Previous 1 2 Next 29 Replies Latest reply: Dec 6, 2010 7:18 PM by Bob Timmons
Rick Wilson Level 1 Level 1 (70 points)
Going to Europe for an extended stay. The apartment has ethernet but no wireless. I'm looking for a small wireless router to take and use. Of course, it would need to work on 220V (and 110 when I get back home).

It would need to be secured (WAP?) and only a few computers will have access through the router. Would the Airport Express be the best to use? My mac would need internet access on the Mac side and Windows (using Parallels). Other users may be PC's.

What is my best option? Thanks

G5 and MacBook Pro, Mac OS X (10.5.8)
  • Bob Timmons Level 10 Level 10 (92,310 points)
    Would the Airport Express be the best to use?


    Welcome to the discussion area, Rick!

    Don't know if it is the best, but it has worked great for me for years at hotels with ethernet connections. It will run on 50-60Hz, 100-220V just fine as long as you have the right adapter in your bag.

    You can select the Radio Mode and Security that you want to use and provide a wireless signal for up to 10 devices. Computers will connect using wireless only. If you need additional ethernet ports, and dual band radio modes you'll need to look at an AirPort Extreme.

    Message was edited by: Bob Timmons
  • Rick Wilson Level 1 Level 1 (70 points)
    When you say up to 10 devices, are you referring to 10 computers? Does Radio mode use DHCP? or can you fix mac addresses?

    Does it have to be configured (like when adding a router at home onto a DSL modem - ie, gateway, subnet, etc.) or is it simply a plug and play on the ethernet system? Can I plug it into my ethernet at home and set it up and then plug it in there in Europe and it will work?

    Wireless for my Mac, ipod and iphone is all I need. I'm not looking at streaming music, etc. to other devices. What is the dual band mode for on the Airport Extreme?

    Sorry for all of the questions. I need to know how easy it is to set up, whether it will work well, etc. Thanks
  • Bob Timmons Level 10 Level 10 (92,310 points)
    When you say up to 10 devices, are you referring to 10 computers?


    Could be up to a total of 10 computers, iPods, iPads, iPhones or any other device that uses wireless to connect.

    Does Radio mode use DHCP?


    It could, but you would run into a Double NAT situation on the network. Normally, you would configure the AirPort Express in "Bridge Mode" since the main router that it would connect to would already be setup to handle DHCP services.

    can you fix mac addresses?


    You mean "static addresses" here? Not if the Express is in Bridge Mode. Yes, if it is handling DHCP.

    Does it have to be configured (like when adding a router at home onto a DSL modem - ie, gateway, subnet, etc.) or is it simply a plug and play on the ethernet system?

    It will take a few minutes for you to assign a name to the device, establish a name for the wireless network and setup a password for the wireless. It might work "as is" out of the box, but there would be no security on the wireless so anyone in the area could log on.

    Can I plug it into my ethernet at home and set it up and then plug it in there in Europe and it will work?


    Yes, if you have a spare port on your main router to plug into. Once you have the device configured, it will retain its settings.

    What is the dual band mode for on the Airport Extreme?


    This allows faster wireless devices to connect to the new high speed 5 GHz band while normal devices to connect to the usual 2.4 GHz band at the same time. It's like having 2 networks in 1.

    Because most cordless phones and wireless security systems also use the 2.4 GHz band, there is much more wireless interference on this band. Most of the devices you list (iPhone, iPad) would not be able to connect to the 5 GHz band, so you would not need the AirPort Extreme.

    If you decide to get the Express, post back if you want a step by step on how to configure the device for travel.

    Message was edited by: Bob Timmons
  • Rick Wilson Level 1 Level 1 (70 points)
    Thanks, I am currently shopping for one. I need an adapter for it (and 1 for my Mac) to convert to European outlets. What's the best and cheapest route?
  • Bob Timmons Level 10 Level 10 (92,310 points)
    Don't really know what the best and cheapest route would be. I bought a nice set at Target for about $15.

    Radio Shack or any other major electronics store will have what you need.

    The airport shop will have what you need as well, but it cost twice as much there.
  • Rick Wilson Level 1 Level 1 (70 points)
    I ordered the Airport Express. I'll post back for assistance when it arrives.

    I found and purchased an Apple World Travel Adapter kit $20. These will exactly interchange with the duckhead on the Express.

    Thanks for the headsup about the adapters at Target. I'll need a few more for other items.
  • Bob Timmons Level 10 Level 10 (92,310 points)
    Here's how to setup your AirPort Express:

    You can go ahead and connect it to an available port on your router to simulate the setup at another location. The AX provides a default wireless network with a name like apple network xxxxxx. You have to connect to this wireless network on your computer so you can configure the AX. There is no security on the network.

    Open AirPort Utility - Click Manual Setup

    Click the Base Station tab just below the row of icons to assign a name to your AX, a device password (write this down) and adjust Time Zone settings.

    Click the Wireless tab
    Wireless Mode = Create a wireless network
    Wireless Network Name = Your choice
    No check mark is needed next to "Allow network to be extended"
    Radio Mode = 802.11n (802.11b/g compatible) will allow virtually any device to connect
    Wireless Security = WPA/WPA2 Personal a good choice
    Wireless Password = Your choice (write this down as well)
    Confirm Password

    Click the Internet icon
    Connect Using = Ethernet
    Connection Sharing = Off (Bridge Mode)*
    Update to save settings

    The AX will restart in 45-60 seconds and you should have a green light. Use your computer to locate the name of the wireless network that you established and see if you can log on that way and get an Internet connection. You should be all set.

