Previous 1 7 8 9 10 11 Next 246 Replies Latest reply: Jul 26, 2014 3:39 AM by thomas_r. Go to original post Branched to a new discussion.
  • Albatrosser Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    deggie wrote:

     

    No it doesn't, they moved on to different means of collecting data as singling out iPhones would not be an effective program when you can move on and collect data from all of them. The NSA, like all bureacracies, is a very competitive place. Even with the funds they have some programs get funded, and the people running them get recognized, others get cancelled. A sane person would recognize that this one didn't make it or there would be later documents available.

    And everyone should take YOUR word on that.. Laughable

  • Albatrosser Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    deggie wrote:

     

    Because OS X isn't as riddled with security issues as Windows and this is by design. And parts of OS X are not accessible.

    Which parts of my OS X do you mean is inaccessible to me?

  • Albatrosser Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    deggie wrote:

     

    Because OS X isn't as riddled with security issues as Windows and this is by design. And parts of OS X are not accessible.

     

    If it is not riddled by security issues, then your whole argument against access to the system/files as a security issue falls flat on its face. Are you saying OSX and Linux which are more open by nature than Windows therefore are less secure?

  • Lawrence Finch Level 7 Level 7 (28,915 points)

    Albatrosser wrote:

     

    Sorry, but that is a load of ... The ONLY way of having any real chance of being in control of your own device is to at least have full access rights to the OS and the files. Without that you are driving blind, and have to be a man of faith, not of science.

    I guess you didn't actually read what I wrote. Even if you DO have full access rights to the OS and files you are driving blind when it comes to malware. You have to be a man of faith, not of science in either case.

  • thomas_r. Level 7 Level 7 (29,635 points)

    You are referring to one leaked documents from 2008. It borders to insanity to believe NSA has been inactive on these issues the years from that leaked document until today.

     

    That's the only document we have. Ridiculously, that single document is what is causing all this fuss. There is no other evidence one way or the other.

     

    I would not be at all surprised if the NSA has software they can install on an iPhone with physical access. There's already other software like that out there (such as FinFisher), and has been for a while. Remote access is another thing entirely. There is absolutely no evidence that anyone, including the NSA, has a remote access hack for the iPhone.

     

    You are, of course, welcome to believe whatever you like. However, expect to have your claims met with skepticism if you do not have any evidence at all to support them. It borders closer on insanity to believe that the NSA has a remote access hack when all the far more numerous, and in some cases smarter, hackers out there haven't found such a thing yet. The NSA is not superhuman.

     

    Unless you've got evidence that nobody else here is aware of, all you're doing is speculating, and that is forbidden by the Apple Support Communities Terms of Use.

  • Lawrence Finch Level 7 Level 7 (28,915 points)

    Albatrosser wrote:

     

    He was trusted, and therefore had access.. In the same way that a number of Apple employees today are trused by millions of iPhone users, that have granted them with the "admin"  and "root" power  (Signing applications and distriubting code to iDevices, and complete access to inject any code in any app in the appstore) of pretty much any phone except the jailbroken ones, which could at least potentially be protected.

    You truly don't understand how security clearances are managed. Just being "trusted" does not mean you have access. I have had security clearances most of my 40+ years of working at various levels, and speak from experience. There are several requirements to view classified information. The first is you must have a clearance level appropriate to the level of classification of the material. Snowden had that. The second is that you must have a Need to Know. Just having a clearance does not automatically give you access to everything; you can only have access to what you need to do your job. Snowden DID NOT have a Need to Know most of the material he took. The third is that there must be an audit trail of all access to classified material, showing who had access, who viewed it, and when the access was completed and revoked. And an additional requirement is that someone with a higher level of clearance than the viewer with the need to know must approve the access. Snowden only had the first of these. Thus, NSA's systems are as full of holes as swiss cheese if they permitted Snowden to get away with what he did. There ARE versions of Linux and Unix (and even Windows) that have enhanced security that would have prevented even someone with root privileges from accessing information that they did not have clearance for, and that can maintain permanent audit logs of who has accessed content. Apparently NSA doesn't use those technologies, even though they have been around for over 20 years.

     

    The real fear is that there are over 100,000 people with the same level of clearance as Edward Snowden; is it safe to assume that the other 99,999 are all honest, that none of them work for foreign powers or have private agendas?

