Previous 1 12 13 14 15 16 Next 586 Replies Latest reply: Oct 4, 2014 3:34 PM by jacobfreakingharris Go to original post Branched to a new discussion.
  • Trent Baur Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Thanks Roy. Again, I just passed along the idea/video. The real credit goes to Mike Robbins who figured it all out on his own. (I still can't imagine how he thought of it.)

     

    For anyone else wanting to try out the hair dryer solution for the greyed out wifi, here's a good write up:

     

    http://www.iphoneincanada.ca/how-to/fix-wifi-greyed-out-iphone4s-ios7/

  • TJBUSMC1973 Level 5 Level 5 (7,310 points)

    Trent Baur wrote:

     

    Been ok for a month now? The hair dryer video is only a month old. Were you one of the first people to see it?

     

    The 'hair dryer' trick has been around for a very long time.

  • tomski84 Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

    Hi all

     

    By means of an update, I have an appointment at my local Apple store on Wednesday to get my replacement.

     

    Whilst on the phone to the call centre I asked the gentleman to confirm if this is a "recognised issue" by Apple. He said that they are aware of the issue. I expressed my concerns in regards to my next replacement being a defective model too, to which he said that I have been "very unlucky" for this to happen twice, and needing a third phone is "hardly ever heard of".

     

    Needless to say I am not holding my breath, I'm pretty sure it's a defective chip or something, I'm no expert but a few of my friends have 4S iPhones and they have no issues. Perhaps it only effects a certain "batch".

     

    I'll udate you all after Wednesday. I'm going to grill the guy at the store and see if he knows anything, and if they keep records of "batches" I'm going to ask for a phone from a different "batch", if any of this makes sense?!

     

    Tom

     

    PS: People keep telling me to cause a fuss and they'll upgrade me to an iPhone 5. Not sure if this is possible. Generally my principles won't allow me to try this out but letting you all know because, well, you never know!

  • Mishmumkin Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Well done Tom with getting Apple to agree with giving you a replacement phone.  Apple also agreed to swap my phone, which was a little older than a year and which they did last Thursday.  I am now back up and running - Happy Days!

     

    It is interesting that there are quite a few people who have the 4S phone and have upgraded to version 7 without issues, which does tend to point towards a batch of faulty chips.  I am sure that time will tell.

     

    I did consider the possibility of upgrading to a 5S but, like you, I would not consider it appropriate to do so at Apple's expense after the Apple Support team dealt with my case to my ultimate satisfaction.

  • pwrchord Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Well the hair dryer trick and reboot worked for about a week.  Not sure what caused wifi to grey-out again, but it did yesterday.  So 4 minutes under the dryer and 10 minutes to cool, followed by a reboot did the trick, again.  After the reboot wifi was on to my default, secure network...no prompting for the pass code, etc.

     

    Don't get me wrong, I'm glad to have my wifi back on, but this is just plain SILLY.  Apple should be embarrassed.  Steve Jobs would never have not let this happen...Apple was a company that used to be able to claim bulletproof hardware and software.

     

    Yikes, a hair dryer and reboot gets me a week of functionality.  Who laughs at a blue screen or ctrl-alt-del now?

  • TJBUSMC1973 Level 5 Level 5 (7,310 points)

    pwrchord wrote:


    Steve Jobs would never have not let this happen...Apple was a company that used to be able to claim bulletproof hardware and software.

     

     

    Percentage-wise, that claim is still true.  And there were defect recalls done while Jobs was around.

  • pwrchord Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Let me rephrase:  Steve Jobs would have corrected the code and made all affected Apple customers whole (by now).

  • TJBUSMC1973 Level 5 Level 5 (7,310 points)

    pwrchord wrote:

     

    Let me rephrase:  Steve Jobs would have corrected the code and made all affected Apple customers whole (by now).

     

    It's not the code.  It's not the software.  It's the hardware.  The iOS update did not cause the problem.  It's a manufacturing defect in a very small percentage of devices.  And Steve Jobs was a major proponent of the Apple Care Protection Plan, as well as staying within the parameters of the warranty program.  I believe he would have abided by the policies he authorized in the first place, except in certain extreme situations. 

     

    But, we're both speculating.  The only difference is that my viewpoint is supported by actual documentation.  Jobs was CEO of Apple until late 2011, and the Terms & Conditions of iOS software and the warranty stipulations have not changed significantly since then.

     

    Jobs was a great man.  But using him as part of your argument is, in my opinion, disgusting.  It's no different when certain politicians claim that the 'Founding Fathers' would never have approved of 'such-and-such'.

     

    Care to cite a source where Jobs ever said that Apple should replace any and all devices that were out of warranty?

