Announcement: Upgrade to macOS Mojave

With features like Dark Mode, Stacks, and four new built-in apps, macOS Mojave helps you get more out of every click. 
Find out how to upgrade to macOS Mojave > https://support.apple.com/macos/mojave

Looks like no one’s replied in a while. To start the conversation again, simply ask a new question.

Question:

Question: Enabling TRIM much later after purchase

About 22 months ago, I purchased a couple Solid State Drives, one being the Crucial M500 (960gb) and the other being a Samsung 850 EVO (120gb). During this period, the TRIM has never been enabled... so TRIM Support has always been set to NO. Quite honestly, I never though much about enabling it and I'm not experiencing any speed issues.


Having said that, I would like to enable them using "sudo trimforce enable". Will I encounter any problems if they've never been enabled after all this time? I do have both drives backed up so I'm not worried there.


The Samsung holds files (no operating system) but the Crucial is partitioned, running Sierra on one volume and High Sierra on the other volume. Is this a problem?


Any feedback would be appreciated.


Thanks...

Mac Pro, macOS Sierra (10.12.6), High Sierra (10.13.1)

Posted on

Reply
Question marked as Solved
Answer:
Answer:

It should not be a problem enabling TRIM at any time. As I said, it is just a way for the file system to tell the SSD there are additional blocks that can be pre-cleaned for future writes.


When I enabled TRIM for my iMac with a 480GB OWC SSD, I used "sudo trimforce enable"

When I enabled TRIM for my MacBook Pro with 1TB Samsung 840, I used "sudo trimforce enable"


The only TRIM problem I have ever hear of had to do with Linux and using queued TRIM entires. macOS does not use this form of TRIM, and I have not heard of anyone complaining about TRIM doing anything to their 3rd party SSD's.


But having a backup, and keeping it current until you are comfortable, would be a good idea.

Posted on

Question marked as Helpful

Nov 18, 2017 12:19 AM in response to Christoph Landon In response to Christoph Landon

No. TRIM is a way for the file system to report which blocks of a deleted file are available may be cleaned by the SSD.


Without TRIM, any deleted files are just sitting on a file system free list, but to the SSD they still look like they have data in them. Without TRIM, those blocks do not get cleaned until the file system decided to take them off the free list and use them as storage for a new file.


Enabling TRIM now, will just start to give the SSD more blocks to have pre-cleaned so they are ready to be written. Eventually the file system will work it way through its free list and more and more blocks will get pre-cleaned.

Question marked as Helpful

Nov 18, 2017 12:19 AM in response to Christoph Landon In response to Christoph Landon

You need to consult Crucial and Samsung to determine if Apple's TRIM command will not damage your drives.

Apple never enabled it by default because they do not test every SSD. When you use trimforce, you are taking responsibility for ensuring it will not damage your SSD.

There’s more to the conversation

Read all replies

Page content loaded

Question marked as Helpful

Nov 18, 2017 12:19 AM in response to Christoph Landon In response to Christoph Landon

No. TRIM is a way for the file system to report which blocks of a deleted file are available may be cleaned by the SSD.


Without TRIM, any deleted files are just sitting on a file system free list, but to the SSD they still look like they have data in them. Without TRIM, those blocks do not get cleaned until the file system decided to take them off the free list and use them as storage for a new file.


Enabling TRIM now, will just start to give the SSD more blocks to have pre-cleaned so they are ready to be written. Eventually the file system will work it way through its free list and more and more blocks will get pre-cleaned.

Nov 18, 2017 12:19 AM

Reply Helpful (1)

Nov 17, 2017 12:24 PM in response to BobHarris In response to BobHarris

Thanks for the feedback, Bob. I really appreciate it. I'm assuming you saying "No", is responding to both of my questions, correct? I just need to make sure I won't encounter any issues, late in the game.


Would you recommend using either app, Trim Enabler or Disk Sensei or am I good to go with "sudo trimforce enable"?

Nov 17, 2017 12:24 PM

Reply Helpful
Question marked as Helpful

Nov 18, 2017 12:19 AM in response to Christoph Landon In response to Christoph Landon

You need to consult Crucial and Samsung to determine if Apple's TRIM command will not damage your drives.

Apple never enabled it by default because they do not test every SSD. When you use trimforce, you are taking responsibility for ensuring it will not damage your SSD.

Nov 18, 2017 12:19 AM

Reply Helpful (1)
Question marked as Solved

Nov 17, 2017 9:06 PM in response to Christoph Landon In response to Christoph Landon

It should not be a problem enabling TRIM at any time. As I said, it is just a way for the file system to tell the SSD there are additional blocks that can be pre-cleaned for future writes.


When I enabled TRIM for my iMac with a 480GB OWC SSD, I used "sudo trimforce enable"

When I enabled TRIM for my MacBook Pro with 1TB Samsung 840, I used "sudo trimforce enable"


The only TRIM problem I have ever hear of had to do with Linux and using queued TRIM entires. macOS does not use this form of TRIM, and I have not heard of anyone complaining about TRIM doing anything to their 3rd party SSD's.


But having a backup, and keeping it current until you are comfortable, would be a good idea.

Nov 17, 2017 9:06 PM

Reply Helpful

Nov 17, 2017 9:33 PM in response to Christoph Landon In response to Christoph Landon

There have been reports here of enabling TRIM on third party Drives causing a unexpected delay in the boot up process on otherwise fast SSD boot times. Once the machine is booted—no further issues reported.


The only problems I have encountered is running TRIM on a OWC SSD, disabling it (to test the boot delay issue resolves it self) , and re-enabling for a short period to test the boot delay, and subsequently disabling it again This seem to mess with files not opening, wrong files opening, all App icons on the Dock disappearing to ? marks, Apps no longer launching. A real mess.


As stated above—always have a a current back up plan in place. How to create a boot clone

Nov 17, 2017 9:33 PM

Reply Helpful
User profile for user: Christoph Landon

Question: Enabling TRIM much later after purchase