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Question: How to Handle a Really Negative Experience in Apple Store

Recently I had my roommate take my iPhone 6 S Plus to the local Apple Store for my pre-arranged drop off of the phone to get a new battery. I had attempted to contact this store by phone twice to tell them I was having problems getting a ride to the mall to drop the phone off. However the phone rang and rang and no one ever answered so I contacted support. I told support about my issue and they offered to 'make notes' on my account that the store would see. They said they could not contact the store by phone directly. This is a a major issue to me that this store is so very difficult to get in touch with. Support assured me it would be o.k. I even went so far as to reveal that I am blind/low vision and I was reliant on others to help me with the drop off of the phone and I said that in all likelihood, I would not be the person dropping off the phone. My roommate took the phone in for me two days ago. I was left at home with no phone. I did, however, provide my California i.d. and a hand written note with all pertinent information and reiterating that it was o.k. for Apple employees to work with my roommate in regards to the changing of the battery. My roommate called my neighbor due to issues he was experiencing with the Apple Store employees. My neighbor brought her telephone to me and I spoke with the Apple Employee who wanted my Apple I.D. (which I had already provided in note I sent along with my phone)and password which I provided to him. He said "Great! That does it. I'm in now. To make a very long story short, when my roommate went back into the store to pick it up he was treated horribly. They left him waiting for a long time and did not really want to release the phone to him. I will not go into the extremely rude questions. What I will say is they hard shocked my phone and they did not have my permission to do that. They should not have assumed that I had everything backed up because I did not. I've lost over $75 worth of itune music, etc.applications. I've lost pictures and documents. If Apple Staff was having a problem with my phone they should have sent it back with my roommate and told him that I must come into the store myself. They did not tell my roommate they shocked the phone and I was never told anything about prepping my phone or backing it up just to change a battery. No one gave me any instructions and I have not read anything about the Apple Staff having to hard shock phones to change the battery. I want to report this issue and of course there is no place on the entire website to do this. I don't want to chat. I want to write it so that there will be no question about what I've said. I am furious about this and I would really appreciate someone telling me the address and better yet, a contact person and address so that I can report this happening. In addition, I would really appreciate not hearing comments about how I should have had my phone backed up. The point here is, they violated me by removing lots of things from my phone when all they had to do was to send it back home to me saying they needed to speak with me before installing the battery. If anyone can provide the address, name, etc. of Apple's Dept. that handles issues similar to mine, I would greatly appreciate it.

iPhone 6s Plus, iOS 11.2.1

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Mar 9, 2018 10:09 AM in response to verve57 In response to verve57

"Hard shocked"? What is that?


As for missing purchases: Redownload apps, music, movies, TV shows, and books from the iTunes Store, iBooks Store, and App Store - https://support.apple.com/HT201272


I can't find it with a quick search but I am sure I have seen things in Apple's documentation saying to make sure you have backed up hardware before submitting for service. It is something you should do even if they don't say it. Who knows, if somebody damages a phone accidentally or discovers damage covered by warranty they may have to replace the entire unit with a refurbished unit. I don't think they do that normally for battery or screen repair but it is standard practice for other repairs.


There's a remote possibility you have an iCloud backup if you set it up beforehand. I don't think the person in the shop would do it without your authorization even though it is very simple.

Mar 9, 2018 10:09 AM

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Mar 9, 2018 10:29 AM in response to verve57 In response to verve57

Apple is not responsible for your data for any device you bring in for any service - Apple Inc. Repair Terms & Conditions (See the second paragraph in the terms of service).


No consumer electronics service or repair company I’ve ever heard of or dealt with assumes any responsibility for a users data.

Mar 9, 2018 10:29 AM

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Mar 9, 2018 11:26 AM in response to Limnos In response to Limnos

Limnos wrote:


I can't find it with a quick search but I am sure I have seen things in Apple's documentation saying to make sure you have backed up hardware before submitting for service. It is something you should do even if they don't say it. Who knows, if somebody damages a phone accidentally or discovers damage covered by warranty they may have to replace the entire unit with a refurbished unit. I don't think they do that normally for battery or screen repair but it is standard practice for other repairs.

