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Question: iWork - Numbers training help needed

Does anyone offer training in Numbers?

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Hi Dean,


The last 'printed' manuals for Numbers were the Numbers '09 User Guide and the Formulas and Functions User Guide, published as searchable PDF files on the introduction of iWork '09, a software package which included Numbers, Pages and Keynote. The guides are still available here: Apple - Support - Manuals


A bit outdated (Numbers '09 was version 2.x), but the listed formulas and examples are still working, and the F&F guide gives a description, syntax, and at least one example for using each formula.


Similar information can be found in the Function Browser, which opens in the right sidebar of a Numbers document when you enter = in any cell. Double clicking a function name in the results list under a search in the browser will place that formula into the Formula Editor (which also opens when you type that =), filled with the hint lozenges showing 'what goes here' in the formula.


You can learn much about the functions by looking at a formula containing them and using the Function Browser:User uploaded file

Here, for example,I looked at the Regular pay calculation in E2 of the Summary table in the Employee Schedule template.


The blue selection rectangle tells me the cell containing the formula. The highlighted cell colours show me the cell used by the formula (same coloured lozenges).

There are three functions used in this formula, identified by the names in the three grey lozenges, each with a bite out of the right end (representing the opening parenthesis of the pair enclosing the arguments of that function). Clicking on the function name will highlight that function, and anything that it contains. Clicking on the small triangle to the right of the name opens a two item menu: Show in Function Browser, and Show Function as Text.


Do some exploring, do some reading, and if time and interest permit, do some experimenting.


And when you get stuck, come back and ask questions.


Regards,

Barry

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Mar 12, 2018 7:57 AM in response to jamdean In response to jamdean

What are you trying to do? Most training for general spreadsheets online is good for numbers. At least the basic concepts of data, formulas, etc...


Where Numbers comes into its own is how it has individual tables instead of one large sheet of rows and columns that is shared between tables. Each table and chart is its own thing in numbers. this also means each table has its own headers and footers, and each can be customaized


Jason

Question marked as Helpful

Mar 12, 2018 10:51 AM in response to jamdean In response to jamdean

Apple included several Templates with Numbers, most of which serve as excellent study material. Take a look at the Employee Schedule template in the Business section of the Template Chooser.


To open the Template Chooser, go to the File menu.

The first item will be either New or New from Template Chooser.

If that item is "New," press and hold to option key to change it to "New from Template Chooser."


Regards,

Barry

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Question marked as Helpful

Mar 12, 2018 7:57 AM in response to jamdean In response to jamdean

What are you trying to do? Most training for general spreadsheets online is good for numbers. At least the basic concepts of data, formulas, etc...


Where Numbers comes into its own is how it has individual tables instead of one large sheet of rows and columns that is shared between tables. Each table and chart is its own thing in numbers. this also means each table has its own headers and footers, and each can be customaized


Jason

Mar 12, 2018 7:57 AM

Reply Helpful (2)

Mar 12, 2018 7:57 AM in response to jaxjason In response to jaxjason

yes the online training is very good but the formulas and calculations are proving difficult for me to apply.


I'm starting with time keeping and pay calculation using regular and overtime rates of my current job as a novice level activity in preparation for more heavy lifting so to speak.


I will be starting my own business in the near future and need to get a much better grasp on the vast capabilities of it.


Seems I may need an actual class.

Mar 12, 2018 7:57 AM

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Question marked as Helpful

Mar 12, 2018 10:51 AM in response to jamdean In response to jamdean

Apple included several Templates with Numbers, most of which serve as excellent study material. Take a look at the Employee Schedule template in the Business section of the Template Chooser.


To open the Template Chooser, go to the File menu.

The first item will be either New or New from Template Chooser.

If that item is "New," press and hold to option key to change it to "New from Template Chooser."


Regards,

Barry

Mar 12, 2018 10:51 AM

Reply Helpful (1)

Mar 12, 2018 11:02 AM in response to Barry In response to Barry

Thanks Barry,


Exactly and this is a great starting point for me to get my feet wet with formulas and calculations but it gets very complicated quick for me.


can you point me in the direction of a way to understand whats's going on here and possibly how to set up this sort of thing. I know there must be some video tutorials on youtube and such but I can't seem to find exactly what I'm looking for.


Dean-0

Mar 12, 2018 11:02 AM

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Question marked as Solved

Mar 12, 2018 4:25 PM in response to jamdean In response to jamdean

Hi Dean,


The last 'printed' manuals for Numbers were the Numbers '09 User Guide and the Formulas and Functions User Guide, published as searchable PDF files on the introduction of iWork '09, a software package which included Numbers, Pages and Keynote. The guides are still available here: Apple - Support - Manuals


A bit outdated (Numbers '09 was version 2.x), but the listed formulas and examples are still working, and the F&F guide gives a description, syntax, and at least one example for using each formula.


Similar information can be found in the Function Browser, which opens in the right sidebar of a Numbers document when you enter = in any cell. Double clicking a function name in the results list under a search in the browser will place that formula into the Formula Editor (which also opens when you type that =), filled with the hint lozenges showing 'what goes here' in the formula.


You can learn much about the functions by looking at a formula containing them and using the Function Browser:User uploaded file

Here, for example,I looked at the Regular pay calculation in E2 of the Summary table in the Employee Schedule template.


The blue selection rectangle tells me the cell containing the formula. The highlighted cell colours show me the cell used by the formula (same coloured lozenges).

There are three functions used in this formula, identified by the names in the three grey lozenges, each with a bite out of the right end (representing the opening parenthesis of the pair enclosing the arguments of that function). Clicking on the function name will highlight that function, and anything that it contains. Clicking on the small triangle to the right of the name opens a two item menu: Show in Function Browser, and Show Function as Text.


Do some exploring, do some reading, and if time and interest permit, do some experimenting.


And when you get stuck, come back and ask questions.


Regards,

Barry

Mar 12, 2018 4:25 PM

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Question: iWork - Numbers training help needed