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Question: Can I burn a CD with a Quicktime recording

Can I burn a CD with a Quicktime recording? Do I need a special CD like a music or DVD to create a Cd that can then be played on another computer?

iMac, OS X Yosemite (10.10.2)

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Mar 1, 2018 5:25 PM in response to rjmman1 In response to rjmman1

Hello rjmman1,


Thanks for that info and choosing the Apple Support Communities. It sounds like you want to be able to take a recording you have in QuickTime on your iMac and burn it to a CD. The good news is you can do this by sending the file from QuickTime to iTunes and burning the CD in iTunes. Here are some resources to help with this process.


Share your movies on iTunes - QuickTime Player Help

Create your own CDs and DVDs - iTunes Help


Cheers!

Question marked as Helpful

Mar 1, 2018 5:25 PM in response to rjmman1 In response to rjmman1

Can I burn a CD with a Quicktime recording?

The short answer is yes. Unfortunately, your lack of amplifying information makes it difficult to describe any specific workflow here.


Do I need a special CD like a music or DVD to create a Cd that can then be played on another computer?

A "special" form of optical media is not required as long as the media disc is of reasonably good quality and has the capacity required for the file(s) you wish to store. CDs are normally limited to 650-700 MBs of storage while DVDs have a capacity of 4.2 GBs (single layer) to almost 9 GBs (dual layer) with BDs topping out at 25 GBs (single layer) or 50 GBs (dual layer). Therefore, the first question is "How much space do you need to store your files?" This usually depends on the quality settings used to encode your files, the resolution at which the files are stored, and the length of your videos. In turn, your encode settings depend on whether you are creating a data disc or authoring discs that are playback compatible with commercial disc players, a computer, or both and whether or not the video is being played directly from the disc or is to be copied from the disc to the second computer's hard drive for playback. In short, there are numerous workflows here which depend on how the media is to be played which, in turn, determine the specific type of software required for creating/burning the media to optical media in the first place.


How much of this information have you determined at this point?

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Question marked as Helpful

Mar 1, 2018 5:25 PM in response to rjmman1 In response to rjmman1

Hello rjmman1,


Thanks for that info and choosing the Apple Support Communities. It sounds like you want to be able to take a recording you have in QuickTime on your iMac and burn it to a CD. The good news is you can do this by sending the file from QuickTime to iTunes and burning the CD in iTunes. Here are some resources to help with this process.


Share your movies on iTunes - QuickTime Player Help

Create your own CDs and DVDs - iTunes Help


Cheers!

Mar 1, 2018 5:25 PM

Reply Helpful (1)
Question marked as Helpful

Mar 1, 2018 5:25 PM in response to rjmman1 In response to rjmman1

Can I burn a CD with a Quicktime recording?

The short answer is yes. Unfortunately, your lack of amplifying information makes it difficult to describe any specific workflow here.


Do I need a special CD like a music or DVD to create a Cd that can then be played on another computer?

A "special" form of optical media is not required as long as the media disc is of reasonably good quality and has the capacity required for the file(s) you wish to store. CDs are normally limited to 650-700 MBs of storage while DVDs have a capacity of 4.2 GBs (single layer) to almost 9 GBs (dual layer) with BDs topping out at 25 GBs (single layer) or 50 GBs (dual layer). Therefore, the first question is "How much space do you need to store your files?" This usually depends on the quality settings used to encode your files, the resolution at which the files are stored, and the length of your videos. In turn, your encode settings depend on whether you are creating a data disc or authoring discs that are playback compatible with commercial disc players, a computer, or both and whether or not the video is being played directly from the disc or is to be copied from the disc to the second computer's hard drive for playback. In short, there are numerous workflows here which depend on how the media is to be played which, in turn, determine the specific type of software required for creating/burning the media to optical media in the first place.


How much of this information have you determined at this point?

User uploaded file

Mar 1, 2018 5:25 PM

Reply Helpful (1)
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Question: Can I burn a CD with a Quicktime recording