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Question: should I buy clean my mac 2 or is there another app I should use?

Want to know if this app or another app is best to use to clean up my iMac and MacBook?

iMac, OS X Mountain Lion (10.8.3)

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Apr 8, 2013 6:19 PM in response to Dick the Bruiser In response to Dick the Bruiser

How to maintain a Mac


1. Make redundant backups, keeping at least one off site at all times. One backup is not enough. Don’t back up your backups; make them independent of each other. Don’t rely completely on any single backup method, such as Time Machine. If you get an indication that a backup has failed, don't ignore it.


2. Keep your software up to date. In the Software Update preference pane, you can configure automatic notifications of updates to OS X and other Mac App Store products. Some third-party applications from other sources have a similar feature, if you don’t mind letting them phone home. Otherwise you have to check yourself on a regular basis. This is especially important for complex software that modifies the operating system, such as device drivers. Before installing any Apple update, you must check that all such modifications that you use are compatible.


3. Don't install crapware, such as “themes,” "haxies," “add-ons,” “toolbars,” “enhancers," “optimizers,” “accelerators,” “extenders,” “cleaners,” "doctors," "tune-ups," “defragmenters,” “firewalls,” "barriers," “guardians,” “defenders,” “protectors,” most “plugins,” commercial "virus scanners,” "disk tools," or "utilities." With very few exceptions, this stuff is useless, or worse than useless.


The more actively promoted the product, the more likely it is to be garbage. The most extreme example is the “MacKeeper” scam.


As a rule, the only software you should install is that which directly enables you to do the things you use a computer for — such as creating, communicating, and playing — and does not modify the way other software works. Use your computer; don't fuss with it.


Never install any third-party software unless you know how to uninstall it. Otherwise you may create problems that are very hard to solve.


The free anti-malware application ClamXav is not crap, and although it’s not routinely needed, it may be useful in some environments, such as a mixed Mac-Windows enterprise network.


4. Beware of trojans. A trojan is malicious software (“malware”) that the user is duped into installing voluntarily. Such attacks were rare on the Mac platform until sometime in 2011, but are now increasingly common, and increasingly dangerous.


There is some built-in protection against downloading malware, but you can’t rely on it — the attackers are always at least one day ahead of the defense. You can’t rely on third-party protection either. What you can rely on is common-sense awareness — not paranoia, which only makes you more vulnerable.


Never install software from an untrustworthy or unknown source. If in doubt, do some research. Any website that prompts you to install a “codec” or “plugin” that comes from the same site, or an unknown site, is untrustworthy. Software with a corporate brand, such as Adobe Flash Player, must be acquired directly from the developer. No intermediary is acceptable, and don’t trust links unless you know how to parse them. Any file that is automatically downloaded from a web page without your having requested it should go straight into the Trash. A website that claims you have a “virus,” or that anything else is wrong with your computer, is rogue.


In OS X 10.7.5 or later, downloaded applications and Installer packages that have not been digitally signed by a developer registered with Apple are blocked from loading by default. The block can be overridden, but think carefully before you do so.


Because of recurring security issues in Java, it’s best to disable it in your web browsers, if it’s installed. Few websites have Java content nowadays, so you won’t be missing much. This action is mandatory if you’re running any version of OS X older than 10.6.8 with the latest Java update. Note: Java has nothing to do with JavaScript, despite the similar names. Don't install Java unless you're sure you need it. Most users don't.


5. Don't fill up your boot volume. A common mistake is adding more and more large files to your home folder until you start to get warnings that you're out of space, which may be followed in short order by a boot failure. This is more prone to happen on the newer Macs that come with an internal SSD instead of the traditional hard drive. The drive can be very nearly full before you become aware of the problem. While it's not true that you should or must keep any particular percentage of space free, you should monitor your storage consumption and make sure you're not in immediate danger of using it up. According to Apple documentation, you need at least 9 GB of free space on the startup volume for normal operation.


If storage space is running low, use a tool such as the free application OmniDiskSweeperto explore your volume and find out what's taking up the most space. Move rarely-used large files to secondary storage.


