Looks like no one’s replied in a while. To start the conversation again, simply ask a new question.

Question:

Question: Network issues

Pardon the lengthy question, but this issue is driving me nuts. I have a Time Capsule hosting our home network connected by Ethernet to a wireless modem supplied by our ISP providing 25down 2up bonded internet service (note, this issue existed with a standard modem when we had 15 over 1). We have a second Time Capsule (to extend the network), half dozen iPhones, iPads, and MacBooks connected to this WiFi network, but rarely more than one device, or two at most using the network at any given time. About once a day, most days, for an hour or less, the activity LED's on the ISP's supplied modem will show a high level of activity, yet we are not personally engaged in using any device. Indeed, when we attempt to access the internet with any device we find no available bandwidth, and I mean none. It is though something on our network is absorbing all available bandwidth. Now, if I disconnect the Ethernet connected Time Capsule that normally hosts our network and connect a device directly to the ISP's modem by WiFi then we have full bandwidth and internet connectivity back again. How could any device on our normal Time Capsule network take ALL available bandwidth? As best I can tell, none of the devices attached to our network is active when this happens, and I do not have any large files (such as photos) set to automatically back up to iCloud or the like. Even were I to have two MacBooks streaming HD video simultaneously could I deliberately replicate a situation where ALL our bandwidth was being consumed. We live in a very rural area with no close neighbors, so no chance at all that an outside source could be poaching our WiFi. I'm baffled. Could the Time Capsule (gen. 1) Ethernet connected to the ISP somehow be the issue?

Posted on

Reply
Question marked as Solved
Answer:
Answer:

To add a bit to Bob's comments on mesh networks, I put together a list that may prove helpful in your decision. Note: In the list, manufacturers' products are listed in alphabetical order, not by performance.


Wireless Data Throughput Performance "Best-to-Worst"

  1. A wireless network that uses an Ethernet backbone.
    • This type of network requires Ethernet connectivity for each of the Wireless Access Points (WAP).

    • A roaming network consisting of Apple and/or non-Apple WAPs.

    • Types of networking hardware configurations:

    • All Apple base stations in a roaming network configuration.

    • All non-Apple WAPs in a roaming network configuration.

    • examples:

      • Cisco Aeronet

      • Ubiquiti Uni-Fi

      • A combination of Apple and non-Apple WAPs.

    • Alternatively, you could substitute Powerline adapters to create pseudo Ethernet connections using your home's electrical circuit.

  2. A wireless network that uses a dedicated wireless backhaul.

    • This type of network does NOT require Ethernet connectivity.

    • This is one type of a "mesh" network that utilizes a dedicated wireless radio to maintain the extended network.

    • Examples:

      • Asus HiveSpot

      • Linksys Velop

      • Netgear Orbi

  3. A wireless network that does not use a dedicated wireless backhaul.

    • This type of network does NOT require Ethernet connectivity.

    • This is the other type of "mesh" network. It does not utilize a dedicated wireless radio to maintain the extended network.

    • Examples:

      • Amazon Luma

      • Asus HiveDot

      • Eero

      • Google WiFi

      • Plume Adaptive WiFi

      • Securifi Almond

      • Ubiquiti AmpliFi HD

  4. A wireless network that utilize repeaters.

    • This type of network does NOT require Ethernet connectivity.

    • Types of hardware configurations:

    • An extended network consisting of all Apple base stations.

    • An extended network consisting of all non-Apple wireless routers and extenders.

Posted on

Question marked as Helpful

Dec 17, 2017 10:12 AM in response to mpercy In response to mpercy

Could the Time Capsule (gen. 1) Ethernet connected to the ISP somehow be the issue?

The fact that you still have an "operational" 1st generation 802.11n Time Capsule (TC) is a rarity in itself. Most of these had power-supply issues and failed earlier in their lifespans. I would venture to say that this TC is starting to fail. Is the extending TC a 1st gen as well? Regardless, you may want to temporarily substitute it for the "main" one to verify if the main one is faulty or not.

Question marked as Helpful

Dec 17, 2017 10:12 AM in response to mpercy In response to mpercy

Could the Time Capsule (gen. 1) Ethernet connected to the ISP somehow be the issue?

Yes it could. Honestly, it is nothing short of a miracle that a Gen 1 Time Capsule will even power up at all, much less operate correctly.


The product is at least 9+ years old, and likely older depending on when it was placed into service. Most of these devices failed before 3 years of use and very few made it to 5 years.....which is the normal average useful life of a router designed for home use.


You don't indicate how old the second Time Capsule might be, but if it seems to be operating normally, and you have the time, remove the 1st Gen Time Capsule from the network and replace it with the other Time Capsule. You won't have an extended network this way, but if the Time Capsule works OK, you can add a new AirPort to extend the network, or another Time Capsule if you need the additional data storage.