    *Bridge Mode is the correct setting to work on other ethernet networks. This will usually allow you to connect with more than one wireless device. Sometimes, the router that controls the ethernet network where you are connecting will only allow one device to connect. If that is the case, you can change the setting for Connection Sharing to "Share a public IP address"

    When you do this, you will usually get a warning about a Double NAT on your network. Click "ignore". Depending on what type of router you have there now, you may be able to test this out at home as well. Post back on that so we can clarify.

    Message was edited by: Bob Timmons
  • Rick Wilson Level 1 Level 1 (70 points)
    Thanks - I'll post back when I get it and attempt to set it up.
  • Rick Wilson Level 1 Level 1 (70 points)
    Ok, I got the Airport Express last night. Plugged it into my gigabit switch this morning and got it all set up. I am able to connect my computer and iphone to the network without any issues.


    I set the connection to: Connection Sharing = Off (Bridge Mode)*

    I did not get any messages about a double NAT. Is this because I plugged it into a switch instead of the router? Obviously I won't have a switch in Europe. Well, actually I do have a spare switch - a Milan 10/100 switch which will use 110 - 240 V. Could I plug that into the ethernet in Europe and plug the Airport Express into that?

    This way, if someone comes over they could plug in and access the internet without me having to setup wireless access for them and removing it when they leave.

    Oh, and do I have to change the time zone when I move it to Europe?

    Message was edited by: Rick Wilson
  • Bob Timmons Level 10 Level 10 (92,310 points)
    I did not get any messages about a double NAT


    That's because you are in "bridge mode" on the AirPort Express.

    If you check my post, I mentioned that the probable NAT issue would be associated with another setting..."Share a public IP address"

    If you have the time, try changing the setting from "bridge mode" to "share a public IP address" and watch what happens. You'll probably get the Double NAT notice along with an option to "ignore" the issue. What happens if you try this there?

    On the road, you should only try the "share" setting if "bridge mode" will not allow multiple wireless devices to connect. "Share" may or may not work at any given hotel. It's a last resort when the correct setting of "bridge mode" is not doing what you want.

    Message was edited by: Bob Timmons
  • Bob Timmons Level 10 Level 10 (92,310 points)
    Could I plug that into the ethernet in Europe and plug the Airport Express into that?
    This way, if someone comes over they could plug in and access the internet without me having to setup wireless access for them and removing it when they leave.


    Yes, that would work again assuming that the "main" router will supply IP addresses to multiple devices.

    Oh, and do I have to change the time zone when I move it to Europe?


    The time zone setting is used to reference connection times, log entries and internet activity for the Express. You can change this if you want, or leave it alone.

    Message was edited by: Bob Timmons
  • Rick Wilson Level 1 Level 1 (70 points)
    Not sure if it matters but I am plugged into a switch which is plugged into my router.

    Changing to "Share a public IP address" I get the following:

    Correct the 4 problems below before updating this Airport Wireless Device.

    DHCP beginning address
    DHCP ending address
    Allow SMP over WAN
    Allow setup over WAN

    The DHCP range you have entered conflicts with the WAN IP address of your airport Wireless Device.
    Selecting DHCP Beginning Address gives
    DHCP Beginning Address: 192.168.1.XXX (XXX are actually numbers)

    Selecting DHCP ending address gives
    DHCP ending address 192.168.1.XXX

    Selecting Allow SMP over WAN gives
    Allow SMP over WAN
    The airport wireless device is set up to allow SNMP on Ethernet WAN port, which decreases network security.

    Allow SNMP over WAN is checked

    Select "Ignore this problem" if you do not want to change this setting.
    Ignore this problem is not currently checked.



    Selecting Allow setup over WAN gives
    Allow setup over WAN

    The airport wireless device is set up to allow configuration over Ethernet WAN port, which decreases network security.

    Allow setup over WAN is checked.

    Select "Ignore this problem" if you do not want to change this setting.
    Ignore this problem is not currently checked.

    What should I do?

    Another question, after looking through the options in Airport Utility should I check the box "Create a Closed Network" under the Wireless Network Options button on the Wireless tab? This would prevent anyone knowing the network existed, correct?

    Message was edited by: Rick Wilson

    Message was edited by: Rick Wilson
  • Rick Wilson Level 1 Level 1 (70 points)
    Bob Timmons wrote:
    Could I plug that into the ethernet in Europe and plug the Airport Express into that?
    This way, if someone comes over they could plug in and access the internet without me having to setup wireless access for them and removing it when they leave.


    Yes, that would work again assuming that the "main" router will supply IP addresses to multiple devices.


    Wouldn't the "main" router see only the IP address of the switch and my switch would control the other IP addresses? Therefore, the "main" router would only see 1. Would this also allow me to always use Bridge mode and not have to worry about sharing and it's issues?

    Sorry for all of the questions but a non-techy person is going over first and I'd like for this to be plug and play.
  • Bob Timmons Level 10 Level 10 (92,310 points)
    On the DHCP beginning address:

    For example, your address now might look like 192.168.1.x

    Change this to read 192.168.2.x

    Do the exact same thing for the ending address

    OK to Allow SMP over WAN

    OK to allow setup over WAN
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