite update on my laptop, when it boots, it seems to all be fine until about the loading bar is maybe 2/3 done, then slows to a crawl and takes another 20 minutes or so to reach full - where it stays. I have no cursor or anything else during this time, but my caps lock button light will go on an off when I press it.

I've tried:
-Resetting PRAM/NVRAM
-Booting into recovery mode and repairing the drive/partition. This seemed to be done successfully.
-Booting hardware diagnostics and doing a check. It says everything is fine.
-Safe boot. Takes the same length of time and hangs at the same place, so honestly not sure if I'm even doing it right.
-Verbose mode says every single process has crashed, with 'too many corpses being created.'. (picture - note that it's not actually blurry, just scrolling pretty fast so a photo wasn't the best)

It's a Mid-2011 15" Macbook pro, 2.2GHz with a 750GB hard drive and 16GB of RAM. I'm still doing a few other checks (currently re-installing 10.10 using a thumb drive to see if that fixes it), but has anyone got any ideas or had a similar problem?

MacBook Pro (15-inch Early 2011), OS X Yosemite (10.10.3)

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Question marked as Helpful

Sep 30, 2017 1:30 AM in response to Zcomuto In response to Zcomuto

So, I’m having the exact same issue on my recent install of High Sierra.


Having attempted to reinstall OS X multiple times, I’m almost at the limit of my patience. Even more frustrating is that I made a small partition on my HD and ran a clean install of High Sierra there, which works perfectly.


What Zcomuto was probably referring to is “OSInstallerScripts” - this is/was an option

that OS X’s installer app used to offer in a customisable install. It is used to install or repair the boot script that required for a Mac after a new install of OS X. Only problem is that OS X installer doesn’t seem to offer a custom install option anymore, so you can’t specifically choose to do this anymore (except for the developer beta installer, which is customisable, according to info found on Google)


I found this out by starting up my broken install in single-user verbose mode and tracking the script. I got an infinite amount of lines telling me each individual process had “crashed” with “too many corpses being created”. I had (and still have) no idea what this means, but found online that people installing older versions of OS X (and Hackintoshes, by the way) were able to fix the same problem, by running a custom install and selecting OSInstallScripts only, without reinstalling the whole OS


I’m posting this so people with the same issue today might know what they’re dealing with, and in the faint hope that anyone reading knows how to isolate OSInstallerScripts, to run for an install of High Sierra.

Question marked as Helpful

Apr 13, 2018 8:19 AM in response to Zcomuto In response to Zcomuto

So, here is the latest solution from Apple:


  1. Restart your Mac and hold down Command-R tostart up from macOS Recovery.
  2. If the startup drive has FileVault turned on, open Disk Utility and proceed with the next step. If FileVault is off, skip to step 5.
  3. Select the startup drive and click Mount in the Disk Utility toolbar. When prompted, select a login name and enter the password. Then click Unlock to mount the startup drive.
  4. Quit Disk Utility.
  5. Choose Utilities > Terminal from the menu bar.
  6. Type this command in Terminal:cd /Volumes/Macintosh\ HD/var/db/caches/opendirectory/
    Modify the command to reflect the name of the startup volume if it's not Macintosh HD. Remember to use an escape character \ before each white space in the command path.
  7. Press Return.
  8. Type this command in Terminal:mv ./mbr_cache ./mbr_cache-old
    The mv Terminal command is safer than the rm command. Errant white space in an rm command can destroy the user's data.
  9. Press Return.
  10. Quit Terminal.
  11. Choose Apple () menu > Restart.

The first startup after running these commands takes longer than usual as the cache is recreated. Subsequent startups will take the normal amount of time.

Hope this will help you 🙂

Frank

Question marked as Helpful

Oct 1, 2017 4:49 AM in response to aka_dapper In response to aka_dapper

The following didn't work for me, but creating/fixing the file rc.server has worked for many others with a similar problem. To do this, boot up your Mac in Single User mode (hold Cmd+S immediately as you hear the Apple chime).


Once the initial verbose script has finished loading, enter the following two lines:

mount -uw /

/usr/bin/nano /etc/rc.server

The first line allows your Mac's system files to be written to. The second line opens/creates rc.server as a file, using the nano process. Once the file opens, delete any script that already exists (don't worry if it's empty) and then enter the following two lines:

#!/bin/sh

/usr/sbin/BootCacheControl jettison

Once finished, save your changes with Ctrl+O and then exit nano with Ctrl+X. Your Mac may then automatically reboot, but if it returns you to Single User mode, enter the following line:

reboot


Credit to Chris Hotte (a.k.a NightFlight) for originally discovering this fix


Hope this works for you!


