Previous 1 2 Next 17 Replies Latest reply: Sep 17, 2012 5:25 PM by MlchaelLAX
bretkennedy Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

HI all. I have lion installed on amy macbook pro.

 

I have purchased a new external hard drive to install snow leopard on to this.

 

steps to create.

 

 

format hard drive 2 partitions, 1 install 10 gig the second labeled leopard

set partition to GUID settings in disk utility

create snow leopard image, mounted

in restore section of disk utility, place snow leopard image in source, and install partition indestination

ok, enter password, scandisk ok, install dvd copies to install location

reboot into mac, option key then click on install. then the computer hangs

 

i waited 16 minutes thinking it woudl take a while but nothing.

 

 

any ideas onwhat I am doing wrong?

 

bret


MacBook Pro
  • Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (260,660 points)

    Drive Preparation

     

    1. Open Disk Utility in your Utilities folder.

     

    2. After DU loads select your hard drive (this is the entry with the mfgr.'s ID and size) from the left side list. Click on the Partition tab in the DU main window.

     

    3. Under the Volume Scheme heading set the number of partitions from the drop down menu to two. Size each to your preferences. Click on the Options button, set the partition scheme to GUID then click on the OK button. Set the format type to Mac OS Extended (Journaled.) Click on the Partition button and wait until the process has completed.

     

    4. Select the first partition you just created (this is the sub-entry under the drive entry) from the left side list. Click on the Erase tab in the DU main window.

     

    5. Set the format type to Mac OS Extended (Journaled.) Click on the Security button, check the button for Zero Data and click on OK to return to the Erase window.

     

    6. Click on the Erase button. The format process can take up to several hours depending upon the drive size.

     

    7. Repeat steps 4-6 for the second partition.

     

    8. After formatting is completed quit DU.

     

    To install Snow Leopard:

     

    Boot from your Snow Leopard Installer disc. When the installer is ready with rinstalling Snow Leopard. 

  • bretkennedy Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    After 9 hours of formatting this did not work. I put the install disk in held the option key down to reboot into the disk chose the install leopard disk and thats where it sat for another half an hour. I cant run insta from inside lion. What the heck is going wrong? Surely it can't be that hard to install this on an external drive?

  • Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (260,660 points)

    This only works with Snow Leopard, not Leopard as you've stated: "reboot into the disk chose the install leopard disk."

     

    Maybe you will tell me what model you have. Open System Information and post what you finde displayed for Model Identifier. I think you are trying to install Snow Leopard from a model that came with Lion pre-installed. If so what you want to do is far more complex because your computer cannot be booted from a retail Snow Leopard DVD.

  • bretkennedy Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    ok I think that may be the problem. why is it so difficult? I mean you pay $40 for a full working copy of snow leopard, thinking that you can install it on an external drive, and it turns out it is for a specific lion install. BLah.

     

    ok here is what it says when I double click the install snow leopard icon on the disk

     

    You can't use this version of the application install mac osx with this version of mac osx

     

    you have install mac osx 23.1.1

     

     

    also here is the full list of info for my macbook pro.

     

    macbook pro 15 - inch. mid 2010

     

    processor 2.66 ghz intel core i7

    6 gig ddr 3 memor (1067)

    nvidia geeforce gt 330m 512

    softwareL osx lion 10.7.4

     

    is there any more info I can get for you that will work?

     

    bret

  • Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (260,660 points)

    I think you misunderstood. Your computer requires Snow Leopard 10.6.6 or later. The retail Snow Leopard DVD installs 10.6.3. It cannot boot your model. Oh, and Snow Leopard is $29.00, not $40.00.

     

    Anyway, here's what you can do:

     

    How To Run Snow Leopard On A New Mac

     

    This does not apply to new Mac Minis or MacBook Airs. When newer models are introduced that also require Lion for hardware support, the techniques described below will no longer work with the possible exception of using Parallels 7.

     

    What has to be done:

     

    1. Create a new partition on the hard drive.
    2. Get a clone of a 10.6.8 Snow Leopard system. Put the cloned Snow Leopard system onto the new partition.
    3. In your case rather than installing onto a partition on your hard drive, just install it on your external hard drive.

     

    Step One: Create a new partition on the hard drive

     

    To resize the drive and create a new partition do the following:

     

    1.   Restart the computer and after the chime press and hold down the COMMAND and R keys until the menu screen appears. Alternatively, restart the computer and after the chime press and hold down the OPTION key until the boot manager screen appears. Select the Recovery HD and click on the downward pointing arrow button.

     

           After the main menu appears select Disk Utility and click on the Continue button. Select the hard drive's main entry then click on the Partition tab in the DU main window.

     

    2.   You should see the graphical sizing window showing the existing partitions. A portion may appear as a blue rectangle representing the used space on a partition.

