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Question: New SSD and APFS

I recently replaced the HDD in my 2010 MacBook Pro with a new SSD. I also have an external HDD for Time Machine backups. I was already running High Sierra and I did the following:


1) After installing the new SSD I booted into macOS Recovery (by holding Command-R) and opened Disk Utility.

2) There, I formatted the new SSD as APFS.

3) I then went back to macOS Recovery and selected "Restore From Time Machine Backup" and restored from my most recent backup on the external HDD.

4) After that finished and booted into High Sierra, the system reported that my file system for the SSD is Mac OS Extended (Journaled).


So my question is, why did it change from APFS to Mac OS Extended (Journaled)? Is it because my Time Machine backup used Mac OS Extended (Journaled) and it automatically converted it when the "Restore From Time Machine Backup" option was used?

MacBook Pro, macOS High Sierra (10.13.3)

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The answer to your question is "because that's what Time Machine does."


It's normal. You can convert it to APFS using Disk Utility. Beware that doing so might result in macOS updates or future upgrades not working. Apple has zero interest in supporting SSDs that they do not incorporate themselves in the products they build.

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Mar 1, 2018 6:40 AM in response to Yamar In response to Yamar

John Galt is correct.


However, the format is when a Time Machine back up is done is what the Restore System will format to.


So, instead of doing a Restore System from Time Machine back up you will need to actually install High Sierra. The install should automatically format the SSD to APFS. Then during Setup you can Migrate all your user accounts, data, settings, etc from your Time Machine back up. This will not reformat the SSD.


When you do your first and subsequent Time Machine back up from your new SSD that is formatted APFS, any Restore System using that back up, will format the drive to APFS regardless how it was formatted before the restore.

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Feb 28, 2018 9:51 AM in response to Yamar In response to Yamar

The answer to your question is "because that's what Time Machine does."


It's normal. You can convert it to APFS using Disk Utility. Beware that doing so might result in macOS updates or future upgrades not working. Apple has zero interest in supporting SSDs that they do not incorporate themselves in the products they build.

Feb 28, 2018 9:51 AM

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Question marked as Helpful

Mar 1, 2018 6:40 AM in response to Yamar In response to Yamar

John Galt is correct.


However, the format is when a Time Machine back up is done is what the Restore System will format to.


So, instead of doing a Restore System from Time Machine back up you will need to actually install High Sierra. The install should automatically format the SSD to APFS. Then during Setup you can Migrate all your user accounts, data, settings, etc from your Time Machine back up. This will not reformat the SSD.


When you do your first and subsequent Time Machine back up from your new SSD that is formatted APFS, any Restore System using that back up, will format the drive to APFS regardless how it was formatted before the restore.

Mar 1, 2018 6:40 AM

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Question: New SSD and APFS