Note: if you're using a UK-type keyboard like myself, you might have a hard time creating the # hash symbol required for the rc.server script. UK input requires Alt+3 to create #, but Alt seems to have no effect within Single User mode. To get around this, I used Recovery Mode (boot up and hold Cmd+R) and changed my input to a US keyboard, then rebooted. US input uses Shift+3 to get #, which works fine in Single User mode

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Jun 28, 2015 2:15 PM in response to Eric Root In response to Eric Root

To update, I managed to get it working. For some reason the OS was hanging (for over 10 hours) during the install process, but only installing the OSInstallScripts fixed the issue.


Thanks for your help, though. I'm sure those links will come in handy in the future.

Jun 28, 2015 2:15 PM

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Question marked as Helpful

Sep 30, 2017 1:30 AM in response to Zcomuto In response to Zcomuto

So, I’m having the exact same issue on my recent install of High Sierra.


Having attempted to reinstall OS X multiple times, I’m almost at the limit of my patience. Even more frustrating is that I made a small partition on my HD and ran a clean install of High Sierra there, which works perfectly.


What Zcomuto was probably referring to is “OSInstallerScripts” - this is/was an option

that OS X’s installer app used to offer in a customisable install. It is used to install or repair the boot script that required for a Mac after a new install of OS X. Only problem is that OS X installer doesn’t seem to offer a custom install option anymore, so you can’t specifically choose to do this anymore (except for the developer beta installer, which is customisable, according to info found on Google)


I found this out by starting up my broken install in single-user verbose mode and tracking the script. I got an infinite amount of lines telling me each individual process had “crashed” with “too many corpses being created”. I had (and still have) no idea what this means, but found online that people installing older versions of OS X (and Hackintoshes, by the way) were able to fix the same problem, by running a custom install and selecting OSInstallScripts only, without reinstalling the whole OS


I’m posting this so people with the same issue today might know what they’re dealing with, and in the faint hope that anyone reading knows how to isolate OSInstallerScripts, to run for an install of High Sierra.

Sep 30, 2017 1:30 AM

Reply Helpful (27)
Question marked as Helpful

Oct 1, 2017 4:49 AM in response to aka_dapper In response to aka_dapper

The following didn't work for me, but creating/fixing the file rc.server has worked for many others with a similar problem. To do this, boot up your Mac in Single User mode (hold Cmd+S immediately as you hear the Apple chime).


Once the initial verbose script has finished loading, enter the following two lines:

mount -uw /

/usr/bin/nano /etc/rc.server

The first line allows your Mac's system files to be written to. The second line opens/creates rc.server as a file, using the nano process. Once the file opens, delete any script that already exists (don't worry if it's empty) and then enter the following two lines:

#!/bin/sh

/usr/sbin/BootCacheControl jettison

Once finished, save your changes with Ctrl+O and then exit nano with Ctrl+X. Your Mac may then automatically reboot, but if it returns you to Single User mode, enter the following line:

reboot


Credit to Chris Hotte (a.k.a NightFlight) for originally discovering this fix


Hope this works for you!


Note: if you're using a UK-type keyboard like myself, you might have a hard time creating the # hash symbol required for the rc.server script. UK input requires Alt+3 to create #, but Alt seems to have no effect within Single User mode. To get around this, I used Recovery Mode (boot up and hold Cmd+R) and changed my input to a US keyboard, then rebooted. US input uses Shift+3 to get #, which works fine in Single User mode

Oct 1, 2017 4:49 AM

Reply Helpful (8)

Oct 4, 2017 12:28 PM in response to AlexGzz In response to AlexGzz

Hi AlexGzz


The command jettison should be part of the second line of code, i.e:

/usr/sbin/BootCacheControl jettison

- with no line breaks


If this doesn't work, it seems like you have a similar issue to my own. If you start up in Single User mode and then continue to boot by entering exit <and pressing enter>, could you advise what the last lines of code are?

Oct 4, 2017 12:28 PM

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Nov 22, 2017 5:11 PM in response to aka_dapper In response to aka_dapper

Hi,


I understand most of the part, but the one i don't undertsand is : delete any script that already exists.

Since I've upgrade to high sierra, my mac won't open (stuck on the apple logo). I've try a lot of thing, but nothing is working.

Nov 22, 2017 5:11 PM

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Question: crashed: too many corpses being created