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Question: "Disk User" Showing up on EFI boot screen after a clean install with APFS Encryption

Hi, I am hoping somebody can help me.


I did a clean install of High Sierra,10.13.1 on my mid 2014 15" MBP, erased the drive using CMD+R, went in to Disk Utility, erased existing volume then created an encrypted APFS volume, then proceeded to freshly install High Sierra. After install, I now have this 'Disk User' user account showing up on the boot screen, then my actual User Account, then the Guest User account.


Everything seems to work fine and Disk Utility says the HDD is APFS encrypted, but I don't understand why "Disk User" is present on boot next to my actual OS account.


This is the second time I attempted a clean install this way, and I would rather not sit through another 4 hours of the install pain (each time it took around 4 hours to install, not sure why).


- Can someone please enlighten as to what has happened, did I do something wrong?

- Is there a way to correct this behavior, it doesn't seem like Disk user should be exposed in this way


I can't seem to find consistent answers anywhere else.


Thanks

P

MacBook Pro with Retina display, macOS High Sierra (10.13.1)

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Nov 16, 2017 12:57 PM in response to Peter Loew In response to Peter Loew


- Can someone please enlighten as to what has happened, did I do something wrong?

- Is there a way to correct this behavior, it doesn't seem like Disk user should be exposed in this way

You did nothing wrong if the system drive is an SSD. The only way to correct this is to not encrypt the drive prior to installing the OS. See the last paragraph below. It has nothing to do with APFS format or HFS+ format. I can't explain why you see the Disk User along with User accounts like your screenshot. It may have something to do with formatting your HDD (instead of SSD) drive as APFS. HDDs and Fusion Drives are not currently supported for APFS formatting - only SSDs. If you did this on an HDD, John Galt's advice at the end of his post is what you have to do. Keep your HDD as an HFS+ format.


Anytime you format/encrypt your system drive prior to installing the OS, you will always have the Disk User with a password you set. It's the only way to unlock the system drive after a restart since there were no Users setup prior to encrypting.


If you just format the drive, install the OS, add User accounts and then turn on FileVault to encrypt your drive you will have the opportunity to select the Users you wish to use for unlocking the drive at restart. And there will be no Disk User. When you select one of these Users at the login screen, it will unlock the drive (progress bar will show) and afterwards you will see that User's Desktop.

Question marked as Helpful

Nov 16, 2017 1:32 PM in response to Peter Loew In response to Peter Loew

If as you previously stated this is an SSD drive then you did nothing wrong. APFS is supported on SSDs and HDDs but not Fusion Drives. I would take exception to John Galt's and part of Keg's claims that APFS isn't usable and that you should only use HFS+. I have been using an APFS formatted SSD as my startup drive since the release of High Sierra. As of today, Apple does not recommend using APFS on external HDDs but APFS will work. Just don't use it on Fusion Drives.



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Nov 15, 2017 7:47 PM in response to Peter Loew In response to Peter Loew

Maybe you could open Disk Utility and take some snaps to post so we can see what you see. And just for my clarification your computer uses an SSD, not an HDD?


To Post A Screen Shot


  1. Press Command-Shift-4 which will change the cursor to crosshairs.
  2. Hold down the mouse button and use the crosshairs to select the part of the screen you wish to capture.
  3. Release the mouse button and the image will be saved to your Desktop.
  4. Click on the Camera icon in the toolbar of the forum message editor.
  5. Drag the image onto the Choose File button and click on the Insert button.

Nov 15, 2017 7:47 PM

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Nov 16, 2017 12:57 AM in response to Peter Loew In response to Peter Loew

Hi Kappy, yes it's an SSD. I have attached a picture of the boot screen when the Mac is restarted or switched on. As you can see, the first user (boxed out), is my actual OS / iCloud user, the second is the nefarious "Disk Password" (apologies the title of this post said "Disk User") and the third is the standard Guest Account. I have also attached a screen of Disk Utility if that helps at all.


Thanks for your help


User uploaded fileUser uploaded file

Nov 16, 2017 12:57 AM

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Nov 16, 2017 5:08 AM in response to Peter Loew In response to Peter Loew

The reason for your installation difficulties is almost certainly due to overthinking the installation. No one at Apple expected or would have tested the High Sierra upgrade on anything other than an HFS+ formatted volume, so by prematurely converting it to APFS you only brought misery upon yourself. Instructions to do that do not exist. The HS installer would have detected the presence of a solid state startup drive, and proceeded to converted it to APFS. That's how it's designed to work. Since the conversion was already accomplished no one knows what would have happened.