If you make an appointment online, they give you a checklist of things to do before hand, including backing up your device. When I took my MBP into be repaired two weeks ago (after having seen the checklist), the Genius checked the Time Machine back up status and, until I confirmed that I wasn't using Time Machine and that I had my files back up to my satisfaction, wouldn't even move ahead with the process. I believe I also had to sign off that I understood that my data was my responsibility. That has been the case every time I've ever taken something to Apple for repair.

Mar 9, 2018 11:26 AM

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Mar 9, 2018 11:32 AM in response to verve57 In response to verve57

verve57 wrote:


I was never told anything about prepping my phone or backing it up just to change a battery. No one gave me any instructions and I have not read anything about the Apple Staff having to hard shock phones to change the battery.

Like the others, I've no idea what you mean by "hard shocked". What I do know is that you should always, always, always have a back up of your device. You shouldn't be waiting for someone to tell you to do it before taking it in for repairs. It should be something you do every day. If you wait until you think you may have a problem, it's usually going to be too late.


Apple makes it possible for you to set up your phone to automatically back up every night with no intervention from you other than to plug it in and lock the screen.


How to back up your iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch - Apple Support

Mar 9, 2018 11:32 AM

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Mar 9, 2018 11:36 AM in response to Limnos In response to Limnos

Limnos wrote:


Good information. I haven't seen that but I have never owned anything young enough that Apple would even be prepared to consider any kind of repair! 😁

I had a defective screen on my MBP. It was just under a year old. Other than a hard drive that went wonky out of warranty, this is the first time I've ever had to have a Mac repaired. The whole experience couldn't have been more pleasant. And, even when I've had things repaired (an iPad I dropped, damaging the cellular antenna) out of warranty, it's been the same.

Mar 9, 2018 11:36 AM

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Mar 9, 2018 12:19 PM in response to IdrisSeabright In response to IdrisSeabright

If you look at repair/service terms at Dell.com, Sony.com, Toshiba.com, Samsung.com, etc every single one will have a statement that they assume no responsibility for users data or for data loss occurring in the course of any repair or service. Nobody does that, nor ever has in the age of consumer electronics with mass onboard storage.


There is ever only one person responsible for data, and that is the person who‘s data it is.

Mar 9, 2018 12:19 PM

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Mar 9, 2018 3:18 PM in response to verve57 In response to verve57

"Shocking the phone" is a new one to me.


Guess what, you should've backed up your phone. Everyone's post above mine says this. You're going to keep on hearing this. When I purchased an 8 Plus, Apple Canada asked me for my Apple ID for their records. The next question: "Did you back up your phone before coming here?" I told them I backed it up 30 minutes ago. And by the way that phone was a 6S Plus that I still have.


I don't find that they "violated" you. Plenty of other things out there that can "violate" you and a phone is NOT one of them.


Your data and the responsibility to back it up are yours. Next time, go yourself.

Mar 9, 2018 3:18 PM

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Mar 9, 2018 6:42 PM in response to verve57 In response to verve57

First, let me acknowledge that I can see the confusion, emotions involved, and more. Having gone through repairs, store appts, calling into support, and more myself several times for my personal needs & others', I feel sure I have loads of varied experience to address your concerns, reassure, clarify, and ideally, prevent this from happening to you again via going over each area you noted and offering viable sources as well as relatable ones in a manner you can in turn, defer to and find resolution in your grievance. I'm sure fellow users to the forum can also assist moreso, as well, if they haven't already ~


You began with:

"Recently I had my roommate take my iPhone 6 S Plus to the local Apple Store for my pre-arranged drop off of the phone to get a new battery. I had attempted to contact this store by phone twice to tell them I was having problems getting a ride to the mall to drop the phone off. However the phone rang and rang and no one ever answered so I contacted support.

■NOTE: Everything is on the right track currently. Support receives calls in the order received, including those for store appts, and they are equipped to deal with innumerable situations.

🍎So, this was actually a correct way to reach out. Resolved

●Cont-

"I told support about my issue and they offered to 'make notes' on my account that the store would see. They said they could not contact the store by phone directly ■(This is true. However, they will try to contact for the customer if they feel it can only help, even though the case log will specify the details & they are updated immediately. But, they prefer not to state this in case their call cannot get through or for misc reasons beyond control).

● "This is a a major issue to me that this store is so very difficult to get in touch with."

- - - It should not be. Let me explain why.

