Looks like no one’s replied in a while. To start the conversation again, simply ask a new question.

Question:

Question: Vintage and Obsolete iMac

Hi,

I have an iMac mid-2011 27" and I see the article below which says that iMacs mid 2011 21.5 inches are obsoletes.

Does anybody have an idea ( or experience ), till when my machine will still be supported ?

My iMac has these specs :


- 3.4 GHz CPU

- 16GB RAM

- 2 GB GPU

- 2 HDDs ( 1 SSD + 1 simple HDD ) 1,256 GB Total Capacity


Vintage and obsolete products - Apple Support


Thanks

iMac, macOS High Sierra (10.13)

Posted on

Reply
Question marked as Solved
Answer:
Answer:

You're welcome.

Maybe High Sierra cannot run in 2007-2009 Mac, so my time is coming at the next OS releases.

As I mentioned, there's no telling. As long as your hardware supports the OS, you're fine. If Apple makes some change to the OS at some point your hardware no longer supports, then you'll know. 😎


To quote moi, "there's no telling".

Posted on

Question marked as Helpful

Mar 1, 2018 11:06 PM in response to GPap1981 In response to GPap1981

Those guidelines refer to what hardware Apple will support, like for spare parts, etc. You might still be able to service the computer from third-party sources. For example, the G4s have been vintage/obsolete per Apple, but you can still find rebuilt Power Supplies on eBay. So, you might still be able to get some hardware upgrades and replacement parts, just not from Apple, but as time goes on this can be more difficult.


Another thing to consider is the support for security updates to Mac OS X/macOS, historically, Apple has generally provided updates to the latest operating system, and the 2 prior releases. So, even if your machine can not run the latest release, you might still be able to get security updates for the prior OS release, but just because they have done this in the past is no guarantee they will follow this in the future.


https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201222

In Jan 2018 an update was released for High Sierra, Sierra, and El Capitan. Potentially, when the next macOS release comes out, El Capitan support could be dropped. When a known security flaw is discovered, running the older OS with that flaw becomes a risk. Just something to consider.

There’s more to the conversation

Read all replies

Mar 1, 2018 6:39 AM in response to CountryGirl56 In response to CountryGirl56

Thank you,

I thought obsolete iMacs and iMacs with non-supported OS was the same thing 🙂

However, because I'm new to Apple world, I would like to know how many years the macOS lasts approximately.

Maybe High Sierra cannot run in 2007-2009 Mac, so my time is coming at the next OS releases.

Mar 1, 2018 6:39 AM

Reply Helpful
Question marked as Solved

Mar 1, 2018 6:47 AM in response to GPap1981 In response to GPap1981

You're welcome.

Maybe High Sierra cannot run in 2007-2009 Mac, so my time is coming at the next OS releases.

As I mentioned, there's no telling. As long as your hardware supports the OS, you're fine. If Apple makes some change to the OS at some point your hardware no longer supports, then you'll know. 😎


To quote moi, "there's no telling".

Mar 1, 2018 6:47 AM

Reply Helpful
Question marked as Helpful

Mar 1, 2018 11:06 PM in response to GPap1981 In response to GPap1981

Those guidelines refer to what hardware Apple will support, like for spare parts, etc. You might still be able to service the computer from third-party sources. For example, the G4s have been vintage/obsolete per Apple, but you can still find rebuilt Power Supplies on eBay. So, you might still be able to get some hardware upgrades and replacement parts, just not from Apple, but as time goes on this can be more difficult.


Another thing to consider is the support for security updates to Mac OS X/macOS, historically, Apple has generally provided updates to the latest operating system, and the 2 prior releases. So, even if your machine can not run the latest release, you might still be able to get security updates for the prior OS release, but just because they have done this in the past is no guarantee they will follow this in the future.


https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201222

In Jan 2018 an update was released for High Sierra, Sierra, and El Capitan. Potentially, when the next macOS release comes out, El Capitan support could be dropped. When a known security flaw is discovered, running the older OS with that flaw becomes a risk. Just something to consider.

Mar 1, 2018 11:06 PM

Reply Helpful (1)
User profile for user: GPap1981

Question: Vintage and Obsolete iMac