Previous 1 2 3 4 5 Next 109 Replies Latest reply: Apr 27, 2013 1:13 PM by Cerniuk Go to original post
  • softwater Level 5 (5,370 points)

    Have a look here, guys


    http://applehelpwriter.com/2011/09/13/turn-off-resume-the-definitive-solution/

     

    This has worked for me and many others, but I have to admit one person who tried it said it didn't work for them.

  • opodder Level 1 (0 points)

    JoeyR wrote:

     

    While I do agree that there needs to be an option to make the checkbox selection persistent, I do not believe there is a privacy issue.  If someone can see what was on your screen when you shut it down, they also have access to everything else on your system.  You should always have your system require that you enter your login credentials at boot (as opposed to automatically logging you in).  If someone else can't log into your computer, they will never see the applications restart.

     

    Again... I definitely want my election upon shutdown to remain permanent, but with respect to privacy and/or security you're no more or less at risk with this "feature" unless you're not requiring a login.  In which case any data on your system is available to anyone that turns it on.

     

    I think when referring to privacy he may have meant that he would not want someone else who can see his screen (ie someone sitting next to him) when he logs in to know what was previously open last time he logged out.

     

     

    I also hate the fact you cannot change the defaut behaviour of this feature. I don't like the terminal fix that has been suggested either, because that switches it off completely. All I want is to change the default behaviour to unchecked, or for the OS to remember my last selection.

    I have sent feedback to Apple: http://www.apple.com/feedback/macosx.html

    Please do so too.

  • William Donelson Level 4 (2,495 points)

    The reality is, this feature should NOT be a logout feature.

     

    You should be given this option at Login time.

  • billearl Level 2 (175 points)

    William Donelson wrote:

     

    The reality is, this feature should NOT be a logout feature.

     

    You should be given this option at Login time.

    Excellent point. Or make it a permanent setting.

  • Bay Area Pete Level 1 (0 points)

    The problem I have had is if the system hangs and I do a force power down, on powering back up the system reopens the original windows, and one of them caused the hang! It is very hard to interact with the system to get out of this loop. This is the dumbest default setting yet implemented by Apple developers! This web page gives a possible way to disable this feature.

    http://osxdaily.com/2011/08/25/disable-reopen-windows-when-logging-back-in-in-ma c-os-x-lion-completely/

  • William Donelson Level 4 (2,495 points)

    Bay Area Pete wrote:  This web page gives a possible way to disable this feature.

    http://osxdaily.com/2011/08/25/disable-reopen-windows-when-logging-back-in-in-ma c-os-x-lion-completely/

    A much easier way, requires no downloaded software:

     

    1. Close all windows and quit all apps.

    2. In Finder, hold down the Option key and click ‘Go’ in the menu bar at the top.

    3. Choose ‘Library’ (you have to have the Option key held down to see Library in the menu).

    4. Navigate to Library > Preferences > ByHost > com.apple.loginwindow.[xxxxxxxxx].plist

    The [xxxxxxxx] represent some interminable string of numbers and letters. Don’t mistake it for the similarly entitled Unix executable file. What you need to check is that its ‘loginwindow’ and ‘.plist’ at the end.

    5. When you’re sure you’ve identified the right file, select it and press Cmd-i to show the ‘Get Info’ window. Click the ‘Locked’ option.

    6. Now, test that it works. Close the ‘Get info’ window and the finder window. Open up Safari, Preview and a couple of windows. Do a restart and behold — if you followed the instructions correctly — a clean desktop!

  • softwater Level 5 (5,370 points)

    I already linked to that post at the top of this page (which, in fact, is originally due to a solution provided by ASC poster billearl), but it's not the entire solution. You should also do steps 7 - 10:

     

    7. Go to the ~/Library/ Saved Application State folder.

    8. Select all the contents inside and send them to Trash.

    9. Right-click on the Saved Application State folder’s icon and choose ‘Get Info’ (or press cmd-i).

    10. Click the ‘Locked’ option. If it's greyed out, go down to the padlock at the bottom, click on that and enter your password. You should now be able to check the ‘Locked’ option.

  • Tom in London Level 4 (1,610 points)

    Add me to the list of people who want this stupid feature to be discontinued. Apart from the security risks mentioned by others, I just can't understand the reasoning process within Apple. I wonder how many development meetings they had, when this was discussed, and what the logic was for incorporating it? I mean, who would want it?

     

    Back in the old OS9 days there used to be a thing called Startup Items. The user could decide what they wanted to happen at startup. Why didn't Apple just bring that back?

     

    So I'm not only p***ed, I'm also puzzled.

  • softwater Level 5 (5,370 points)

    Tom in London wrote:

     

    Back in the old OS9 days there used to be a thing called Startup Items. The user could decide what they wanted to happen at startup. Why didn't Apple just bring that back?

     

     

    That feature still exists. It's called 'login items', located in

     

    System Prefs > Users & Groups | [your account] | Login Items.

  • Tom in London Level 4 (1,610 points)

    softwater wrote:

     

    That feature still exists. It's called 'login items', located in

     

    System Prefs > Users & Groups | [your account] | Login Items.

     

    I meant to say "why didn't Apple just leave that?"

     

    We don't need and don't want the computer to start up a whole bunch of stuff that we didn't specify.

  • softwater Level 5 (5,370 points)

    Agreed.

  • Bay Area Pete Level 1 (0 points)

    Yup, that worked!

    Thanks

  • davidfromgreat yarmouth Level 1 (0 points)

    I've found a reasonable solution.

     

    Use space bar to untick the box.

     

    My shut down proccedure.

     

    1) Hit the power button.

    2) Press the spacebar

    3) Press Enter

     

    It's not ideal but saves using the mouse on the tiy little box....

  • Jim Vance Level 3 (565 points)

    Excellent, davidfromgreatyarmouth!

  • softwater Level 5 (5,370 points)

    Jim Vance wrote:

     

    Excellent, davidfromgreatyarmouth!

     

    Not really. The OP wants to know how to change the default, not what Finder's keyboard shortcuts are for moving around and manipulating dialogue boxes.

Previous 1 2 3 4 5 Next