  • Trent Baur Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    TJBUSMC1973 wrote:

     

    It's not the code.  It's not the software.  It's the hardware.  The iOS update did not cause the problem.  It's a manufacturing defect in a very small percentage of devices.  And Steve Jobs was a major proponent of the Apple Care Protection Plan, as well as staying within the parameters of the warranty program.  I believe he would have abided by the policies he authorized in the first place, except in certain extreme situations. 

     

     

    I disagree. If it's hardware, how could forcing the phone to overheat (via a hair dryer) reset the chip?

     

    If it's hardware, how come I've yet to hear of a single instance of the greyed out wifi on an iOS6 phone? (If you have one, please provide a link.)

     

    Software exists between the OS and the hardware. This interface between the OS and hardware is what determines the chip to be defective and therefore "disables" it via greying out the wifi option. I believe this is where the bug is and I believe overheating the chip results in a logical code path where the bug is avoided and the chip is viewed as functional, as it always was.

  • pianobob98 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Apple, this is a widespread problem. I've been a longterm user of all things Apple for 25 years, including 4 iPhones on my family plan, and probably a dozen computers. You need to make good on the problem created with this OS7 install (a downgrade, not an improvement in any way, and now screwing up my IPhone 4S). Step up to the plate, or risk once and for all alienating your customers. Seriously, this is a bunch of bull!!!

  • tomski84 Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

    TJBUSMC1973 wrote:

     

    Care to cite a source where Jobs ever said that Apple should replace any and all devices that were out of warranty?

     

    I am thankful that I live in Europe, a place where our governments endorse the fact that a product should work as intended for at least six years when purchased.

     

    I liken your attitude to a milkman selling milk with a use by date of 8th December. He tells you you have 12 hours warranty, after which point you have nothing to fall back on, but don't worry, you can take out a "Milkman Protection Plan", which guarantees the quality of the milk up to and including the use by date. You decline. I mean, it SHOULD be fresh until the 8th, right?

     

    You get it home, open it up, only to discover it's seperated and stinks. You present the milk to the milkman the next day, complaining that the use by date says the 8th and it's gone off. You're told that you can't have a free replacement, that he sold it to you in perfect condition and that your warranty has expired. Sorry, you'll just have to buy a new one.

     

    Now take that milk and multiply the cost of a single pint until you get to the value of an Apple iPhone and then we start getting a bit closer to the true cost of liability here, and possibly why Apple is so reluctant to admit fault. Afterall, that's a whole lot of gone-off milk on your hands.

     

    This has nothing to do with personal responsibility of the consumer. It has everything to do with the responsibility Apple has towards its products and its customers. If this is hardware, which it seems it is, the true liability rests entirely and squarely with Apple, to spin it any other way makes you look like a fool.

  • Craiglloyd74 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I too have the same issue with WiFi being greyed out. I had no issues before ios7 and like everyone else I am peeved. I'm giving you 7 days Apple before I turn off the iPhone for good and move to a competitor for good.

  • happyture Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I too have same problem with my iphone S4 after upgrading to iOS 7 ( Surely this is beyound a joke now Apple you have to help )

  • pwrchord Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    TJB - you're zealous advocation for something that seems pretty upside down almost makes it feel as if 'you' are 'them' (Apple).  But either way - I was in hardware (Prime Computer, DG, Pyramid Technology) and software (MSFT) for >25 years.  Hardware does not fix itself - period (it's either on or off).  A hair dryer on a chip?  LOL -

     

    There is likely an issue with firmware, resident on thier Wifi (chip) implementation.  The overheat/reset obviously has that code starting over at line zero until it hits its head on whatever is causing it to hang (and again, obviously in iOS7).  But nice try. 

     

    And invoking the former CEO is 'disgusting'?  Man, you're out there.

  • TJBUSMC1973 Level 5 Level 5 (7,310 points)

    Trent Baur wrote:


    I disagree. If it's hardware, how could forcing the phone to overheat (via a hair dryer) reset the chip?

     

    If it's hardware, how come I've yet to hear of a single instance of the greyed out wifi on an iOS6 phone? (If you have one, please provide a link.)

     

    Software exists between the OS and the hardware. This interface between the OS and hardware is what determines the chip to be defective and therefore "disables" it via greying out the wifi option. I believe this is where the bug is and I believe overheating the chip results in a logical code path where the bug is avoided and the chip is viewed as functional, as it always was.

     

    How does a hair dryer affect software?  It doesn't.  The code isn't being re-written by a hairdryer.