There’s more to the conversation

Read all replies
Question marked as Helpful

Dec 17, 2017 10:12 AM in response to mpercy In response to mpercy

Could the Time Capsule (gen. 1) Ethernet connected to the ISP somehow be the issue?

The fact that you still have an "operational" 1st generation 802.11n Time Capsule (TC) is a rarity in itself. Most of these had power-supply issues and failed earlier in their lifespans. I would venture to say that this TC is starting to fail. Is the extending TC a 1st gen as well? Regardless, you may want to temporarily substitute it for the "main" one to verify if the main one is faulty or not.

Dec 17, 2017 10:12 AM

Reply Helpful (1)
Question marked as Helpful

Dec 17, 2017 10:12 AM in response to mpercy In response to mpercy

Could the Time Capsule (gen. 1) Ethernet connected to the ISP somehow be the issue?

Yes it could. Honestly, it is nothing short of a miracle that a Gen 1 Time Capsule will even power up at all, much less operate correctly.


The product is at least 9+ years old, and likely older depending on when it was placed into service. Most of these devices failed before 3 years of use and very few made it to 5 years.....which is the normal average useful life of a router designed for home use.


You don't indicate how old the second Time Capsule might be, but if it seems to be operating normally, and you have the time, remove the 1st Gen Time Capsule from the network and replace it with the other Time Capsule. You won't have an extended network this way, but if the Time Capsule works OK, you can add a new AirPort to extend the network, or another Time Capsule if you need the additional data storage.

Dec 17, 2017 10:12 AM

Reply Helpful (1)

Dec 17, 2017 10:08 AM in response to Bob Timmons In response to Bob Timmons

Thanks, perhaps time to replace this one (or both - other is gen. 2). I just hate to throw stuff away that still works, and until recently this worked fine. Apple did replace this one under warranty some years ago. Perhaps this is an opportunity to create a mesh network as my various devices are scattered over three floors and also to my office above a detached garage. I could use more even coverage. Now about that G4 I just retired after a new/used power supply and logic board failed to fix....................

Dec 17, 2017 10:08 AM

Reply Helpful

Dec 17, 2017 10:25 AM in response to mpercy In response to mpercy

Like it or not, products designed for home use will on average, fail or at least start to decline significantly at about 5 years. The 1st Gen Time Capsule had major power supply design problems, and the 2nd Gen was not much better. If your replacement devices from Apple have worked to this point, pat yourself on the back for your very good luck.


There's no harm in continuing to use the 2nd Gen Time Capsule as long as you understand that it may fail at any minute, so if the data on the device is important to you, it might be a good idea to copy or Archive that data to a USB hard drive.


As far as mesh, I have tried a few of the popular "name brand" systems, but the results were disappointing. I think you will likely need to look at a professional mesh system or semi-pro if you are interested in good performance. That's the way I'm heading early next year.

Dec 17, 2017 10:25 AM

Reply Helpful
Question marked as Solved

Dec 17, 2017 10:40 AM in response to mpercy In response to mpercy

To add a bit to Bob's comments on mesh networks, I put together a list that may prove helpful in your decision. Note: In the list, manufacturers' products are listed in alphabetical order, not by performance.


Wireless Data Throughput Performance "Best-to-Worst"

  1. A wireless network that uses an Ethernet backbone.
    • This type of network requires Ethernet connectivity for each of the Wireless Access Points (WAP).

    • A roaming network consisting of Apple and/or non-Apple WAPs.

    • Types of networking hardware configurations:

    • All Apple base stations in a roaming network configuration.

    • All non-Apple WAPs in a roaming network configuration.

    • examples:

      • Cisco Aeronet

      • Ubiquiti Uni-Fi

      • A combination of Apple and non-Apple WAPs.

    • Alternatively, you could substitute Powerline adapters to create pseudo Ethernet connections using your home's electrical circuit.

  2. A wireless network that uses a dedicated wireless backhaul.

    • This type of network does NOT require Ethernet connectivity.

    • This is one type of a "mesh" network that utilizes a dedicated wireless radio to maintain the extended network.

    • Examples:

      • Asus HiveSpot

      • Linksys Velop

      • Netgear Orbi

  3. A wireless network that does not use a dedicated wireless backhaul.

    • This type of network does NOT require Ethernet connectivity.

    • This is the other type of "mesh" network. It does not utilize a dedicated wireless radio to maintain the extended network.

    • Examples:

      • Amazon Luma

      • Asus HiveDot

      • Eero

      • Google WiFi

      • Plume Adaptive WiFi

      • Securifi Almond

      • Ubiquiti AmpliFi HD

  4. A wireless network that utilize repeaters.

    • This type of network does NOT require Ethernet connectivity.

    • Types of hardware configurations:

    • An extended network consisting of all Apple base stations.

    • An extended network consisting of all non-Apple wireless routers and extenders.

Dec 17, 2017 10:40 AM

Reply Helpful
User profile for user: mpercy

Question: Network issues