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Question: Good way to convert (scan) 35mm slides onto disk or cloud

What is a good way to scan 35mm slides to disk or cloud. My photos are in Apple "Photos". Need to buy a scanner device, eg Canon or Epson?

MacBook Air, iOS 10.3.3

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I'd really go for more than 600 samples per inch for the scanner resolution. For prints it is fine, but I do not scan to create prints but to view the photos in a slideshow on a computer.


The scanned photos should be looking good in a slideshow on the display of your Mac you will be using ten years from now.


When I started scanning my slides twenty years ago, I thought a pixel size of 1200 pixels at the longest edge would suffice on any display. Now I have to scan most of the slides all over again, because the 1200 pixels barely suffice for the Retina display of my 15" MBPr with 2880 x1800 pixels. And on a large 27" display they are really a sad sight.

A quick calculation. A 35mm slide has a size of of 36mm x 24mm or 1.4173228 x 1 inch.


We have to scan a 35mm slide with a sample rate of 2042 samples per inch to get an image file that will look sharp fully enlarged on a 15" Retina display. And to get an image of the same quality as my iPhone 5s is taking (3264 x 2448 pixels) the scanner would need a sample of 2331 samples per inch. Flatbed photo scanners can do that: https://files.support.epson.com/htmldocs/prv30ph/prv30phug/specs_2.htm

The scanner above is also sampling the colors at a high resolution, so you can improve the colors using a photo editor .


In addition to getting a scanner you will probably want to get a large external drive to hold the originals of the scans you collect if you are scanning at al large sampling rate.

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Nov 15, 2017 1:53 PM in response to bobpete77 In response to bobpete77

Slides are tiny. When you are scanning slides, you will need to buy a scanner with a very high optical resolution. it should be able to see all east 200 pixels per inch or your scanned photos will not show much detail. And try to go for a high intensity resolution, so you will be able to see details in the highlights and shadows.

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Nov 15, 2017 4:37 PM in response to bobpete77 In response to bobpete77

Don't get a dedicated slide scanner because when you finish your project you'll be left with a nice door stop.


Both Canon and Epson have flat top scanners that are capable of scanning transparencies and slides. They have holders that can hold up to 6 slides at a time for scanning. I would scan at 600 dpi so that I would have image large enough to print an 8 x 10 at 300 dpi.


The Canon scanner is the Canon CanoScan 9000F Mark II Film & Document Scanner. Epson has several models, Perfection V600, V800 and V850. They all scan both photos and transparencies/slides.


There are other manufacturers that offer transparency scanners but Canon and Epson are they only ones I'm familiar with.

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Nov 15, 2017 1:53 PM in response to bobpete77 In response to bobpete77

Slides are tiny. When you are scanning slides, you will need to buy a scanner with a very high optical resolution. it should be able to see all east 200 pixels per inch or your scanned photos will not show much detail. And try to go for a high intensity resolution, so you will be able to see details in the highlights and shadows.

Nov 15, 2017 1:53 PM

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Nov 15, 2017 4:37 PM in response to bobpete77 In response to bobpete77

Don't get a dedicated slide scanner because when you finish your project you'll be left with a nice door stop.


Both Canon and Epson have flat top scanners that are capable of scanning transparencies and slides. They have holders that can hold up to 6 slides at a time for scanning. I would scan at 600 dpi so that I would have image large enough to print an 8 x 10 at 300 dpi.


The Canon scanner is the Canon CanoScan 9000F Mark II Film & Document Scanner. Epson has several models, Perfection V600, V800 and V850. They all scan both photos and transparencies/slides.


There are other manufacturers that offer transparency scanners but Canon and Epson are they only ones I'm familiar with.

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Nov 15, 2017 4:37 PM

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Nov 15, 2017 11:47 PM in response to Old Toad In response to Old Toad

I'd really go for more than 600 samples per inch for the scanner resolution. For prints it is fine, but I do not scan to create prints but to view the photos in a slideshow on a computer.


The scanned photos should be looking good in a slideshow on the display of your Mac you will be using ten years from now.


When I started scanning my slides twenty years ago, I thought a pixel size of 1200 pixels at the longest edge would suffice on any display. Now I have to scan most of the slides all over again, because the 1200 pixels barely suffice for the Retina display of my 15" MBPr with 2880 x1800 pixels. And on a large 27" display they are really a sad sight.

A quick calculation. A 35mm slide has a size of of 36mm x 24mm or 1.4173228 x 1 inch.


We have to scan a 35mm slide with a sample rate of 2042 samples per inch to get an image file that will look sharp fully enlarged on a 15" Retina display. And to get an image of the same quality as my iPhone 5s is taking (3264 x 2448 pixels) the scanner would need a sample of 2331 samples per inch. Flatbed photo scanners can do that: https://files.support.epson.com/htmldocs/prv30ph/prv30phug/specs_2.htm

The scanner above is also sampling the colors at a high resolution, so you can improve the colors using a photo editor .


In addition to getting a scanner you will probably want to get a large external drive to hold the originals of the scans you collect if you are scanning at al large sampling rate.

Nov 15, 2017 11:47 PM

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Nov 16, 2017 9:27 AM in response to léonie In response to léonie

Thanks... Very helpful for seeing where I am with this, and the scope. I have a Canon PIXMA990 flatbed multi-purpose scanner (five years old), for which I do not find any info in the manual regarding scanning slides. I am considering the PacImage7200

Nov 16, 2017 9:27 AM

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Nov 16, 2017 10:14 AM in response to bobpete77 In response to bobpete77

This page lists a Canon Pixma 990 with these specifications:


https://www.usa.canon.com/internet/portal/us/home/support/details/printers/suppo rt-inkjet-printer/mp-series/pixma-mp990


Is that your scanner/printer? The resolution would be perfect for slides and it also lists film scan.


Scanner


Scanner Type


Flatbed


Scanning Element


Charged-Coupled Device (CCD)


Max. Resolutions


Optical:4800 x 9600 dpi
Interpolated:19,200 x 19,200 dpi


Scanner Features


Auto Scan Mode4, Film Scan, Gutter Shadow Correction, Network Scan, Push Scan, Scan to Memory, White LED


Color Depth


48-bit internal/24-bit external


Max. Document Size

8.5 x 11.7


Nov 16, 2017 10:14 AM

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Nov 17, 2017 6:59 PM in response to léonie In response to léonie

I apologize! My current machine is Canon PIX MA922. I see no slide-scan function there. The machine is about four years old, has served for personal needs e.g., Pages, tax returns, etc. I will go to a laser printer with little hesitation.


Apple Photos is my largest file... about 1500 pics. I hope to scan in another 1500, and store in

Nov 17, 2017 6:59 PM

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Question: Good way to convert (scan) 35mm slides onto disk or cloud