Related Article

Get help using Find My Friends

Looks like no one’s replied in a while. To start the conversation again, simply ask a new question.

Question:

Question: iCloud password compromise and Find my Friends anomaly

I called Support to query about apple ID notification on my iPhone 8 that someone was attempting to use iCloud password in Denver (Showed map of Denver)-I live in Western PA. Not allowing this,I got a follow up notification to change password (which I did).



One thing strange that happened while we were on the phone together was a text msg from a buddy of mine who lives 2 hours north of me in Erie, PA.

We aren’t that social, but, his phone txt me with a map saying “current location”.

I called him and asked where he was and if he sent this strange message. He said he was at his daughter’s address (the pin on the text map), and,”No”, he had not sent a message. I told him I had tried out “Find Friend” with my wife’s phone yesterday. But, had turned it off. He said, he didn't even know about the "Find App.". I called Support back. I was told, this happens all the time. I said this is a statistical coincidence or (insert guess here). Any one want to offer explanation of the two events?

Posted on

Reply
Question marked as Helpful

Nov 11, 2017 2:08 PM in response to blueque In response to blueque

FWIW, I have a few potential "explanations:"

  1. The location information is not always accurate ... but shouldn't be excessively inaccurate.
  2. If you or the other party, uses a VPN, then where the VPN exit point resides may throw off the location data.
  3. Your or the other party's Apple ID may have been compromised.
  4. There are a number of posts here where folks reported a similar issue as yours. In a number of cases, these notifications have been SPAM ... trying to get you to "change your Apple ID's password."

Question marked as Helpful

Nov 11, 2017 2:31 PM in response to blueque In response to blueque

To successfully "hack into" an Apple ID would require both the ID's username & password. If two-step verification or two-factor authentication was enabled on the ID, then it would also require the hacker to have one of the account's trusted devices. FYI. An Apple ID "username" = a valid email address.


If someone did attempt to use your Apple ID unsuccessfully, you should get a warning ... but, again, these warning notifications have been spoofed in some instances. Your best line of defense is to contact Apple's Apple ID Account security team first.


Ref: If you think your Apple ID has been compromised - Apple Support

There’s more to the conversation

Read all replies

Page content loaded

Question marked as Helpful

Nov 11, 2017 2:08 PM in response to blueque In response to blueque

FWIW, I have a few potential "explanations:"

  1. The location information is not always accurate ... but shouldn't be excessively inaccurate.
  2. If you or the other party, uses a VPN, then where the VPN exit point resides may throw off the location data.
  3. Your or the other party's Apple ID may have been compromised.
  4. There are a number of posts here where folks reported a similar issue as yours. In a number of cases, these notifications have been SPAM ... trying to get you to "change your Apple ID's password."

Nov 11, 2017 2:08 PM

Reply Helpful (1)

Nov 11, 2017 2:08 PM in response to blueque In response to blueque

follow up question to above...Could the iCloud attempt have been triggered by the accidental or (mis)use of my username (rather than my password)? Could they have tried 3 times with any password and my correct username, just to kick out the warning?

Nov 11, 2017 2:08 PM

Reply Helpful
Question marked as Helpful

Nov 11, 2017 2:31 PM in response to blueque In response to blueque

To successfully "hack into" an Apple ID would require both the ID's username & password. If two-step verification or two-factor authentication was enabled on the ID, then it would also require the hacker to have one of the account's trusted devices. FYI. An Apple ID "username" = a valid email address.


If someone did attempt to use your Apple ID unsuccessfully, you should get a warning ... but, again, these warning notifications have been spoofed in some instances. Your best line of defense is to contact Apple's Apple ID Account security team first.


Ref: If you think your Apple ID has been compromised - Apple Support

Nov 11, 2017 2:31 PM

Reply Helpful (1)
User profile for user: blueque

Question: iCloud password compromise and Find my Friends anomaly