  • Meg St._Clair Level 8 Level 8 (42,410 points)

    Albatrosser wrote:

     

    Lawrence Finch wrote:

     

    If NSA has these secure systems you talk about, how do you explain Edward Snowden's released top secret documents? He was a low level Sys Admin who did not have a Need to Know.

    He was trusted, and therefore had access.. In the same way that a number of Apple employees today are trused by millions of iPhone users, that have granted them with the "admin"  and "root" power 

    Do you actually believe that low level Apple employees are made privy to, say, plans for the next iPhone? I'm a trusted employee of a large company. I handle money and large amounts of extremely expensive inventory. They still don't give me access to the company's future plans or to lots of other information. Unless the NSA is composed of very stupid people, they don't give even trusted employees access to information that is not necessary to the job function.

  • Templeton Peck Level 9 Level 9 (59,290 points)

    Folks... STOP FEEDING THE TROLLS....

  • Meg St._Clair Level 8 Level 8 (42,410 points)

    You said it much better than I, Lawerence.

  • Meg St._Clair Level 8 Level 8 (42,410 points)

    Templeton Peck wrote:

     

    Folks... STOP FEEDING THE TROLLS....

    It's a slow day here at work.

  • MathiasP Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Hi CanadianBacon67,

     

    Did you write an opinion or do you know something? ;-)

     

    You're certainly wrong about Merkel because all you know is nothing. It's pretty much the same as with many other "facts" about Stasi 2.0, developed by U.S. government. You can't blame people if they shout out their frustration. You can't blame people for not knowing classified matters.

     

    It's just a question of time and it will become clear that surveillance and propaganda are a pair of shoes walking towards the end of our democracy, towards the end of freedom. And yes, that's my opinion and I have a right to express it even if I am not God knowing everything.

     

    BTW It would have surprised me if Apple was the only company that did not follow the law of Patriot Act and other jurisdiction designed to suppress people.

  • Meg St._Clair Level 8 Level 8 (42,410 points)

    MathiasP wrote:

     

    And yes, that's my opinion and I have a right to express it even if I am not God knowing everything.

     

    You absolutely have a right to express your opinion. If you are a U.S. citizen, you are free to go and stand on a street corner, either real or virtual, and say whatever you like and neither Apple nor the U.S. govermnent has a right to stop you. However, if you come into my house, I have a right to tell you to shut up or throw you out if I don't like your opinions. Apple has the same right here on these forums.

     

    Best of luck.

  • AnonJ Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I don't see how asking for clarification for a product/privacy is comparable to intruding a house. Apple itself actually released a statement regarding this (albeit probably dead) stuff. It says something.

  • AnonJ Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Why nobody ever paid attention to this post, which IMO is a quite reasonable take on the matter:

     

    The program DROPOUT JEEP is irrelevant in the year 2013. The NSA has a data hub that was turned on this year in Utah, that gives them the ability to intercept, record, and store every phone call, voicemail, text message, or email that is sent or made in the US. So they dont need to hack into anyones devices. They went above and beyond any devices security measures. So as far as DROPOUT JEEP goes, I wouldnt even begin to worry about such a miniscule project. There are far bigger worries than software aimed at a single user device. Think about a data storage facility that is 40 football fields of square area.

    Or is because it's not newsworthy anymore, now this is already a well-known(and even accpeted by many?) fact? Horrible.

  • AnonJ Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Jesusv87 wrote:

     

    The NSA has always been out there watching and listening. Why is any of this a big surprise?  If you are doing illegal things then you should avoid the internet and phones. I know people worry about their privacy but what do you have to hide?  If the government wants to see my rear end when I'm in the bathroom with my phone then so be it. I don't care.

     

    What's 100 times more horrible than the actual survillence itself is this kind of shocking attitude. I thought one of the ideological basis of the foundation of the United States is "never trust the government" which is crucial to any modern democracy? Now probably that's just a fairytale anyways.Read some Soviet Union or Chinese history, and see if you continue like this? It's not a matter of whether you "do illegal things". It's a matter of millions of innocent people suddenly disappearing and dying without even knowing why(probably just secretly uttering one sentence of complaint about the government). As a Chinese I know human socieities are capable of doing things much worse than 1984. What happened in China 40 years ago was far more ridiculous than that. If everybody thinks in your way then the end of our democracy and freedom is only a very short matter of time.

     

     

     

     

     

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