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sassiprincss Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
I recently lost my IPod and feel that someone probably picked it up. I noticed when I opened my I Tunes account that it showed my IPod's serial number, so I was wondering if there is any way for I Tunes to track if someone else opens an account with that particular serial number. Please respond!
  • PT Level 7 Level 7 (20,880 points)
    Nope, sorry there is no way to do this. Unless the person who finds it turns it in to where ever it was lost (librarian, office manager, whatever), it is gone for good.

    Patrick
  • Chris CA Level 9 Level 9 (77,420 points)
    You need to file a police report and a lost report with wherever you lost it and include the serial number.
  • sassiprincss Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Thank you both for responding, but the issue has solved itself. One of my co-workers found and returned my I Pod to me.
  • daveynielsen Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    i just recently bought a new ipod nano (blue) and im sure someone stole it during lunch about 2 weeks ago.

    can i file a police and lost report?

       
  • varjak paw Level 10 Level 10 (169,830 points)
    Contact you local police department and ask, Davey. Only they can tell you whether they'll accept a theft report this long after the fact.
  • kanlhitit Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    I was wondering the same thing. You would think that iTunes would be able to get a hit off of a serial number anytime that the new owner "thief" tried to put new music on it. With all of the technology out there today you would think this would be an easy thing for Apple to do for us customers that have made them soooo rich. Dont tell me that its not possible, its just greediness because it means that we have to go buy another iPod.
  • PT Level 7 Level 7 (20,880 points)
    It isn't greediness. Instead it is that many of us don't see a need for "big brother" tracking features and reporting back to Apple how, where, and when we use our devices. Apple knows there would be a large backlash if they implemented any sort of tracking system as many other companies have discovered when they have tried such things.

    Patrick
  • OzzieCat Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    This isn't about privacy, as Patrick claims; rather, it's about property. Apple already has a tracking system -- they require your serial number so that "unauthorized" systems don't log in. Contrary to what Patrick says, they already know what you download, and actively seek to find it -- think of the tracking cookies that Apple and most other websites place on your system. Compare an Ipod to a credit card and the logic is evident; Apple knows who is logging in and where and when, and what they are downloading. Ipods are reportedly one of the most pilferable items around. As with credit cards, Apple's denial of service to a registered Ipod which was reported as stolen would seriously diminish the "steal value" of Ipods. My Ipod was recently stolen. I loved the product before it went missing, but if Apple is unable or unwilling to assist customers in this regard, it certainly gives me pause as to whether I should buy another highly pilferable $400 Ipod, much less a $600 Iphone.
  • PT Level 7 Level 7 (20,880 points)
    Hogwash!

    And besides, why would Apple bother going to all that trouble for $200 iPods when NO computer companies even do this for their $1000+ laptop systems. Laptops are stolen all the time.

    Or why don't car manufacturers do this with $20,000+ automobiles?

    I will tell you why. Because these companies make consumer products in very competive markets and trying to be a good doobie in tracking each and everyone one of those products so the few of you who gets yours stolen can track your device, laptop, automobile, etc. is simply not economical and quite frankly, way outside the realm of their business and business models.

    Not to mention, with the case of iPods, I would guess MOST of the stolen iPods are the result of poor judgement on the owner's part. In other words, I doubt most stolen iPods are taken from people's homes or from a pad-locked locker but instead are left in unlocked lockers, on the front seat of a car, in their jacket pocket that is handed over to the coat check person, and other "give the thief a perfect opportunity" situations.

    Why should Apple or any other company jump through hoops because the owner was stupid enough to leave their backpack unattended at the library while they went to the bathroom?

    Patrick
  • OzzieCat Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    You make a very interesting rapid intellectual shift (and a surprisingly prompt answer, I might add) from an argument based on "privacy" to one based strictly on an alleged business decision by Apple... I'm not sure what the "trouble" Apple would have to go through is, since consumer ability to modify the content of an Ipod has to go directly through Apple (unless one were to advocate or create online "chop shops" for Ipod loading). Mainly, though, it doesn't follow the logic of Apple's mantra --- "don't steal music, because we're watching" (Apple's liability), whose logical and very beneficial corollary would be, "and don't steal Ipods" (customer's liability, but one where Apple could readily help). The issue of Ipod theft goes way beyond unlocked lockers -- as you know, at least one young man was killed for his Ipod, causing authorities to recommend customers get headphones that are another color than white. Your rather NeoCon answer is to blame the victim. This issue is actually a business decision just like with credit card companies; once liability was settled in favor of the consumer, credit card companies quickly devised methods (even before the 'Net) of tracking cards. My contention is that reducing the "pilferability" of Ipods is a win-win proposition for Apple, increasing the salability of the product while making the company a more responsible member of the community. "Caveat emptor" and "it's a horrible world out there" just don't track with the Apple image. "We'll protect our customer as much as the customer wants us to" certainly does. Who knows, this may be something to bring up at the next stockholder's meeting.
  • Chris CA Level 9 Level 9 (77,420 points)
    since consumer ability to modify the content of an Ipod has to go directly through Apple
    Huh?
    Not sure where you got this info but it is totally incorrect.
    I load my iPod a few times a week (as do millions of others) with Apple having absolutely zero knowledge of it.
  • LoboJeff Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    All this discussion fails to recognize that 'finders keepers' does hold up under the law. If it is reported stolen, as in a burglary or strong arm/armed robbery, then it can be marked as 'theft' if it goes missing.....finders keepers. Suppose circuit city got ripped of for a crate of units and had the serial #s to give to police and insurance...... you bet your booty Apple would be contacted.
  • OzzieCat Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    since consumer ability to modify the content of an
    Ipod has to go directly through Apple

    Huh?
    Not sure where you got this info but it is totally
    incorrect.
    I load my iPod a few times a week (as do millions of
    others) with Apple having absolutely zero knowledge
    of it.


    Hmmm... Chris, have you ever noticed that your serial number is part of the reload?
  • Chris CA Level 9 Level 9 (77,420 points)
    You seem to be talking about something I have no idea about.
    have you ever noticed that your serial number is part of the reload?
    No idea what you mean.
    The serial # is part of what "reload"?
    If I am not connected to the internet, I can reload my iPod.
    How would Apple get notified of anything?

    p.s.
    Do I need a foil hat?
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