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Question: High Sierra-Lost Permissions-Boot HD

Just updated my MBPro to High Sierra 10.13.2.


Kept having to enter my password when opening programs/documents/apps


Checked 'Get Info' for the HD & noted I was not listed under Sharing & Permissions --> "You can only read" was noted


Unlocked the window - Clicked on the + Sign - my name was listed - clicked on it & was met with the following:

User uploaded file


Checked Sys Pref --> Users & Groups & confirmed that I was the Current User (Admin)

Did a Safe Reboot followed by a Restart

Problem remains.


Appreciate any advice!

MacBook Pro, macOS High Sierra (10.13.1)

Posted on

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Question marked as Solved
Answer:
Answer:

Problem Resolved:


Booted from 2nd Drive --> Get Info SSD --> Unlocked Padlock -->Clicked on + sign --> Clicked on Administrators

Admin was added to List under Name --> Changed to Read & Write --> Repeated to add my Admin Account Name (JMBonn) --> Read & Write


Restarted from original boot drive


Now able to move/rename all files.


Here is what the Get Info window now looks like:

User uploaded file

Bottom Line: Unable to change permissions while the SSD was the boot drive but no problem once another HD was used to boot!

Posted on

Dec 12, 2017 7:53 PM in response to John Bonn In response to John Bonn

Permissions for your SSD are proper and you should not attempt to change them. See the following:


Possible Fixes for El Capitan or Later

You should try each, one at a time, then test to see if the problem is fixed before going on to the next.


Be sure to backup your files before proceeding if possible.


  1. Shutdown the computer, wait 30 seconds, restart the computer.
  2. Resetting your Mac’s PRAM and NVRAM
  3. Reset the System Management Controller (SMC)
  4. Start the computer in Safe Mode, then restart normally. This is slower than a standard startup.
  5. Repair the disk by booting from the Recovery HD. Immediately after the chime hold down the Command and R keys until the Utility Menu appears. Choose Disk Utility and click on the Continue button. Select the indented (usually, Macintosh HD) volume entry from the side list. Click on the First Aid button in the toolbar. Wait for the Done button to appear. Quit Disk Utility and return to the Utility Menu. Restart the computer from the Apple Menu.
  6. Create a New User Account Open Users & Groups preferences. Click on the lock icon and enter your Admin password when prompted. On the left under Current User click on the Add [+] button under Login Options. Setup a new Admin user account. Upon completion log out of your current account then log into the new account. If your problems cease, then consider switching to the new account and transferring your files to it - Transferring files from one User Account to another.
  7. Download and install theOS X El Capitan 10.11.6 ComboUpdate or 10.12.6 Combo Update or macOS High Sierra 10.13.2 Combo Update as needed.
  8. Reinstall OS X by booting from the Recovery HD using the Command and R keys. When the Utility Menu appears select Reinstall OS X then click on the Continue button.
  9. Erase and Install OS X Restart the computer. Immediately after the chime hold down the CommandandRkeys until the Apple logo appears. When the Utility Menu appears:
  1. Select Disk Utility from the Utility Menu and click on Continue button.
  2. When Disk Utility loads select the drive (out-dented entry) from the Device list.
  3. Click on the Erase icon in Disk Utility's toolbar. A panel will drop down.
  4. Set the Format type to Mac OS Extended (Journaled.)
  5. Click on the Apply button, then wait for the Done button to activate and click on it.
  6. Quit Disk Utility and return to the Utility Menu.
  7. Select Reinstall OS X and click on the Continue button.


Dec 12, 2017 7:53 PM

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Dec 12, 2017 8:08 PM in response to Kappy In response to Kappy

Kappy..


Appreciate the comprehensive reply.


Do not understand your statement:


Permissions for your SSD are proper and you should not attempt to change them.


With these settings, I am required to enter my Admin Password whenever I open a file/app.


Don't think that's the way the system is meant to work.

Dec 12, 2017 8:08 PM

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Dec 12, 2017 8:08 PM in response to John Bonn In response to John Bonn

In High Sierra, only root has unfettered access to the root of the hard drive. You cannot give yourself permission. Just because the root of the hard drive is protected doesn't mean you do not have permission to subfolders. So, the issue with the permissions on the root of the hard drive are not the issue with your other problems.


Not being able to open applications is odd.