6. Relax, don’t do it. Besides the above, no routine maintenance is necessary or beneficial for the vast majority of users; specifically not “cleaning caches,” “zapping the PRAM,” "resetting the SMC," “rebuilding the directory,” "defragmenting the drive," “running periodic scripts,” “dumping logs,” "deleting temp files," “scanning for viruses,” "purging memory," "checking for bad blocks," or “repairing permissions.” Such measures are either completely pointless or are useful only for solving problems, not for prevention.


The very height of futility is running an expensive third-party application called “Disk Warrior” when nothing is wrong, or even when something is wrong and you have backups, which you must have. Disk Warrior is a data-salvage tool, not a maintenance tool, and you will never need it if your backups are adequate. Don’t waste money on it or anything like it.

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Apr 8, 2013 12:34 PM in response to Dick the Bruiser In response to Dick the Bruiser

These types of Apps Are Not Necessary... as Mac OS X tends to look after itself.



To keep your Mac Happy... See Here...


http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1147



http://www.thexlab.com/faqs/maintainingmacosx.html



Mac OS X: About background maintenance tasks

Apr 8, 2013 12:34 PM

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Apr 8, 2013 12:40 PM in response to Dick the Bruiser In response to Dick the Bruiser

The popular advice on here will be don't buy it, you don't need it. Some of the apps that claim to 'clean your mac' or 'speed up your mac' can actually do damage by removing essential system files.

Macs generally do a good job of taking care of their own housekeeping.

See what others may say, but I'd recommend you don't bother. If you're looking at these kind of apps the one to avoid at all costs, based on reports on here and elsewhere, is MacKeeper. It can bring an otherwise healthy Mac to its knees.

Apr 8, 2013 12:40 PM

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Question marked as Helpful

Apr 8, 2013 6:19 PM in response to Dick the Bruiser In response to Dick the Bruiser

How to maintain a Mac


1. Make redundant backups, keeping at least one off site at all times. One backup is not enough. Don’t back up your backups; make them independent of each other. Don’t rely completely on any single backup method, such as Time Machine. If you get an indication that a backup has failed, don't ignore it.


2. Keep your software up to date. In the Software Update preference pane, you can configure automatic notifications of updates to OS X and other Mac App Store products. Some third-party applications from other sources have a similar feature, if you don’t mind letting them phone home. Otherwise you have to check yourself on a regular basis. This is especially important for complex software that modifies the operating system, such as device drivers. Before installing any Apple update, you must check that all such modifications that you use are compatible.


3. Don't install crapware, such as “themes,” "haxies," “add-ons,” “toolbars,” “enhancers," “optimizers,” “accelerators,” “extenders,” “cleaners,” "doctors," "tune-ups," “defragmenters,” “firewalls,” "barriers," “guardians,” “defenders,” “protectors,” most “plugins,” commercial "virus scanners,” "disk tools," or "utilities." With very few exceptions, this stuff is useless, or worse than useless.


The more actively promoted the product, the more likely it is to be garbage. The most extreme example is the “MacKeeper” scam.


As a rule, the only software you should install is that which directly enables you to do the things you use a computer for — such as creating, communicating, and playing — and does not modify the way other software works. Use your computer; don't fuss with it.


Never install any third-party software unless you know how to uninstall it. Otherwise you may create problems that are very hard to solve.


The free anti-malware application ClamXav is not crap, and although it’s not routinely needed, it may be useful in some environments, such as a mixed Mac-Windows enterprise network.


4. Beware of trojans. A trojan is malicious software (“malware”) that the user is duped into installing voluntarily. Such attacks were rare on the Mac platform until sometime in 2011, but are now increasingly common, and increasingly dangerous.


There is some built-in protection against downloading malware, but you can’t rely on it — the attackers are always at least one day ahead of the defense. You can’t rely on third-party protection either. What you can rely on is common-sense awareness — not paranoia, which only makes you more vulnerable.


Never install software from an untrustworthy or unknown source. If in doubt, do some research. Any website that prompts you to install a “codec” or “plugin” that comes from the same site, or an unknown site, is untrustworthy. Software with a corporate brand, such as Adobe Flash Player, must be acquired directly from the developer. No intermediary is acceptable, and don’t trust links unless you know how to parse them. Any file that is automatically downloaded from a web page without your having requested it should go straight into the Trash. A website that claims you have a “virus,” or that anything else is wrong with your computer, is rogue.