     

    PartitionTableinDU.png

     

    3.   In the lower right corner of the sizing rectangle for each partition is a resizing gadget. Select it with the mouse and move the bottom of the rectangle upwards until you have reduced the existing partition enough to create the desired new volume's size. The space below the resized partition will appear gray. Click on the Apply button and wait until the process has completed.  (Note: You can only make a partition smaller in order to create new free space.)

     

    4.   Click on the [+] button below the sizing window to add a new partition in the gray space you freed up. Give the new volume a name, if you wish, then click on the Apply button. Wait until the process has completed.

     

    You should now have a new volume on the drive.

     

    It would be wise to have a backup of your current system as resizing is not necessarily free of risk for data loss.  Your drive must have sufficient contiguous free space for this process to work.

     

    Step Two: Obtain a clone of a Snow Leopard system:

     

    You will need access to a Mac already running Snow Leopard. You will need a 16 GB USB flash drive or an external hard drive to which you can clone the Snow Leopard system from the Mac that has Snow Leopard installed. Alternatives are:

     

    Option One:

     

    1. Install a new Snow Leopard system onto a USB flash drive. Boot the Mac used for installing with the USB flash drive. Update the flash drive system to 10.6.8 using the Mac OS X 10.6.8 Update Combo v1.1 to update Snow Leopard. Verify that you can boot the Mac with the USB flash drive.
    2. Take the USB flash drive to your new Mac and try booting from it. If it works then clone the system from the flash drive to the newly made partition:

     

     

              Clone using Restore Option of Disk Utility

     

    1. Open Disk Utility from the Utilities folder.
    2. Select the destination volume from the left side list.
    3. Click on the Restore tab in the DU main window.
    4. Check the box labeled Erase destination.
    5. Select the destination volume from the left side list and drag it to the Destination entry field.
    6. Select the source volume from the left side list and drag it to the Source entry field.
    7. Double-check you got it right, then click on the Restore button.

     

              Destination means the new partition on the internal drive. Source means the USB flash drive.

     

    Option Two:

     

    If you have a large enough external drive you can erase and use, then it would be easier to just clone the entire Snow Leopard system from the source Mac computer to the external drive.

     

              Clone using Restore Option of Disk Utility

     

    1. Open Disk Utility from the Utilities folder.
    2. Select the destination volume from the left side list.
    3. Click on the Restore tab in the DU main window.
    4. Check the box labeled Erase destination.
    5. Select the destination volume from the left side list and drag it to the Destination entry field.
    6. Select the source volume from the left side list and drag it to the Source entry field.
    7. Double-check you got it right, then click on the Restore button.

     

              Destination means the external drive. Source means the Snow Leopard Mac's internal drive.

     

    After cloning verify that it will boot the source Mac. If so then take the external drive to your new Mac boot with it. If all is well then restore the clone to the new partition on your new Mac:

     

              Restore the clone using Disk Utility

     

    1. Open Disk Utility from the Utilities folder.
    2. Select the destination volume from the left side list.
    3. Click on the Restore tab in the DU main window.
    4. Check the box labeled Erase destination.
    5. Select the destination volume from the left side list and drag it to the Destination entry field.
    6. Select the source volume from the left side list and drag it to the Source entry field.
    7. Double-check you got it right, then click on the Restore button.

     

              Destination means the new partition on the internal drive. Source means the external drive.

     

    If the above seems too daunting then you might consider running Snow Leopard inside an emulator such as Parallels 7. You are permitted to install a single copy of Snow Leopard inside a virtual machine. You will need to first purchase a copy of Parallels 7 and install it on your new Mac. Create a new virtual machine configured for Mac OS X. You may then install Snow Leopard in the virtual machine then download Mac OS X 10.6.8 Update Combo v1.1 and update to 10.6.8. Be sure to include Rosetta in your initial Snow Leopard installation. Rosetta is not installed by default rather it's an optional install.

  • bretkennedy Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    ok firstly, lets not argue about how much I paid for the operating system because you are giving me a great amount of help, but I am telling you now that I paid $34 for the snow leopard disk and 5 dollars postage, that makes $39.....

     

    secondly, i purchased this disk directly from apple. Why would they not be selling the latest version of snow leopard from the store? I know you probably can't answer that becuase you don't work for them, but that just makes absolutely no sense to me, seriously.

     

    all of the above options involve me getting 10.6.8 which I would have thought be the version of snow leopard I purchased... but obviously that is wrong.

     

    I don't have a mac that is already running snow leopard, that is why I am purchasing a new one....

     

    so basically you are saying that I can't use this snow leopard to boot or install onto a hard drive that I have without somehow getting a clone of 10.6.8?

  • Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (260,660 points)

    They did sell you the latest version that was produced as a retail DVD. Subsequent versions of Snow Leopard were special builds made for new hardware. Apple never released a retail DVD beyond 10.6.3. That's just the way it is.