Permissions outside of the Home folder can be repaired during installation, so reinstalling may be the only way to fix the issues.


Having issues with things in your home folder is separate issue. You can repair those following this: Resolve issues caused by changing the permissions of items in your home folder - Apple Support

Dec 12, 2017 8:08 PM

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Dec 13, 2017 6:54 AM in response to Barney-15E In response to Barney-15E

Update: Talked with Apple Support.

They were able to reproduce the problem on their MBP & agree that something is wrong - should not have to enter Admin Password whenever moving/renaming a file

They have passed it on to their Engineering Dep't & will get back to me.

Will post any result.


No similar problem with my Mac Pro Boot Drive - able to read & write.

Both the MBP & MacPro boot drives are SSDs with APFS formatting

Note the difference in Sharing & Permissions:

Mac Pro (Main SSD) - You have custom access

MBPro SSD - You can only read


User uploaded file

Dec 13, 2017 6:54 AM

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Dec 13, 2017 8:15 PM in response to Barney-15E In response to Barney-15E

Sorry I am not making this clear.


There is no problem with the Main SSD on my Mac Pro permissions - I can read & write.


But on my MacBook Pro SSD - I can only read.


I added screenshots to demonstrate the difference.


I am unable to rename or move any file on the MacBook Pro without entering my Administrator Password.


Not a serious problem but quite inconvenient & not what Apple designed I'm sure.

Dec 13, 2017 8:15 PM

Reply Helpful (1)

Dec 14, 2017 3:40 AM in response to John Bonn In response to John Bonn

There is no problem with the Main SSD on my Mac Pro permissions - I can read & write.

What I was trying to explain was that the permissions on your Main SSD are wrong. They were carried over from what you had before the upgrade.

Normal permissions for any hard drive in High Sierra is System (root) read & write, Wheel group read only, and everyone (others) read only. SIP prevents anyone from changing those permissions. The only user that can write to the root of the hard drive is root. But, even root cannot change the permissions.

I have no idea if this was intended. Seems to be a rational security measure and they haven't altered it in three versions of the OS, now.


If you want to change you other drive's permissions, you'll have to disable SIP, change the permissions, and re-enable SIP.

Dec 14, 2017 3:40 AM

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Dec 14, 2017 4:38 AM in response to Barney-15E In response to Barney-15E

Thank you.


If I understand this, I disable SIP (Terminal command csrutil enable --without fs ), change my SSD's permissions which will allow me to move/rename files on that drive without being required to enter my Administrator's password & then re-enable SIP.


What is the Terminal Command for re-enabling SIP after I am done?


Hope I've got this right (I can be a little thick about these issues!)

Dec 14, 2017 4:38 AM

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Question marked as Solved

Dec 14, 2017 6:54 AM in response to John Bonn In response to John Bonn

Problem Resolved:


Booted from 2nd Drive --> Get Info SSD --> Unlocked Padlock -->Clicked on + sign --> Clicked on Administrators

Admin was added to List under Name --> Changed to Read & Write --> Repeated to add my Admin Account Name (JMBonn) --> Read & Write


Restarted from original boot drive


Now able to move/rename all files.


Here is what the Get Info window now looks like:

User uploaded file

Bottom Line: Unable to change permissions while the SSD was the boot drive but no problem once another HD was used to boot!

Dec 14, 2017 6:54 AM

Reply Helpful (1)

Dec 17, 2017 9:25 PM in response to Barney-15E In response to Barney-15E

I have the same problem but can't boot from another volume with my MacBook Air since I have only a USB means of connection in my remote location, and it fails to boot that way (even though System preferences / Startup Disk suggests it can by accepting selection of the volume).


"You had the command to turn it on. Use disable to turn it off.": I have no clue what you mean by that - it's much too cryptic to be discernible. Please elaborate with sufficient detail to follow...


In the meantime why does Apple saddle us with so many significant problems with most upgrades in this era? Boot permission corruption isn't the only one this time - all my folders lost their location and size information too, so every last one of them had to be reconfigured from scratch, a massive waste of time. Users don't have time to repair extensive damage from abject software design thoughtlessness...


The Mac OS was a far more user friendly environment in earlier times...

Dec 17, 2017 9:25 PM

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User profile for user: John Bonn

Question: High Sierra-Lost Permissions-Boot HD