In OS X 10.7.5 or later, downloaded applications and Installer packages that have not been digitally signed by a developer registered with Apple are blocked from loading by default. The block can be overridden, but think carefully before you do so.


Because of recurring security issues in Java, it’s best to disable it in your web browsers, if it’s installed. Few websites have Java content nowadays, so you won’t be missing much. This action is mandatory if you’re running any version of OS X older than 10.6.8 with the latest Java update. Note: Java has nothing to do with JavaScript, despite the similar names. Don't install Java unless you're sure you need it. Most users don't.


5. Don't fill up your boot volume. A common mistake is adding more and more large files to your home folder until you start to get warnings that you're out of space, which may be followed in short order by a boot failure. This is more prone to happen on the newer Macs that come with an internal SSD instead of the traditional hard drive. The drive can be very nearly full before you become aware of the problem. While it's not true that you should or must keep any particular percentage of space free, you should monitor your storage consumption and make sure you're not in immediate danger of using it up. According to Apple documentation, you need at least 9 GB of free space on the startup volume for normal operation.


If storage space is running low, use a tool such as the free application OmniDiskSweeperto explore your volume and find out what's taking up the most space. Move rarely-used large files to secondary storage.


6. Relax, don’t do it. Besides the above, no routine maintenance is necessary or beneficial for the vast majority of users; specifically not “cleaning caches,” “zapping the PRAM,” "resetting the SMC," “rebuilding the directory,” "defragmenting the drive," “running periodic scripts,” “dumping logs,” "deleting temp files," “scanning for viruses,” "purging memory," "checking for bad blocks," or “repairing permissions.” Such measures are either completely pointless or are useful only for solving problems, not for prevention.


The very height of futility is running an expensive third-party application called “Disk Warrior” when nothing is wrong, or even when something is wrong and you have backups, which you must have. Disk Warrior is a data-salvage tool, not a maintenance tool, and you will never need it if your backups are adequate. Don’t waste money on it or anything like it.

Apr 8, 2013 6:19 PM

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May 30, 2013 10:13 AM in response to Dick the Bruiser In response to Dick the Bruiser

What is the bext way to uninstall a program/application? I assume to use any uninstaller that is included with the programs/applications itself. But what if it doesnt have an uninstaller, like Disk Inventory X. I googled it, but could not find any solution. Should I just move the application to the trash bin? What about any other foles that still remain like the plist files. Should I be concerned about these?



Edit: I just found some information from a link posted above


http://www.thexlab.com/faqs/uninstallingapps.html


But I an still wondering...

May 30, 2013 10:13 AM

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Dec 12, 2013 11:35 AM in response to Linc Davis In response to Linc Davis

@Linc Davis


Thank you for taking the time to write such a logical, common sense piece of advice. Never a truer word said!


Online support forums are a minefield of bad advice. And while there are some good eggs like yourself, there are a lot of time wasters and especially a lot of people who are ready to jump on a guy to say "hey, if you don't know - you shouldn't ask". Not that there's any of that at all here, it's just refreshing to read a really good down to Earth bit of guidance.


Thanks

Dec 12, 2013 11:35 AM

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Jan 9, 2014 10:21 AM in response to Dick the Bruiser In response to Dick the Bruiser

While I agree with the above about things to do to maintain the mac, Clean My Mac 2 is an awseome app. I can uninstall and disable things on the fly and no need to track down related files. I use it often and makes mac life easier. I think it's bad advice to simply state don't use it or you don't need or it's crap. It's not crap, it's a very useful app. Some say you don't need any anti-virus for mac, while I agree to some level, I use ClamXav and guess what it found like 4 trojans in the form of email attachments from years ago that I never knew existed. Backups don't fix anything, maintenance is a necessary part of computing, even on the mac.

Jan 9, 2014 10:21 AM

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Jan 9, 2014 2:12 PM in response to macapple_ In response to macapple_

I can uninstall and disable things on the fly and no need to track down related files.


You think you're getting all related files, but you're probably not. General purpose app uninstallers like this are unreliable, prone to either removing too much or not enough. Such apps should never be used. If an uninstaller is needed, you should only use the uninstaller provided by the developer of the app being removed.


maintenance is a necessary part of computing, even on the mac.


