5 Replies Latest reply: Jun 5, 2007 2:35 PM by adeorlando
pattisnyder Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
Is there a way to hook one Apple TV up to multiple TV's to view video's at the same time? Like have one in the bedroom and one in the living room???

Mac OS X (10.4.9)
  • Jeff Greenberg Level 3 Level 3 (585 points)
    Is there a way to hook one Apple TV up to multiple
    TV's to view video's at the same time? Like have one
    in the bedroom and one in the living room???


    I don't think so. You can try one of those wireless TV broadcasters but I think they're lousy. ATV isn't a whole-house video distribution system.
  • Winston Churchill Level 10 Level 10 (88,920 points)
    There are some HDMI splitters on the market that will do the job, BUT:

    Between two such locations, the distance is likely to be too much for HDMI.
    You'll likely pay as much for a splitter as a new tv.

    The same applies to component.
  • Glorfindeal Level 6 Level 6 (9,330 points)
    You can get a hdmi signal booster, but they are expensive. Like you said, cheaper just to buy another ATV and stick it in the bedroom...


    Glor
  • MSwimelar Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Not an elegant solution, but the ATV is so small and easy to hook up, I believe you could just move it back and forth when you need to.
  • adeorlando Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Yes, you can. I have my Apple TV, DVD, and Cablebox hooked up to 6 televisions, plus audio wall controls in several rooms.

    Whatever output you are using, you are going to need to split the signal and also amplify it - otherwise you'll lose signal quality. So, you need a Distributor / Amplifier that will take whatever input you want to provide it from your Apple TV and give you with multiple amplified outputs to run to different TVs.

    I also had the constraint of wanting to use existing co-axial cable (i.e. a standard TV antena cable) to transmit the signal because that's what I already have run to multiple rooms. For this part, you would need an "Apple TV S-Video Converter" (do a Google search on that for a vendor). This takes the component video out from your Apple TV and converts it to an S-Video signal (i.e. a composite video signal that you can run over co-axial cable). It's true that composite video isn't as good as HDMI or component video connections, but it's perfectly workable and it makes everything else easier and less expensive presuming that you'd otherwise have to run new cables.

    A final thing worth considering is a remote IR solution (such as Powermid) so that you can control your Apple TV from any room in the house.

    Hope this answers your question, and good luck with it.