     

    Yes, basically I am telling you that the retail Snow Leopard you have cannot boot your computer nor be installed on it directly. Either you obtain a clone of 10.6.8 or create your own by first installing 10.6.3 from the DVD you have then updating it to 10.6.8. You would need to do this on an older computer model that can boot from your Snow Leopard DVD.

     

    As an alternative you can purchase Parallels and install your Snow Leopard version as a virtual machine as I've indicated in the last paragraph. The advantage of this is running both operating systems concurrently.

  • bretkennedy Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    ok how about this.

     

    I have a computer here that has 10.8 snow leopard on it. It is password protected though so I can't do the restore through the disc utility.

     

    my thoughts are what if I create the external hard drive as follows on my computer.

     

    partition 2 partitions

    1 has the install section, the other is the extra drive space

    then on the other computer reboot into the external hard drive and install the os from there?

     

    i need to be super careful though as I don't want to touch his hard drive at all as i may screw it up and then I will be in deep ****.!!!

     

    bret

  • Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (260,660 points)

    What good will that do you until you are able to create a bootable clone of 10.6.8 that you can use? Furthermore, if you are using a FileVault encrypted drive then I would leave well enough alone especially if you don't have a backup.

     

    Just find someone with an older Mac model you can use to perform the surgery. Get yourself a 16 GB USB flash drive on which to plant the 10.6.8 system.

  • bretkennedy Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    ok,  here is the youtube video describing how you can create a 'bootable' copy of snow leopard on an external hard drive.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCZu23C8a78

     

    This is what I am trying to do. I have purpose purchased an external hard drive, which is 1 tb in size to install snow leopard, so that I can use final cut pro and compressor, which is not compatible with lion on that external 1tb drive. This is not a filevault encrypted drive, and I have never said that it was.... its sole purpose was an external drive to put snow leopard on.. thats it.

     

     

    Now according to this youtube video, by partitioning, and restoring the boot image from the snow leopard dvd onto the install partition of the external hard drive, you can then 'boot' into that hard drive install partition, and install snow leopard on the external hard drive.

     

    Now we have already established that I can get no further than the boot up screen on my mac, as the computer hangs.

     

    My options as I thought may work, would be to follow the instructions on the youtube video to get the hard drive ready. then take the hard drie out, plug it into the other mac which is running snow leopard 10.8 already, reboot the mac, hold down the option key, and then choose the install partition on the external drive, and then go ahead and install snow leopard on that drive. This then would be what I though according to the instructions, a bootable copy of snow leopard, created from snow leopard. Then when I plug the hard drive back into my mac and boot it up, I would have a bootable copy of snow leopard on the external hard drive that I can use. I would then use the upgrade pack that I have downloaded to upgrade 10.6.3 to 10.6.8 ot what ever the update makes it, and I would then be set

     

    am I wrong in the way that I am thinking?

  • Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (260,660 points)

    Which is what I've already suggested you can do but only if you can do it on a Mac that can boot Snow Leopard 10.6.3.

     

    Wouldn't it be easier just to upgrade to FCPX which is compatible with Lion/ML?

  • bretkennedy Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    hahahaha. it might be, but fcp is not the only program, and I can't afford the upgrade right now.

     

    I know you are probably annoyed with me right now, but given that the computer is not mine, I just dont want to make the terrible mistake of over writing his hard drive, so I am just trying to make clear exactly what I am doing.

     

    if i label CLEARLY my external hard drive, at the intiation of the setup process, there will be no way I CAN NOT distinguish between his hard drive and my external hard drive right? so I can definately choose my hard drive to install on straight from the beginning.

  • Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (260,660 points)

    No, I'm not annoyed, really. It's just that your goal is not easily attained when you have new hardware but an out of data OS, and you don't have any other Macs with which to work.

     

    All you need to complete the task is a Mac that will boot 10.6.3. Unfortunately, that's not something I can help you with.

  • paperqueen Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    First of all, thank you, Kappy, for the great info. Fabulous.

     

    One question: You mention installing a copy of SL in Parallels 7 on a Mac at the end of the step-by-step post about 1/3 of the way down the page. My understanding of Parallels, and from the appearance of their website, was that only Windows could be installed there. Am I wrong? (hope, hope)

     

    My Achille's Heel is GoLive. It requires SL, but my MBA is a Lion-only machine. Partitioning its hard drive to install SL on one side is out (can't physically be done), which leaves either booting into SL on an external drive or...maybe....Parallels?

     

    Which option makes more sense (and which is safer long term)? The ideal scenario would be to have it on the Air's drive, but space on the smaller SSD is an issue. Am looking at this as a possible internal replacement, which would alleviate that particular concern:

     

    http://eshop.macsales.com/shop/SSD/OWC/Aura_Pro_Air_2011

     

    I still have two computers running 10.6.8--a Mini and a MBP late 2009--so there is access to a current copy.

     

    Suggestions? (Please, not "Move to Dreamweaver," etc...I hate that program with a passion.)

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