Looks like no one’s replied in a while. To start the conversation again, simply ask a new question.

Question:

Question: I need some advice about RAM

I am considering getting more RAM for my computer before I try to upgrade it from Snow Leopard to El Captian to Sierra. (If it would even be advisable to upgrade it). I have 2 GB of RAM that came with my computer. Apple says that is enough for Sierra, but I am afraid that my computer would be really slow. That's why I think it might be best to upgrade the RAM first.


I have no idea what kind of RAM I should get, or even where to get it from. Does anyone know?


The computer is a MacBook (13-inch, Mid 2010) MacBook7,1 MC516xx/A.


Thank you.

MacBook

Posted on

Reply

Page content loaded

Oct 22, 2016 7:46 AM in response to Arwen4CJ In response to Arwen4CJ

You should be able to go to at least 8GB and your Mac may even go to 16GB. See

<https://eshop.macsales.com/shop/memory/Apple_MacBook_MacBook_Pro/Upgrade/DDR3>


I would go to at least 8GB. And if what I'm reading on the above web page and the information you have given, then you can go for 16GB.


But while you are looking at upgrading RAM, also consider replacing the internal hard disk with an SSD, or keep the hard disk and replace the DVD drive with an SSD. You can find both kinds of conversion kits at <http://macsales.com>. I used a DVD conversion kit on my 2009 27" iMac and it runs faster than when it was new.

Oct 22, 2016 7:46 AM

Reply Helpful

Oct 22, 2016 7:48 AM in response to BobHarris In response to BobHarris

PS. I've also used <http://crucial.com> successfully on my Macs. So I'm not trying to push MacSales (OWC). Both a very reliable Mac RAM vendors, with very good return/repair reputations.

Oct 22, 2016 7:48 AM

Reply Helpful

Oct 22, 2016 9:05 AM in response to BobHarris In response to BobHarris

Thanks for your help everyone. I looked at the two websites -- OWC and Crucial. I also looked at the applestore website to see what current computers running Sierra are coming with. It looks like a few of them have 4GB of RAM, but most have 8GB RAM, while a few have 16GB RAM.


Given that information, I think I will go with the 8GB RAM -- just because it seems to be sufficient for new computers running Sierra. However, there is a note that Apple only supports up to 4 GB of RAM on my computer, while third parties have determined it can go up to 16GB RAM.


Why is there a discrepancy, and is there a compelling reason to stick with Apple's 4 GB RAM limit? Is there a risk of going over the 4 GB RAM limit?


OWC sells up to 16 GB RAM for my system, while Crucial sticks with Apple's limit of 4 GB RAM.


If there are no risks of going beyond 4 GB RAM, the 8 GB RAM sounds best. If there are risks associated with going beyond 4 GB RAM, then I would be best off with the 4 GB RAM.

Oct 22, 2016 9:05 AM

Reply Helpful

Oct 22, 2016 9:11 AM in response to BobHarris In response to BobHarris

Oh, as for the advice regarding hard drives, is there a good reason to replace the hard drive with a SSD? My current hard drive seems to be working well. If it were to give out, I would definitely consider replacing it with a SSD. Basically, what I need to know is would not having a SSD impact the performance on Sierra greatly?


I definitely want to keep the CD drive, as I actually still use it to import my music CDs onto iTunes, as well as to play really old computer games.

Oct 22, 2016 9:11 AM

Reply Helpful

Oct 22, 2016 9:29 AM in response to Arwen4CJ In response to Arwen4CJ

Arwen4CJ wrote:


Oh, as for the advice regarding hard drives, is there a good reason to replace the hard drive with a SSD? My current hard drive seems to be working well. If it were to give out, I would definitely consider replacing it with a SSD. Basically, what I need to know is would not having a SSD impact the performance on Sierra greatly?


I definitely want to keep the CD drive, as I actually still use it to import my music CDs onto iTunes, as well as to play really old computer games.

Speed!


I suspect that those 4GB Macs you were looking at had an SSD for storage, so that when they did need to page and swap data to disk, it was very VERY FAST, so you do not notice the lack of RAM nearly as much.


The speed accessing an SSD vs a rotating hard disk is orders of magnitude faster.


Also, while your hard disk may appear to be doing fine, it is also possible, due to its age, that it is starting to do more silent retries when asked to read data. It is a mechanical device and subject to wear and tear.


You do not need to do an SSD at this time, but if you find that Sierra feels really slow compared to Snow Leopard, and you have removed all the unnecessary 3rd party additions you have accumulated over the years (EtreCheck can help with that <http://etrecheck.com>), and you want to keep that Mac, then consider an SSD upgrade.


As for the DVD, you can get an external enclosure for the DVD and connect it via USB for the few times you need to import CDs. That is what I did with my iMac's DVD.


I am very serious that when I went from Snow Leopard to El Capitan last Christmas, the SSD made my iMac run faster than when it was on Snow Leopard. I was already at 16GB so the RAM was a constant for me. About 6 months later I replaced the disk in my Macbook Pro with an SSD, and again, it is faster than when it was running on the original operating system it shipped with (Lion), but now it is running El Capitan.

Oct 22, 2016 9:29 AM

Reply Helpful
User profile for user: Arwen4CJ

Question: I need some advice about RAM