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Question: Clicking home button a lot can damage touch id?

In daily life we click a lot homebutton in our iphone because there is no any other button.So clicking lot can causing damageto the touch id?

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Apr 13, 2018 12:54 AM in response to Michael Black In response to Michael Black

Michael Black wrote:


It’s never been an issue on my iPhones or iPads with touchID. And they’ve been pressed countless times by now.


No company would design a primary access control that was not designed and tested to be used as intended. For people like myself where our iPhone is our only telephone, the home button gets pressed and used many dozens or more times daily, every day. Never had an issue with the home button or sensor.


To me it’s like worrying about wearing out your laptop‘s keyboard by actually typing with it, or never opening my car doors because I don’t want to wear out the door latches or handles. Things are designed for specific uses, so just use them as intended.


Depends on how it's being used. Some people (myself included) have actually worn out home buttons before because of a tendency to press down hard. I've had a home button on an older iOS device work intermittently, which was long enough to activate Assistive Touch before the home button completely died. Certainly people who have tried replacing them 3rd party have found that it only replaces the home button function, and that the fingerprint sensor no longer works.


The fingerprint sensor will probably be more robust than the physical button. The solid state home buttons using haptic touch/feedback (a piezoelectric vibration) are definitely less subject to physical wear.

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Mar 12, 2018 10:59 AM in response to Ramankanojia In response to Ramankanojia

Which model? If it's before the iPhone 7 with the solid-state button, then theoretically every press is creating physical wear on the button. However, the actual fingerprint reader is solid state, but it's moving up and down with the button.


At least on my iOS devices with a physical home button, I've enabled Assistive Touch and prefer to use the virtual home button rather than they physical one. When I use my fingerprint I try not to press down on it. But for my iPhone 7 I don't worry about it since it doesn't physically move other than vibration of the haptic feedback.

Mar 12, 2018 10:59 AM

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Mar 12, 2018 11:10 AM in response to Ramankanojia In response to Ramankanojia

It’s never been an issue on my iPhones or iPads with touchID. And they’ve been pressed countless times by now.


No company would design a primary access control that was not designed and tested to be used as intended. For people like myself where our iPhone is our only telephone, the home button gets pressed and used many dozens or more times daily, every day. Never had an issue with the home button or sensor.


To me it’s like worrying about wearing out your laptop‘s keyboard by actually typing with it, or never opening my car doors because I don’t want to wear out the door latches or handles. Things are designed for specific uses, so just use them as intended.

Mar 12, 2018 11:10 AM

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Question marked as Helpful

Apr 13, 2018 12:54 AM in response to Michael Black In response to Michael Black

Michael Black wrote:


It’s never been an issue on my iPhones or iPads with touchID. And they’ve been pressed countless times by now.


No company would design a primary access control that was not designed and tested to be used as intended. For people like myself where our iPhone is our only telephone, the home button gets pressed and used many dozens or more times daily, every day. Never had an issue with the home button or sensor.


To me it’s like worrying about wearing out your laptop‘s keyboard by actually typing with it, or never opening my car doors because I don’t want to wear out the door latches or handles. Things are designed for specific uses, so just use them as intended.


Depends on how it's being used. Some people (myself included) have actually worn out home buttons before because of a tendency to press down hard. I've had a home button on an older iOS device work intermittently, which was long enough to activate Assistive Touch before the home button completely died. Certainly people who have tried replacing them 3rd party have found that it only replaces the home button function, and that the fingerprint sensor no longer works.


The fingerprint sensor will probably be more robust than the physical button. The solid state home buttons using haptic touch/feedback (a piezoelectric vibration) are definitely less subject to physical wear.

Apr 13, 2018 12:54 AM

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Question: Clicking home button a lot can damage touch id?