    The problem is caused by heat, causing a PHYSICAL conneciton to break (i.e., a solder point).  The problem is sometimes solved by heat as well, causing the physical connection (i.e., the solder point) to reconnect.

     

    You haven't heard of iOS 6 phones having wi-fi greyed out?  Look harder: ios 6.1.3 WIFI problem- https://discussions.apple.com/thread/4909703

     

    Need more?  Okay: https://discussions.apple.com/search.jspa?resultTypes=&dateRange=all&peopleEnabl ed=true&q=iOS+6+wifi+greyed&containerType=&container=&containerName=&username=&r ankBy=relevance&numResults=15

     

    It is the hardware.  Your logic is faulty.

     

     

     

    tomski84 wrote:

     

    I am thankful that I live in Europe, a place where our governments endorse the fact that a product should work as intended for at least six years when purchased.

     

    I liken your attitude to a milkman selling milk with a use by date of 8th December. He tells you you have 12 hours warranty, after which point you have nothing to fall back on, but don't worry, you can take out a "Milkman Protection Plan", which guarantees the quality of the milk up to and including the use by date. You decline. I mean, it SHOULD be fresh until the 8th, right?

     

    You get it home, open it up, only to discover it's seperated and stinks. You present the milk to the milkman the next day, complaining that the use by date says the 8th and it's gone off. You're told that you can't have a free replacement, that he sold it to you in perfect condition and that your warranty has expired. Sorry, you'll just have to buy a new one.

     

    Now take that milk and multiply the cost of a single pint until you get to the value of an Apple iPhone and then we start getting a bit closer to the true cost of liability here, and possibly why Apple is so reluctant to admit fault. Afterall, that's a whole lot of gone-off milk on your hands.

     

    This has nothing to do with personal responsibility of the consumer. It has everything to do with the responsibility Apple has towards its products and its customers. If this is hardware, which it seems it is, the true liability rests entirely and squarely with Apple, to spin it any other way makes you look like a fool.

     

    Your anaolgy is ridiculous.  If you buy milk, and then use it after the expiration date, and then it's no good, then you don't have much recourse.  Open it up before the expiration date and it's bad, then you return it.  After the expiration date, oh well. 

     

    Your example implies that you open it as soon as you get it, and it's bad.  Then, of course, in that situation, you get a free replacement.  Have you EVER had a situation where a product was defective within its warranty period (or prior to its expiration date), and you were told you can't get a replacement?  Has Apple told ANYONE that is still within their warranty period (other than those devices that had some form of unauthorized modification/service or damage) that they can't get a free replacement?

     

    I'm not going to debate the difference in the consumer laws between the U.S. and Europe.  I've previously stated that the warranty period should be longer for Apple products.  My opinion on WHAT the warranty should be is not the point.  The point is what the warranty ACTUALLY IS.  Every single person that purchased an iPhone 4S agreed to the warranty at time of purchase.  But now that there's a problem, they want a different deal.

     

    Reminds me of a certain Sith Lord: "I am altering the deal. Pray I don't alter it any further."

     

    You don't get to alter the deal after you've made it, Darth Tomski.  It is what it is.  If you didn't like it at time of purchase, then you shouldn't have bought the product.  Apple doesn't hide the warranty or terms of service. It's part of the activation process on every product I can think of.  You can't even UPDATE to iOS 7 without agreeing to the T&C.

     

    You entered into a legal agreement.  Want to change it?  Ask for the other side to make a concession, or get a lawyer.  Ranting on this forum does you absolutely no good.

     

     

     

    pwrchord wrote:

     

    TJB - you're zealous advocation for something that seems pretty upside down almost makes it feel as if 'you' are 'them' (Apple).  But either way - I was in hardware (Prime Computer, DG, Pyramid Technology) and software (MSFT) for >25 years.  Hardware does not fix itself - period (it's either on or off).  A hair dryer on a chip?  LOL -

     

    There is likely an issue with firmware, resident on thier Wifi (chip) implementation.  The overheat/reset obviously has that code starting over at line zero until it hits its head on whatever is causing it to hang (and again, obviously in iOS7).  But nice try. 

     

    I don't represent Apple.  No one here does (with the rare exception of the moderators, or the Apple Advisor that posts, as an Apple Advisor, usually to answer a question that hasn't been answered by the community for 48 hours.)

     

    Of course hardware doesn't 'fix itself'.  Some outside force has to intervene.  In the case with the hair-dryer (which I've never personally recommended), read my reply above to Trent.

     

    And again, it's not iOS 7.  Read the links I provided.  The wi-fi greyed out, after an update, has been around a long time.  But, hey... nice try.

Previous 1 12 13 14 15 16 Next