Not this kind of maintenance. The kind of things that CleanMyMac does are completely unnecessary and can actually do more harm than good.


See The myth of the dirty Mac.

Jan 9, 2014 2:12 PM

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Feb 13, 2014 4:37 AM in response to John Galt In response to John Galt

John Gait. Like macapple_, I've also used cleanMyMac for quite some time without any problems. While you supply links to many so called problems caused by CleanMyMac 2 these are poor examples. The first problem is caused by deleting icloud and not solely due to what was used to delete it. The speed issues in Mavericks are a known issue with upgrading to Mavericks, see other discussions, and should not be linked to one particular app without proof.


A lot of the comments made earlier by Linc Davis are very true and very useful. Your comments however are just unwarranted sarcasm towards macapple_ and do nothing to help the discussion.


There is a lot of software that can cause problems if used incorrectly but this can be due to the user just as much as the software itself.

Feb 13, 2014 4:37 AM

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Feb 13, 2014 5:16 AM in response to KG60 In response to KG60

Thank you for your comments.


It's good to know the community has gained another CleanMyMac shill willing to help, since macapple_ has not acted upon my request.


During the past 30 days additional requests have been posted that require resolution:


Movies folder deleted my downloaded non-itunes movies?

CleanMyMac 1 deleted lots of my apps like photobooth, terminal, mac app store, preview, etc. I use Mac OS X Mavericks. What can I do?

All Data Lost?

MacBook Pro running really slow lately

Why is my macbook Slow and fan always running

uninstall locklizard using cleanmymac, delete all my files and personal setting

Apple Mac OS X 10.9.1 Thread 0 crash

Pixel Size / Aspect Ratio on Original Photos got inverted resulting in distorted photos. How can I fix it?

Really struggling with MacBook Pro Speed....

my mac is running slow here is the system specs

no trash in trash

my macbook pro has slowed down in boot and launch since mavericks

Find duplicate pictures within an event, in iPhoto?

I have used clean my mac and after that some of my icons from launch pad have disappeared, mail is opening but not displaying the emails, app store is not opening...what should i do? I request for urgent help ...please...??

I may have missed a few more, but I'm sure those users will appreciate your expert counsel as well. TIA!


Postscript:


... Not only did it not work, it made things worse. Now, I dont have ANY icons on my dock but the names are still there when I mouse over the dock.....ABSOLUTELY HORRIBLE! I hope this serves as a warning for people to NOT buy this sh!tty app as it WILL destroy your computer. I am living proof of that.....I sent them another email letting them know of this and I hve not heard back from them....GOD I WISH I COULD SUE OR DO SOMETHING...Now I have to spend 100's of dollars to fix this. I cant just wipe the drive. My entire working life in on this computer.....What a horrible company. I hope they go out of business....

Feb 13, 2014 5:16 AM

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Feb 28, 2014 3:36 AM in response to John Galt In response to John Galt

It is always up to person to decide if s/he wants to invest time and effort into studying the details (which files can be deleted, which should not, etc) and cleaning the system or get a solution that does it in a couple of clicks.


Each software gets positive and negative feedback - and there can be plenty of reasons for it starting from personal preferences, continuing with personal experience and finishing with commenting on competitors` products. And it is logical that people mostly share negative feedback when they face difficulties (usually there is no reason to write a thing if it all works perfectly). Well, each person is free to have their own opinion.


John has shared links to the issues which in his opinion are related to CMM malfunction. We will comment on them having studied the details shared by the people who reported the problems. If you are interested in details, keep on reading. If you are thinking whether you need Mac cleaning software, there have been enough of great comments since the start of the thread. If you are our client and have faced a problem, contact our support team via support@macpaw.com to get it solved asap. So:


Issue 1:

Movies folder deleted my downloaded non-itunes movies?

CMM cannot delete user's files without direct request from user: they cannot be corrupted by our software. The user has not indicated proof of CMM malfunction.


Issue 2:

CleanMyMac 1 deleted lots of my apps like photobooth, terminal, mac app store, preview, etc. I use Mac OS X Mavericks. What can I do?

Compatibility issue between CleanMyMac 2 and Mavericks was fixed in CleanMyMac 2.1.0. The user can contact Customer Support, so we can teach him know how to reindex Launchpad caches.