■NOTE: A) ALL stores are difficult to reach currently due to an overwhelming demand for batteries. However, procedures are in place & have been for quite some time to handle store calls & questions effectively (B) The stores can see the case notes and vice-versa- for ex: if a store made notes on a case, Support can view them by case # or other pertinent info, so be assured in this. Communication across stores & support is visible to both.

🍎 Resolved


●Cont-

"Support assured me it would be o.k. I even went so far as to reveal that I am blind/low vision and I was reliant on others to help me with the drop off of the phone and I said that in all likelihood, I would not be the person dropping off the phone.

■NOTE: Always give specific info on the person assisting you and ask that it's specifically noted in your case. You can also forward all info that Support emailed to you, to that person or ask Support to do so.

■***And, ALWAYS get a case # although one is emailed to you either during the call, after, or both to the email address you provide during that call. You would then provide that to your friend also.

🍎 ⚠ - You left an opportunity open here for disappointment


●Cont-

"My roommate took the phone in for me two

days ago. I was left at home with no phone. I

did, however, provide my California i.d. and a

hand written note with all pertinent information

and reiterating that it was o.k. for Apple

employees to work with my roommate in

regards to the changing of the battery."

⚠⚠ While you had good intent, this isn't realistic nor the only info needed and as a result, put your friend in an uncomfortable position.

🍎🚫PLEASE NOTE: A family member, an ex, another neighbor, or anyone with access to your ID or an acceptable form of ID for you, could've written a note and signed your name.

It's happened to lots of us, unfortunately!

Can you see that this method only is not secure?

- Apple employees are required to verify identity via very specific protocols for customer privacy & security. Any changes or additions to this would've been forwarded to the store and pulled up at the time of arrival, if made aware by the customer and applicable.

---》》The primary and most basic protocol is verifying the identity of the account holder- which is you. This was done via personally speaking with you since you could not be physically present & other conditions were met.


🍎The following statement confirms the Apple rep did such:


"My roommate called my neighbor due to

issues he was experiencing with the Apple

Store employees. My neighbor brought her

telephone to me and I spoke with the Apple

Employee who wanted my Apple I.D. (which I

had already provided in note I sent along

with my phone)and password which I

provided to him. He said "Great! That does

it.I'm in now."🍎《-- This is what WE customers

must expect from Apple -

they are constantly ensuring

our security. This is the #1

reason I stay with Apple. No

one has questioned me so

much on my own info & I'm

reassured by this.

🍎 Resolved via Apple store

- For your security, they must speak to the account holder, which is exactly what the store employee did. They simply needed your permission by protocol, which I'm sure you can now understand is to protect you & your device.

**Good job on having a backup plan via phoning the neighbor btw! You two must've known this

could be a possibility. Very smart to prepare.


➡- I touched upon this earlier briefly but I noticed it's a persistent issue that's upset you t/out & moreover, that could've been avoided, so I'll specify: Also & very specific to your situation, when you (a) not only ordered the battery (mention if you think it's a POSSIBILITY that another may show, as you knew your circumstances it appears) but also, (b) upon the appt set up/it being time to replace it (another chance to mention it and update status....and wait, another op....third - along with (c) you calling to update status for sure, you should've reiterated to the Apple staff to please note someone else was

bringing in your device & ask what to expect. You knew at this point exactly who, etc, so gathering details and writing them down would've helped all concerned.

But....I'd

not done it so much for Apple, but for you & your roommate as it could've prevented so much discord & cleared up expectations.


➡They can't help you unless you give them info necessary to do so. They notated & communicated info based on what you conveyed.

🍎 Apple relayed info given and as promised.

**By you communicating specifics, your roommate and you could've only then been

better prepared by support setting expectations based on this info by you & specific to your situation - before & during the appt.

Support could've then explained or clarified details (such as a personal call to you, the account holder, to verify

permission with you personally would be needed regardless, in order for another to handle the device and all that comes with it - including wait times, which are currently lengthy due to the influx of customers requesting battery replacements) or you could've asked to make sure which is what I prefer to do. With the above info in mind, this should also help with and address the comment below:


[To make a very long story short, when my roommate went back into the store to pick it up he was treated horribly. 🍎They left him **waiting for a long time and **did not really want to release the phone to him....]


