5 Replies Latest reply: Jan 19, 2007 3:58 PM by Kurt Weber
John Leggatt Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
January 8, 2007

Since the early 1990s I have used WordPerfect for Macintosh, a wonderful program that still functions well for my needs under Classic. (It's a tragedy that WP for Mac was taken away from us.) However, Classic is no longer supported by Apple on it's new products, so the day will come sometime this year when I will have to upgrade to a new Classic-less Mac, leaving behind the rich legacy of word processing files I've created.

I am impressed by the range of power and ease of use of Pages 2, and am seriously considering changing my word processor to that program. However, I am dismayed to discover that there is no filter or other means to open any of my WordPerfect for Mac files.

A second word processor program I am examining is Nisus Writer Express 2.6, a program that to me is not nearly as feature rich or easy to use as Pages 2. However, Nisus DOES all me to open my WordPerfect files, a critical feature that permits me to retain access to my huge library of documents (even if its formatting of those files is not entirely accurate). It is hard to justify switching to Pages when I cannot open a file with a different file format.

Once I switch to a new Mac, one way to access to my WordPerfect for Mac files is to open them in Nisus, save them in RTF, then open that file in Pages...not so appealing a process.

I'd like to urge Apple to consider including a filter to allow future versions of Pages to open WordPerfect for Mac and other nonstandard programs. I am confident that this feature could be implemented without using a significant amount of Apple resources in developing Pages.

Any other ideas?

Thanks!

jl

PowerBook G4   Mac OS X (10.4.8)   A Classic problem

PowerBook G4   Mac OS X (10.4.8)   A Classic problem
  • DennisG Level 5 Level 5 (6,455 points)
    John,

    I think that's a fine suggestion. To get it implemented in a future version of Pages, though, you've got to do more than post it in this discussion group, because there's no guarantee the Pages team even reads these posts. Open up Pages, and from the Pages menu, select Send Feedback.

    -Dennis
  • Ken. Level 6 Level 6 (10,225 points)
    There's always MacLink Plus. You might want to try NeoOffice (free). NeoOffice will open a .wpd file, it just might open the older format. I believe AppleWorks 4, if you can find a copy, will do it as well and should run under Rosetta.

    An odd thought: I wonder if the latest Windows version will open these old files? You could boot up Windows and run WordPerfect there. It might be worth asking Corel.

    I've had a lot of favorite word processors over the years but after a while and far too many conversions I keep to simpler, more universal formats, like rtf, if a document has to have longevity.
  • Peggy Level 8 Level 8 (38,530 points)
    I believe AppleWorks 4, if you can find a copy, will do it as well and should run under Rosetta.

    All versions of ClarisWorks & AppleWorks 5, which do have translators for WordPerfect, won't run under Rosetta. They require Classic. Unfortunately, AppleWorks 6 which does run in OS X (& very well under Rosetta), does not have the translators.

  • Ken. Level 6 Level 6 (10,225 points)
    Thanks, I'm a bit out of touch these days. I did not think of that.
  • Kurt Weber Level 6 Level 6 (13,945 points)
    I have been opening Word Perfect for Windows files on the free AbiWord. It is not an elegant solution but it works and is free. There is also the free, Open Source NeoOffice

    Translation is always an iffy issue. The more complicated your docs are, the less accurate your translation. This applies to most programs not just Word Perfect.

    It is also doubtful that a no-longer developed program will be added to the list of translators. I wouldn't hold my breath.

    I know where you are coming from. I have used Appleworks for years and it would be difficult if none of my old files would translate. Since Appleworks is also going the way of the dodo I need to consider the alternatives.

    Kurt