Issue 3:

All Data Lost?

The user already taken his laptop to service. The possible reason is improper uninstallation. In such cases we help our clients when they contact the support team.


Issue 4:

MacBook Pro running really slow lately

It is possible that the Mac is slow due to a big number of apps launching alltogether. User can contact us to learn how to disable not needed startup items and check if that works for him.


Issue 5:

Why is my macbook Slow and fan always running

It seems to be a hardware issue. In such case user can contact us via email and get immediate responce and instructions.


Issue 6:

uninstall locklizard using cleanmymac, delete all my files and personal setting

That's the issue we've already located on our test labs. Locklizard app assigned user's home folder as its own default folder and while user was uninstalling that app, it marked user`s folder for uninstall, too. We've already fixed that issue and really sorry for that one.


Issue 7:

Apple Mac OS X 10.9.1 Thread 0 crash

There could be a wide list of reasons for those crashes. More details are needed to define the exact cause. Still, the user knows how to reach support.


Issue 8:

Pixel Size / Aspect Ratio on Original Photos got inverted resulting in distorted photos. How can I fix it?

That's really strange case. Customer should contact us directly, so we can try fixing it via rebuidling library and a few other steps.


Issue 9:

Really struggling with MacBook Pro Speed....

The problem may be caused by incorrect CleanMyMac 2 removal by trashing the main application file and leaving all helpers and monitors behind. This may cause incorrect work and uncontrollable resource consumption by the mentioned processes. The attached logs show that daemons are running, but it's not clear whether the application file remains in the Applications folder.


Issue 10:

my mac is running slow here is the system specs

It looks like Java issues. The user can contact us and share more details: we`ll be glad to help him.


Issue 11:

no trash in trash

CleanMyMac did nothing at this point, here's the same issue what was solved by setting up Trash permissions: https://discussions.apple.com/message/22523688#22523688


Issue 12:

my macbook pro has slowed down in boot and launch since mavericks

That rather looks like a Mac OS X issue. Once user has his Mac upgraded, he can continue using CMM.


Issue 13:

Find duplicate pictures within an event, in iPhoto?

CMM won't be able to do that task for him but of course it won't corrupt his Mac OS X system.


Issue 14:

I have used clean my mac and after that some of my icons from launch pad have disappeared, mail is opening but not displaying the emails, app store is not opening...what should i do? I request for urgent help ...please...??

It was a compatibility issue between CleanMyMac 2 and Mavericks. Fixed in CleanMyMac 2.1.0. The user can contact Customer Support, so we can teach him know how to reindex Launchpad caches.


What we are saying is that there is always an option and each issue can be solved if addressed timely.

Feb 28, 2014 3:36 AM

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Feb 28, 2014 4:26 AM in response to MacPaw Support In response to MacPaw Support

MacPaw Support wrote:


It is always up to person to decide if s/he wants to invest time and effort into studying the details (which files can be deleted, which should not, etc) and cleaning the system or get a solution that does it in a couple of clicks.


The issue is not how to clean the system, it's the fact that the system does not need to be cleaned. See The myth of the dirty Mac. I raised this point with you on another topic, but got no response.

Feb 28, 2014 4:26 AM

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Feb 28, 2014 6:27 AM in response to MacPaw Support In response to MacPaw Support

MacPaw Support wrote:


What we are saying is that there is always an option and each issue can be solved if addressed timely.


Then solve them.


You have yet to respond to any of the subject Discussions and addressed none of the others. They are a small representative sample of Discussions that I happened to come across.


They are not "issues". They are real people with real problems that have lost time, money, precious family photographs, or other irreplaceable data. To dismiss them as "issues" is insulting. Considering that I may see but 1/10 of 1% of all the CleanMyMac related problems on this site, and that a similarly small percentage might bother using this site to report problems with it, you have some work to do.


If you are interested in solving the countless problems resulting from CleanMyMac then solve them. Knowledgeable Mac users prefer to avoid problems. They do so by not creating problems through the use of any ill-conceived "cleaning" products. CleanMyMac is not the only one.

Feb 28, 2014 6:27 AM

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User profile for user: Dick the Bruiser

Question: should I buy clean my mac 2 or is there another app I should use?