●Regarding:

"What I will say is they hard shocked my phone

and they did not have my permission to do

that. They should not have assumed that I

had everything backed up because I did not"


■ Do you mean reset your phone or restored it for you? I've never heard of a "hard shock" & I've encountered a great deal of technical terminology with Apple & otherwise. Restoring a device at the time of repair however, is normal especially since the battery is internal to the phone, and as an added benefit, it helps clean up the device which allows it to behave anew/like a new device. You can always restore your data, if saved, just as you could to any device upon setup of a phone or restore.


- Also, they didn't assume and they ask that customers don't assume either but instead, take precautions and encourage self-awareness.

Formally, they do let customers know what they can expect. They expect that customers will want to best prepare for their device's repair & follow advice given and/or ask questions as needed or simply as they like.

■ Furthermore, anytime a device is brought in for repair, customers are given and/or informed of the following prior to - which includes the first thing a customer should do - Back up his/her device:


Article: Get your iPhone.....ready for repair or service:

🍎https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201557


**This article & the contents within are explained to us verbally when calling in for repairs, an appt, or related (in writing, via chat) and also, sent via the email address we/the customer provide at that time. It appears as a link that you can click on inside of the email for additional reference as well. It leads straight to the article & its

simple yet significant preparations that are listed.


🍎 Apple prepared you for a successful repair


I cannot tell you how many times this info has been given to me. I know it by heart now. Yes, I have several devices & innumerable others I have brought in on behalf of other users, so you can imagine. But, I'd rather Apple tech support go over it every single time, than become complacent, assume I know, or worse - not remind me, and I become lax and forget to ensure a device is prepped mostly by backing it up & turning off FMIP.


●Regarding:


"I've lost over $75 worth of itune music, etc.applications. I've lost pictures and documents."


➡ Check to see if iCloud may have some of this backed up by logging into iCloud.com or by calling Apple support to help verify your identity and in turn, confirm what is or isn't backed up via iCloud specific to your Apple ID. You'd be surprised at what gets

backed up to iCloud that some had no idea (to their pleasant surprise in cases of not backing up info prior to restores, etc). ➡Also, if you've ever synced to iTunes on a

particular PC or Mac, I'd check there for any content.

■ In reference to purchased items, redownload

them. That's a positive of purchased items you

didn't backup in this situation.

🍎 Self-solve



●Regarding the following, see the above and the following to help clarify:


"If Apple Staff was having a problem with my phone

➡[ I don't understand where Apple was having a problem with your phone; your statements confirm they were on point regarding the process]

●"they should have sent it back with my roommate and told him that I must come into the store myself"

➡[Again, why? They explained to you via the phone call they had what they needed, which was your confirmation that your roommate had full permission over the handling of your device not once but twice, to ensure your privacy & security as you noted.

🍎Ex: 1st time - it was upon bringing the phone in: You noted that "

He (Apple employee) said 'Great! That does it. I'm in now.'". Thus, he verified permission with you this first time.

🍎And, the....*2nd time - "

To make a very long story short, when my roommate went back into the store to pick it up he was treated horribly. They left him waiting for a long time and ----》》》 did not really want to release the phone to him. I will not go into the extremely rude questions"]

Kudos to that employee or employees. They "had your back", as they say - and each time.

In reference to you describing the questions asked as "rude", one is left to deduce this means the Apple store rep(s) needed and required definitive proof, once again, that your friend had the right to pick up YOUR personal device to ensure it would get back in your possession, so what did they do? They asked. It may have been inconvenient or uncomfortable for your friend, but your security is most important.

They cannot go on anything but protocol, which I'm sure you can see as logical. Otherwise, I or anyone could pick up your device and do as we like with it, especially as a newly restored, freshly maintained phone with a new battery. Thank goodness for the rep(s) requiring this of you, me, and everyone. We'd just need to return at that point to pick up your device "for you", if confirmation were only needed initially.

🍎 Apple followed security & privacy protocols and made sure your information and device were secure t/out the process.


Overall, I think it boiled down to approach and personal differences, essentially. I'm from the South and the home of hospitality, so I used to expect everyone to be "sweet", and I'll admit I still expect others to certainly be somewhat warm and friendly upon approach....most times...it's what I was raised around & who I am personally. But, I'm also a realist & find being direct with others is an absolute necessity, lots of time, particularly in business; I realize that not everyone can sugarcoat things or speak in a certain manner to me nor do situations always allot for that, if rarely....