- Is there a way to correct this behavior, it doesn't seem like Disk user should be exposed in this way


Restore your Mac to a Time Machine or equivalent backup created prior to upgrading, then upgrade in the usual manner.

Nov 16, 2017 5:08 AM

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Question marked as Helpful

Nov 16, 2017 12:57 PM in response to Peter Loew In response to Peter Loew


- Can someone please enlighten as to what has happened, did I do something wrong?

- Is there a way to correct this behavior, it doesn't seem like Disk user should be exposed in this way

You did nothing wrong if the system drive is an SSD. The only way to correct this is to not encrypt the drive prior to installing the OS. See the last paragraph below. It has nothing to do with APFS format or HFS+ format. I can't explain why you see the Disk User along with User accounts like your screenshot. It may have something to do with formatting your HDD (instead of SSD) drive as APFS. HDDs and Fusion Drives are not currently supported for APFS formatting - only SSDs. If you did this on an HDD, John Galt's advice at the end of his post is what you have to do. Keep your HDD as an HFS+ format.


Anytime you format/encrypt your system drive prior to installing the OS, you will always have the Disk User with a password you set. It's the only way to unlock the system drive after a restart since there were no Users setup prior to encrypting.


If you just format the drive, install the OS, add User accounts and then turn on FileVault to encrypt your drive you will have the opportunity to select the Users you wish to use for unlocking the drive at restart. And there will be no Disk User. When you select one of these Users at the login screen, it will unlock the drive (progress bar will show) and afterwards you will see that User's Desktop.

Nov 16, 2017 12:57 PM

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Nov 16, 2017 12:56 PM in response to John Galt In response to John Galt

John, for context I initially upgraded the normal way, via the App Store on both my 12" and this 15" laptop. I chose now to do a clean install due to some other issues I was having that I couldn't resolve.


However, I do not agree with your comment entirely. Apple has released a product with a new file system and has made that file system available as an option from Disk Utility on the boot menu, so they absolutely would have tested it. Even in the official Apple support advice, they are explicit about choosing either HFS+ or APFS (not APFS encrypted, however) when erasing a drive: https://support.apple.com/en-au/HT204904


I take the rest of your advice and I will go through the process again by simply choosing APFS, as directed by the link. I will then proceed to apply File Vault within the OS.


Thanks

Nov 16, 2017 12:56 PM

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Nov 16, 2017 1:02 PM in response to keg55 In response to keg55

Hi Keg, thanks and as per my reply to John, I'll be following these instructions. Just to be clear it's an SSD (Mid 2014 MacBook Pro) and I haven't changed the hardware.


My thinking was that I could avoid the slow drive conversation via FileVault and simply create the disk as APFS Encrypted, as that is an option presented by the system, clearly I was getting ahead of myself.


I'll attempt to post back with the results so others can see this is a method that will work.


Thanks for your help

Nov 16, 2017 1:02 PM

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Nov 16, 2017 1:05 PM in response to Peter Loew In response to Peter Loew

By the way guys, I went through this process of clean install with my 12" MacBook (Early 2016 model), with APFS Encrypted enabled, and I have had no problems with that, it's working perfectly as far as I can tell, and everything seems in order. As far as I know the steps taken were the same. Perhaps it's down to newer hardware?


Thanks

Nov 16, 2017 1:05 PM

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Question marked as Helpful

Nov 16, 2017 1:32 PM in response to Peter Loew In response to Peter Loew

If as you previously stated this is an SSD drive then you did nothing wrong. APFS is supported on SSDs and HDDs but not Fusion Drives. I would take exception to John Galt's and part of Keg's claims that APFS isn't usable and that you should only use HFS+. I have been using an APFS formatted SSD as my startup drive since the release of High Sierra. As of today, Apple does not recommend using APFS on external HDDs but APFS will work. Just don't use it on Fusion Drives.



Nov 16, 2017 1:32 PM

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Nov 16, 2017 1:33 PM in response to Kappy In response to Kappy

Kappy wrote:


If as you previously stated this is an SSD drive then you did nothing wrong. APFS is supported on SSDs and HDDs but not Fusion Drives. I would take exception to John Galt's and part of Keg's claims that APFS isn't usable and that you should only use HFS+. I have been using an APFS formatted SSD as my startup drive since the release of High Sierra. As of today, Apple does not recommend using APFS on external HDDs but APFS will work. Just don't use it on Fusion Drives.



Agreed. I have replied above.


Thanks

Nov 16, 2017 1:33 PM

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Question: "Disk User" Showing up on EFI boot screen after a clean install with APFS Encryption