Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next 85 Replies Latest reply: Mar 25, 2007 3:52 PM by nilscrasher Go to original post
  • Antonio Rocco Level 6 Level 6 (10,375 points)
    Eh yourself.

    In my experience bored teenagers are too cool to be bothered with anything like the amount of work required to hack into someone’s network. Besides how may bored teenagers out there are capable of doing it? True, there are certain individuals who can and do do it, but it takes them months. The well known exploitation tools out there are meaningless as there is more than effective security measures out there to defeat them because they areso well-known. As for the random IP thing, I regularly test this as part of my job and guess what it takes a lot of effort to do anything effective. Try it yourself, believe me you will get bored and fed up after 20 minutes, pretty much like a bored teenager would.

    As for the human race and its nature? Path of least resistance is what most people generally follow. If it involves a lot of work, they tend not to bother, there are far mor better things to do: watching paint dry. . . flowers grow. . . etc etc
  • Joeri Sebrechts Level 1 Level 1 (45 points)
    Could it be that the cat is simple triggering a reboot, the system logs in automatically, the cat does its evil things, and the system triggers the screen saver after a period of inactivity?

    1.25 Ghz Mac mini   Mac OS X (10.4.9)  
  • Court Kizer Level 1 Level 1 (95 points)
    Have any of you nutjobs thought of keeping your stupid cat off the keyboard? Maybe try taking a piece of cardboard and shooting some nails through it, then lay it over your keyboard, so the spikes are sticking up. Maybe your cat won't lay on a keyboard that was designed for typing.

    Seriously, your keyboard wasn't designed for your cat to sleep, go buy a cat bed and a heating pad to put under his/her blankets, cat and small animals love the warmth.
  • BrauBeaton Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    I'm still little concerned that while a solution has been found by installing a thrid party app (Keyboard Cleaner) that the problem itself was never deduced. Personally I feel it's always best to understand what the problem is before adding band-aid solutions or work-arounds. I posted the following diagnostic process before, but responded mid-thread (newby to .Mac) so it may have been missed:

    However, should I be worried that persons could be
    screwing with my desktop and files while my iBook is
    locked up in the screensaver? Is that a legitimate
    concern?


    It is very possible that the screensaver only blocks a person from being able to see any sensitive data and that the keyboard/trackpad still remains functional while the output to the screen is shut down.

    To test this:
    -Place the cursor over the System Preferences icon in the dock and then invoke the screensaver lock.
    -Try clicking the trackpad while the screen is locked. (You could even try blindly using the trackpad to move the cursor side-to-side and enter random clicks)
    -Unlock the screen and see if any applications have opened up.

    If you find open apps then you will know that the screensaver lock only blocks visible output, not keyboard/mouse inputs. This would then confirm it is not a matter of a cat subverting your security, but rather a case of the user believing its function is supposed to do more than it actually does. In this case, Keyboard Cleaner would be an obvious and appropriate solution.


    Quad G5   Mac OS X (10.4.9)  
  • BrauBeaton Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    I'm still little concerned that while a solution has been found by installing a thrid party app (Keyboard Cleaner) that the problem itself was never deduced. Personally I feel it's always best to understand what the problem is before adding band-aid solutions or work-arounds. I posted the following diagnostic process before, but responded mid-thread (newby to .Mac) so it may have been missed:

    However, should I be worried that persons could be
    screwing with my desktop and files while my iBook is
    locked up in the screensaver? Is that a legitimate
    concern?


    It is very possible that the screensaver only blocks a person from being able to see any sensitive data and that the keyboard/trackpad still remains functional while the output to the screen is shut down.

    To test this:
    -Place the cursor over the System Preferences icon in the dock and then invoke the screensaver lock.
    -Try clicking the trackpad while the screen is locked. (You could even try blindly using the trackpad to move the cursor side-to-side and enter random clicks)
    -Unlock the screen and see if any applications have opened up.

    If you find open apps then you will know that the screensaver lock only blocks visible output, not keyboard/mouse inputs. This would then confirm it is not a matter of a cat subverting your security, but rather a case of the user believing its function is supposed to do more than it actually does. In this case, Keyboard Cleaner would be an obvious and appropriate solution.
  • Pete K Level 2 Level 2 (285 points)
    Dude, you gotta think on an animals level. Every time you leave the room, pee in a circle around your iBook/territory. If this doesn't work, pick up some fox's urine.

    Peace.
  • nilscrasher Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Yeah, Thanks, man. I did try that. Locking the screen and blindly trying to activate programs and stuff. I just get that annoying beep that seems to come from pressing a key too many times. That happened also about a half hour ago when I locked the screen and held down a button (as if I were, say.. a sleeping cat) and I can't get the thing to unlock.

    My password is a 13 character string, mixed numbers and letters (some capitalized..) and I'm pretty sure that the cat isn't repeatedly, randomly entering my password.

    Yeah, I was also worried about the 3rd party, band-aid solution (although props to Keyboard Cleaner.. who I fully endorse for containing a cat-induced security disruption, by the way) to try to fix a problem which I felt presented a greater concern. Anyway, I'm still just loving all the suggestions and I'm trying them all. Learned a bunch over the last 48 hours.

    Thanks to all.
  • nilscrasher Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    If you can tell me where to buy fox urine in Rome, Italy.. well, I'd give that a shot. Yeah, I'm one of those American losers that thinks he can write a better novel by simply living in a European city.. one where I wouldn't even know where to buy fox urine.

    Cheers, man.
  • Klaus1 Level 8 Level 8 (46,490 points)
    It's pretty much a common stance that Macs (yes, even 10.4.9) are easy to exploit, and it's proven to be more true every week.

    Are you for real?

    Or just stirring the fertilizer?
  • BrauBeaton Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Yeah, I was also worried about the 3rd party,
    band-aid solution (although props to Keyboard
    Cleaner.. who I fully endorse for containing a
    cat-induced security disruption, by the way) to try
    to fix a problem which I felt presented a greater
    concern. Anyway, I'm still just loving all the
    suggestions and I'm trying them all. Learned a bunch
    over the last 48 hours.

    Thanks to all.


    Just so you know, I picked up this thread while reading Digg: http://digg.com/apple/Whycats_can_never_be_trusted_Cat_beats_iBooksecurity

    Seems you've become a bit of a poster boy for Mac security, or lack of it, punditry.
  • nilscrasher Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Yes, if only I had enough time to keep the cat off my keyboard, politely directing her back to her cat bed.. but I don't.
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