However and in relation to this issue, as long as my device is secure, my privacy is at the forefront, and I'm given honest & direct info, I'm good. I may not like how you stated something or even how I feel you approached me at the time, but I respect the fact that you not only fixed my issue (replaced my battery), but you also protected my personal information no matter what I sent with a friend or neighbor, etc. - that security trumps all.

🍎Something to consider


Regarding:

● "They did not tell my roommate they shocked the phone and I was never told anything about prepping my phone or backing it up just to change a battery. No one gave me any instructions and I have not read anything about the Apple Staff having to hard shock phones to change the battery. "


■Once again, this is simply not so, and I feel sure you know this isn't "just about replacing a battery". This comment & related goes back to the beginning & was covered in several ways; it was clarified.


●Regarding:

"I want to report this issue and of course there

is no place on the entire website to do this. I

don't want to chat. I want to write it so that

there will be no question about what I've

said. I am furious about this and I would

really appreciate someone telling me the

address and better yet, a contact person and

address so that I can report this happening."


■ Well, you wrote it.

■ And, when you contacted Apple support, be assured they

documented your statements verbatim...literally. All calls are recorded so that any and all sources can see how best to handle any & all calls/issues presently and in the future as well as to make sure support is following procedures and offering 100% cistomer support & service whenever possible.

Although you made a call and feel this isn't enough, it most certainly is. It's the best way to have your voice heard, although you may not hear anything back. And, your identifying

info you gave is linked to the case and in turn,

the store's info, which will affect everyone involved there. The store will handle the issue on top of Apple's other protocols. Thus, your complaint is logged very distinctly and you have a case # for your reference should you need it.

Regardless as to who did what, how & why, I only know of

Apple taking all customers' concerns & situations into consideration and handling them thoroughly yet discreetly for all parties concerned. I know many who have been through the process on Apple's side as well. Complaints (as well as compliments) filed in the manner you did, are given certain consequences or certain rewards They are far from being ignored or left to sit in a system.


"In addition, I would really appreciate not

hearing

comments about how I should have

had my

phone backed up."


- I feel at this point, you know this. No need to

reiterate


● "The point here is, they

violated me by

removing lots of things from

my phone when

all they had to do was to

send it back home

to me saying they needed

to speak with me

before installing the

battery."

🍎 I feel Apple was your advocate, not your

enemy.


■ I feel, this too, is simply not the case and feel

confident you can see the logic now versus

letting your emotions get the best of you, as

we all do.


● "If anyone can provide the address,

name, etc.

of Apple's Dept. that handles issues

similar to mine, I would greatly appreciate it."


■ As stated above, unknowingly and/or by reaching out to the store, you got to the particular area you needed to in order to handle it accordingly and to ensure it will be reviewed, etc.


For those who read this, first I'm sorry if I was redundant in anything I posted that you may have already covered. I've left my phone away for a good while, then came back later to this open for reply.


🍎I'd add that I took my time to go through this post for various reasons as well as reiterate points more than once.

*Mostly, I did this bc I see so much of it, and maybe taking the time, will help others or even just one other person reflect and consider the reasoning and facts vs blaming or trying to lodge another complaint. A different perspective helps.

You never know what someone else is going through, including businesses, nor their protocols on certain things. I'm no mind reader, so if it were me, I'd wanna know. If you know info that can help clarify, please share ~

*I also made sure I simply took the time to validate & relate, as I can in fact relate as can most of us to these situations. Sometimes, that's all we need to hear.

*Also, to offer objectivity although I feel Apple employees actually did a great job of protecting the customer in this scenario. Ya' never know who may try to get your info and more. This makes me feel even better.

*Another reason - educate & prevent as well as prepare......never know who it may help

*Big reason: As of late and I bet, like many of you, I hear about some I work with and know of employees and people I or others know who lose their jobs - their livelihood, over complaints especially in customer service fields but also, essentially any business concerned with productivity. I can understand those that are justified but I simply ask, before you're quick to file a complaint, ask yourself if it's worth it. If so, file - just stick to the facts.

*Finally, has anyone on here ever been asked how to file a compliment or who to write to? I've not yet....

Wouldn't that be a nice change though....I'd rather put my efforts into that, to be fair :-)

Mar 9, 2018 6:42 PM

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Question: How to Handle a Really Negative Experience in Apple Store